Ves ATW

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Veselko, Nov 9, 2018.

  1. Veselko

    Veselko Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
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    Couple pics from yesterday. Overall the weather was better... no snow! But the last hour was grueling. A cold front was coming in and crosswinds were hitting 50 mph easy, with light rain. I was all over the road. And that was while on an interstate with cars zooming by me at 75. I just couldn't muster more than 55 against the wind...
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    Today the day did not start out great. I actually dropped the bike taking it off the center stand... When's the last time I did that? Never... and in the Walmart Parking lot while picking up some supplies! This thing is heavy. Weighs less loaded then my last bike, but it's really top heavy. I could barely lift it up. I cranked my back a bit doing it... Alright, that's enough! Snow, rain, high winds, drop the bike... all in just the first three days...

    On the bright side the weather was better, but by the end of the day temps were in the 90's... Wow, wasn't I just in a snow storm two days ago?

    It was a long day in New Mexico, over 300 miles and 7.5 hours. Just trying to get out of Dodge. Currently about an hour from the Mexico border, will be crossing over tomorrow. Hope to settle in a spot for a couple days and just take a break from the non-stop riding...

    Hello? Anyone out here?
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    Nope... just me and my ass... Wait, here comes a car...
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    This is near White Sands Small Missile Test Area...
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    I think someone on here said, they're just pictures of the bike with changing scenery... yeah, that's about right.
    #21
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  2. Veselko

    Veselko Been here awhile Supporter

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    Border crossing into Mexico was fairly painless. I did my preapproval to enter and also did my vehicle import online. Only thing to do was jump between a couple of windows, fill out another form to import myself, pay some money and I was off. Glad they spoke English cause my Spanish is still way borderline.

    Decided I'll spend a couple nights in Juarez, plan my next move, get some pesos (apparently the gas stations don't take US credit cards), and send some postcards to the grand kids... that was the deal, send post cards. You have no idea how difficult it is to find post cards in Juarez... Do people still send post cards?

    Air B&B, $18/night! Taking advantage of the luxury accommodations at nice prices while I can. the lady of the house didn't speak English, so with my meager Spanish and a lot of help from translation programs, I got invited out to dinner with them. Husband hadn't spoken English for some 8 years, but we managed to have a good conversation and they even showed me some of the town and helped me find those illusive post cards. Amazing people.

    I crossed the border at Jeronimo-Anapra and then took the Jeronimo-Anapra road East into Juarez. Definitely sketchy roads, sketchy humanity and some aggressive drivers along the way (lanes in the road, what lanes, make you own lane). In general in Juarez the driving seems to be a little looser than the US, but people give respect, so not bad.

    In terms of sketchy, so apparently, from what my host says, Juarez has been cleaned up and it's not the sketchy place it was 8 years ago, but there's still enough crime to keep your wits about you, and as a result of the bad years pretty much any community worth anything has gates, guards, one way in, one way out. We're not in Kansas any more...

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    #22
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  3. Veselko

    Veselko Been here awhile Supporter

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    I was sitting in Denny's this morning... Yeah, Denny's... I wanted to eat at one of the authentic places (arroz y frijoles con verduras?) but I guess the natives are a little slow opening restaurants on Sunday morning... but anyway, I'm looking out the window as I'm sitting, cars going by like any other big city street, but the waiter is in no hurry to come to my table, and I realize the pace is just a little different here. Little bit slower. The guy in my head says, "Hey, where the heck is the waiter? Hola, donde esta mi camarero!"... I think that's part of this trip, I need to kill that voice... teach him to settle down. Get out of that hurry, hurry, mode that just pops up for no reason. Too many years working in the corporate world, where the sky falls if you don't get something done now! I never bought into it, but it's definitely effected my psyche. Anyway, first meal ordered on my own... Yeah, ok, not a big deal for all the experienced world travelers, but something I take for granted every day... I barely know any Spanish, but now I've proven to myself I can at least order in a restaurant and I won't starve!

