Versys owners checkin

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by pilot, Oct 17, 2007.

  1. Deltron

    Deltron Of the Golden Flower

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    Jun 19, 2013
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    Illinois
    I know most people don’t want to do this to their versys. But does anyone have any info or have tried putting clip on type handlebars on The second gen 650? Or does anyone know how low one can go without interfering with the fairings?
  2. jdrocks

    jdrocks Gravel Runner

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    Jul 6, 2007
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    7,538
    clip-on bars have been have been used on the Versys, but street fighter, cafe, urban or other custom bikes. poke around on the net and you'll find photos of these motos. i don't think they're going to work with OEM fairings.
  3. Deltron

    Deltron Of the Golden Flower

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    Thanks, I have seen some of the photos and posts over at the versys forum. They usually don’t have the stock fairing which I was hoping to keep since I really like the look. Maybe if something ever happens and I need to change the fairings I’ll do it then.
  4. Atalanta89

    Atalanta89 Been here awhile

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    Well, R1 shock is setup. I used a 2008 R1 shock, with custom spring from Cannon Racecraft for my weight plus luggage. Had the eyelets drilled/bored. The top hard steel sleeve was able to be bored, the bottom end was drilled due to a replacement mild steel sleeve put in from previous owner. But my machinist was able to make it work. Super stoked to get it on, all less than $300.
    mminob likes this.
  5. mminob

    mminob Been here awhile

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    Sweet, you may try the high and low speed compression clicker adjustment towards the softer end of settings for a more plush ride, and the rebound near the middle range ...

    There is a lot of clicks on both so if you count the total number , full soft to full hard , then go back to the middle for a starting point... Go for a ride with a screwdriver , allen hex, and socket for comp.

    Pick a bumpy road and look for any wallowing of the rear, or pogo up and down, that is your rebound adjuster at the top , with a flat blade... This is the most important clicker..

    The high and low speed clickers can tune out some bump harshness , which depending on road surface, rocky, rutty , or smooth highway, can provide a more compliant ride...

    Also , set your rider spring sag , with your preload, at about 2 inches , which is one third of travel, six inches total... have fun :-)
    Atalanta89 likes this.
  6. MoneySlide

    MoneySlide Tall Teller of Tales

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    May 2, 2014
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    I think Iv got the most I can get out of the stock rear tire on my gen 3 650 is there any recommendations for a different rear or anybody know where I can get another stock tire my closest dealer quoted me $320 bucks for just the tire
  7. Wood1

    Wood1 Long timer Supporter

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    Revzilla or bike bandit is the place I usually go to for rear tires
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  8. Gustavo

    Gustavo Motociclista Errante

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    Yeah, at that price, I'd make my own tires out of rubber bands... :loco

    Your favorite online retailer is an obvious option, learn to change the tires on your own or find an independent shop that will mount them for you.

    There are lots of options - from cheap (but surprisingly decent) Shinkos to high end Michelins. This is in stock sizes:
    https://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/...s?v=2016-kawasaki-versys-650-kle650a&page=All

    If you choose to go with a narrower 150/70-17 rear, that opens up a whole lot of adventure tire options too.

    Gustavo
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  9. Atalanta89

    Atalanta89 Been here awhile

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    I used bike bandit and was very pleased with the price and fast shipping.
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  10. edtheslowrider

    edtheslowrider Been here awhile Supporter

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    I've got a few K miles on a Shinko 705 and it's not bad, pavement and gravel roads. 150 width. Started out in muddy season with it.
    I've been running PR3's, 4's and 5's thru the years and they have always been great.
    As far as the stocker - I could not recommend a tire less (Dunlop of some sort).
    I took mine off around 2K if I recall, it did not seem to stick to warm pavement.

    Wow $320 for just the tire - I would never go back
    MoneySlide likes this.
  11. AmbientMoto

    AmbientMoto Adventurer

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    I found a pair of new 705's on eBay a while back from a shop... amazing price...
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  12. MoneySlide

    MoneySlide Tall Teller of Tales

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    if i went with a different size would that affect my speedometer or odometer
  13. Gustavo

    Gustavo Motociclista Errante

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    Yes, both. The speedometer is optimistic by about 7% on the Versys. The odometer is practically spot on. Using a 150/70-17 tire increases the overall tire circumference by about 3%, so, your speedometer error will go down by that amount and the odometer will now have a 3% error, reading lower than actual mileage.

    It's a similar effect as you get from changing sprocket sizes.

    Gustavo
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  14. RoaringTodd

    RoaringTodd Been here awhile

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    I have shinko 705's and they increased vibrations between 20-50mph. After 50mph they're smooth. The stock tires were much smoother, but didn not last.
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  15. MoneySlide

    MoneySlide Tall Teller of Tales

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    Another dumb question this will be the first time that I have ever had to change a tire on a road bike or a tubeless tire so do you have to balance these
  16. Doug Just Doug

    Doug Just Doug Silly Party Candidate Supporter

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    Yes, and the balancing is typically included in the mounting price, but I'd confirm if it's not clear. I always opt for a new valve stem when doing a tire change, too, though it's not always absolutely necessary depending upon how old the current one is.
    MoneySlide likes this.
  17. edtheslowrider

    edtheslowrider Been here awhile Supporter

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    I have not been balancing my tires and so far I've lived to tell the tale.
    Comment on Gustavo's post, changing sprockets would have no effect on speedo on most bikes, since
    speed is measured / calculated via the ABS sensor (if there's no speedo cable).

    After installing the 150 rear I didn't detect much of a speedo difference, maybe slightly less optimistic based on roadside
    signs. Still reads an MPH or two fast - haven't checked with a GPS.

    Another note - installing tires and especially the 705's - warm the tire beforehand - leave it in a car parked in the sun for an hour or two,
    makes a huge difference mounting a warm (softer) tire. So much easier, the 705's have a stiffer sidewall that most road tires I've installed.
    MoneySlide likes this.
  18. Gustavo

    Gustavo Motociclista Errante

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    It depends on where the pickup point is. Many older designs (but newer than the old style speedo cable to the front wheel :gerg) use a sensor at the CS sprocket (all years Versys 650, AFAIK). Since this measures the revolutions the CS sprocket makes to calculate speed, changing gearing via sprocket changes will result in a different actual speed vs. instruments. Newer designs rely on the rear ABS sensor (Versys 300, Wee3, for example) to get a speed reading. When relying on the ABS sensor for speed measurement, changing sprockets will not have an impact on your speedo/odo reading, but changing tire sizes will because it changes the overall circumference of the tire.

    Gustavo
  19. edtheslowrider

    edtheslowrider Been here awhile Supporter

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    Well I learn something new every day.
    Since it's impossible to decouple the rear wheel speed from CS (or CS sprocket) speed without disconnecting
    ABS sensor (or god forbid a chain breaking) I would not have realized that until my speedo or ABS stopped working.
  20. mentolio

    mentolio Been here awhile

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    +100 on warming those Shinkos up before mounting!^^^ I could not warm mine up enough, (did it in early spring) and it made it so much more difficult to mount the rear, at least.