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Versys-X 400 speculations thread

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by PaD, Oct 26, 2017.

  1. DavidM1

    DavidM1 Unicorn hunting

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    Yeah, liebfraumilch in the minibar is definitely not to my taste.
  2. cyclopathic

    cyclopathic Long timer

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    Prefer warm sake? I could not get taste for it; good thing japanese drink beer.
  3. 11motos

    11motos Feral Rider

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    In colder regions the boxer engine is a great feet/ leg warmer. They think of everything!!
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  4. 11motos

    11motos Feral Rider

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    I hope Kawasaki offers the add-on with knobby tires...

    upload_2020-5-17_18-23-26.png
  5. jspringator

    jspringator Long timer

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    I used to go to Japanese steakhouses a lot and I LOVED warm sake. I had forgotten all about it. I don't drink any more so I guess that chapter is closed.
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  6. 11motos

    11motos Feral Rider

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    I love the teriyaki trays with a bit of salmon, tuna, tempura, salad, rolls. etc... very tasty and nice healthy lunch meal here locally.
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  7. ag_streak

    ag_streak Tiene Ruta Cuarenta? Supporter

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    2.5 years, 3,500+ posts, and 178 pages in, and we're down to talking about Japanese food and sake... :( :muutt :lol3

    I gots cash burning a hole in my pocket for something new and exciting! C'mon Kawasaki! :dirtdog
  8. cyclopathic

    cyclopathic Long timer

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    There's no such thing as japanese steakhouse; it is 100% american invention. In Japan you can get yakiniku which is similar to korean BBQ but no steak.
    Hamamelis likes this.
  9. jspringator

    jspringator Long timer

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    So is Texmex.... and I like that too!
  10. 11motos

    11motos Feral Rider

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    I estimate that we are still ~2,000 California rolls away from getting any sort of glimpse of the VX400. :lol3
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  11. Hamamelis

    Hamamelis Inmate

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    one perk of still having a young man's metabolism (for now...) - I can put away a pretty good number of rolls at a time eh
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  12. Wallachian Spikes

    Wallachian Spikes Long timer

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    Isn't Pizza a US invention as well?
  13. cyclopathic

    cyclopathic Long timer

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    Not sure; they do have pizza in Italy but it tastes very different not sure why.. brick oven, less grease, different ingredients?

    Gyro Greek sandwich was apparently invented in Chicago and it is post WWII contraction
  14. Wallachian Spikes

    Wallachian Spikes Long timer

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    Didn't know that about the Gyro. LOVE me some Greek food. My wife makes a Murderous spanakopita & baklava.
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  15. DavidM1

    DavidM1 Unicorn hunting

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    I had to look that up. I always suspect most Greek recipes are of Turkish origin since the Ottomans ran Greece for over 300 hundred years.
    See Gyros in Wikipedia - gyros is basically a translation of döner which originated in Bursa, Turkey, in the 19th century. I'm not sure if I've ever had an Iskender kebab which is the famous one.

    When I get a Versys-X 400, I'll go there and try one. I nearly wiped out a pedestrian who was walking across a motorway in Bursa in '93.
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  16. cyclopathic

    cyclopathic Long timer

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    The doner is famous in Mexico too; known as taco al Pastor. You see vertical grill at street stands and taquerias. Main difference? More spice and 100% pork. From what I understand Gyro can't be called doner as well because of use of pork.

    As for turkish rules of road it is definitely takes some adjustment. From what I was told by locals noone slows down for pedestrians it is their responsibility to get out of your way. For me turkey was an eye opener even after Greece and Albania; that until I got to Batumi.
  17. DavidM1

    DavidM1 Unicorn hunting

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    I had a nice pork gyro in Crete last year.

    Yes, I've learned that lesson now. But at the time I didn't know what the f**k he was about to do. The image is still burned in my brain.
  18. Hamamelis

    Hamamelis Inmate

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    Most of the dishes mentioned have an interesting history in that, they are American inventions, but often by way of new immigrants to America making the dishes based on what was locally available

    When you're a poor Italian, Chinese, etc immigrant in 1935 who ends up in New Jersey, San Fransisco, or elsewhere, and all of a sudden you have access to stuff like heavy cream and fat pigs/chickens at very low prices relative to the old country, who needs authenticity when you can put food on the table? Pizzas get thicker and cheesier, fried chicken gets bulkier, sauces and curries grow creamier - a similar thing happened in the north of Britain with Chicken Tikka Masala, too. Heck, even corned beef and cabbage, often touted as an Irish-American heritage food, is impossible to find in Ireland except at touristy spots - there is an entire tourism industry in old Eire predicated upon taking "Irish"*-Americans' money - because it was made with the foodstuffs available to immigrants in NYC (often bought from established German/Polish communities, too)

    The only one that really screams "restaurant gimmick" is the Japanese steakhouse, but that's still a pretty clever philosophy of "hey, let's use our old fashioned cooking [which is in itself an adaptation of Korean barbecue] to charge for American portion sizes"

    To bring this around to motorcycles, this is how you get the metric cruiser eh

    *The number of people who claim Irish heritage is artificially increased in this country due to cultural weirdnesses around being from certain backgrounds in World War I
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  19. Hamamelis

    Hamamelis Inmate

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    Actually, now that I think about it, the ultimate bike for that Americanization process is the Goldwing, which was made in the USA for 30 years (the 1980 GL1100 through the end of the pre-facelift GL1800 in 2010) and especially during the span of time where it hit peak size - the heaviest Goldwing ever was the GL1500 in the '90s
  20. Ken in Regina

    Ken in Regina Long timer Supporter

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    In North America it goes back even further than that. There was a particularly large creation of American and Canadian "Chinese" dishes when the transcontinental railways were being built - American in the mid-1800s and Canadian at the end of the 1800s. Yes, it was adapting dishes they were familiar with to the ingredients available at the time. But it was mainly for their own consumption, initially. And it was adapting to items that were affordable and available locally to workers. So there was, at least at that time, nothing "thicker", or "fatter", or "heavier".

    What introduced those modified dishes to the American and Canadian public was the opening of Chinese restaurants. When the railroad construction was finished you had a whole bunch of workers who had no work left so they got into anything they could in order to survive. Many chose to try their hand at running small inexpensive restaurants. In many small towns in Canada these were the first restaurants to open, and often the only ones.

    Others worked as cooks in logging and mining camps or in private homes. Since they were not originally cooks they went with what they knew and that was the dishes they had been preparing for themselves already.

    Sorry, I can't think of as slick a segue back to topic as you did! :photog

    ...ken...
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