    There is this feeling of being off balance, not moving with the confidence that one has when you have a routine in a familiar place. You're thinking slower because you're actually thinking, not just on autopilot. Everything is new.
    #23
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  4. joenuclear

    joenuclear Still here....

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    Brilliant!
    #24
  5. Veselko

    Veselko Been here awhile Supporter

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    Reminds me of a time I went down some road looking for a beach. Came up to a guard shack. Guy says where you going? I shrug my shoulders and say I don't know... He looked at me really strange, and then my girl friend on the back quickly added, "To the beach, we're looking for the beach!"... Moral of the story. Even if you don't know where you're going, it's a good idea to say something... You don't want people assuming things. Was it Theroux that also said, not all who wander are lost?... But sometimes you should pretend you are.

    Last night I landed in Nuevo Casas Grandes. Course I don't know why they call it that, there aren't any grande casas around here. But that's that difference again. Different pace, different concept of space. Couple I'm staying with actually has two small casas, and I pretty much get my own during the day. Under construction, but I'm lacking nothing. They're letting me use their makeshift kitchen, so cooking my own meals. From the moment I pulled up we were just cracking up. No English for the lady of the casa, and her husbands is worse than my Spanish. First thing I said was, es caliente... laughs ensued. Ah.. ya... later figured out that it's calor... Caliente is reserved for like.... hey baby, you're mucho Caliente! Fantastic couple. They actually made me a meal, waiting for me on the table after I got out of the shower. Wow. Hospitality. Even drove me around in the evening to show me the town a bit. The laughter with the translation just kept going. But through it he's learning English and I'm learning Spanish. My faith in humanity is being restored daily...

    On the way to Nuevo Casas went down route 2 and 10 from Juarez. The road just goes on and on... basically open desert with a couple towns and truck stops. I saw some big dust devils (mini dust tornado). One was right by the road. I just moved on. Have you ever been swallowed up by one? Can't see anything, get knocked over, and pelted with pebbles... It sucks.

    One stretch of road there was two groups of 20's types, walking along the road. Don't know how they got there, and where ever they were going, they had a long way to go in the 90 degree heat. As I rode by each group, there were these thoughts that ran through my head, like... they're gangs, they're up to no good, are they going to block the road, would I stop or put my head down and ram, would I survive, should i wave. There was another group... about seven guys by a car... there's no outrunning them if they come after me... Anyway, stupid thought like that. How quickly that voice just starts to freak out... Maybe some of my thought had validity, maybe it's just self preservation, maybe I need to stop assuming...

    Today, did the tourist thing and went over to Pequime which is a few minutes away. Archaeological dig from 1200 AD. Not much standing, basically just the foundations of what use to be a town. That's only 700 years. Wonder what will be visible of our civilization after 700 years. You think "Hey Google!" will be around... our buildings... any humanity?
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    After a hot ride, I'll take that.

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    #25
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  6. Veselko

    Veselko Been here awhile Supporter

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    Been a few days since I've had a data connection, and even today's is sketchy. We'll see how it goes.

    My next stop was Vincente Guerrero. I didn't make any advanced reservations in Vincente, just wasn't feeling it, but figured I'd get there, see what it was like and decide to stay or move on. I moved on, to Creel. It was an extra two hours to get to Creel so didn't arrive until around 6:00 pm, 260 miles total for the day.
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    I got into town and circled around a bit, but couldn't find the Air B&B place for the night, called the host, told him where I was, and he said he'd come and get me. Young guy pulls up in a truck, Christopher. He speaks no English and we came to an understanding that I would follow him. He promptly starts driving out of town, which I thought unusual because the ad. said they were right in town. Then he goes down a gravel road, another gravel road, and I'm wondering where I'm being let to. But we end up 1.5 miles out of town at a property that has multiple cabanas.

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    I had made myself some burritos that morning, ate one for lunch, and upon arrival, sat down at the picnic tables in the yard to have the others for dinner. I promptly made friends with a couple pups on the property.

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    On 6/6 I took a walk in to town for breakfast. Figured with all the sitting and riding it would be good get some exercise in. The town was relatively clean and authentic Mexican; women dressed in colorful clothes, brightly painted houses, and a central square where music was playing and people were mulling around. Like someone said, it's all authentic, but this is along the lines of the stereotypical Mexican town, the one we like to see in our heads.

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    After breakfast I took a ride to Basaseachi, which was about 80 miles North East, to see the Basaseachi waterfall. The listed time to get there is two hours and twenty minutes, but I made it there in about two hours. Nice roads between Creel and Basaseachi, but a bit challenging. The roads are non stop curves, and beautiful scenery, which reminded me very much of California or Colorado.

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    But the road was in disrepair in many places, big numerous potholes in many of the curves, just where you don't want them. Motorcycle riders debate about the best line through a corner, in this case the best line was one that avoided as many of the craters as possible, which typically meant a zigzag through the corner. I think I achieved a new level of mid corner directional changes and obstacle avoidance skills. Nothing like 100 miles of it to give you practice.

    At the parking area for the Basaseachi falls there was a guy looking to drum up money, asked me if I needed a guide on the trail, I told him not, then he said he'd look after my bike. Couldn't hurt. I noticed in Juarez there seem to be these guys who direct traffic and watch cars in parking lots for businesses and malls. They are employed by the establishment that owns the property. But they are always looking for tips.
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    The hike to the top of the falls was about a mile and then the descent down the cliff was a zig zaggy near kilometer. The cliff section was pretty tough coming back up. Looking down from the top you really got a sense of the distance, though that time of the year the water flow was minimal. When I got to the parking lot I sat down on a bench with my bike watcher. He told me July and August there was more water; rainy season. We exchanged a few more words, I gave him a burrito I had in my back pack, and a US dollar, and went on my way.

    Speaking of tips, my previous host told me that in general they tip the old people (like an older gentlemen bagging your groceries), but not the young. Because old people can't get a job, and they want the young to stay in school, not go chasing after money. Also, tips are kind of optional but if for example you want to give one in a restaurant, it's usually a set amount, like five pesos, not a percentage of the bill. Whatever you feel like.

    I decided to stay another night at this place in Creel. The plan for the following day was to go to Copper Canyon which is just 50 miles south of there.

    Ok, so a week and a day into the trip, what's the overall? I'm definitely getting into it. Whereas at first the doubts were high, I'm starting to believe this is actually doable. I still need to improve my Spanish, but I know barely enough to get by. My stomach issue is still with me, and it doesn't help that I can't get the kind of food I want. Literally no one seems to serve brown rice, and a couple of the burrito places in town don't even have rice. The best rice was actually at Denny's in Juarez. Hard to believe. Anyway, the Mexican diet seems to be meat, beans, onions and peppers, heavy on the meat. And when you do get rice they barely give you any. Last I heard, rice was a lot cheaper than meat. There are very few street vendors of fruit and vegetables, though I did find one small place and a grocery store that had some. Bought some fruit, veggies and brown rice (I just eat it dry and chew it like a gazillion times). Sweet potatoes also seem to be elusive; can't find one anywhere.

    There all these "SIX" and "OXXO" stores everywhere, at least one each per town. Basically it's junk, the same kind of stuff you get at convenience stores in the US. Prepackaged, tons of sugar, etc.. Extremest Muslims look at America as the whore who corrupts the world, and hence one of the reasons why they don't like America; spreading our capitalism, goods, beliefs and values and corrupting centuries of tradition. Judging by the way the US's propensity for processed foods is spreading, it's hard to argue with them. So, is shooting someone because they're bringing Twinkies and Big Mac's to town justified?

    When I got back into town that evening I stopped at one of those convenient stores. Near the door, sitting on the sidewalk was a little girl, maybe 7-8 years old. Course thick black hair in long pony tails, colorful dirty dress, dark dirty face, holding some kind of watch in her hands. She said something to me as I walked by. I didn't understand her but figured she needed money so I gave her a few pesos. As I was in the store I thought I should buy her something to eat, so bought a pack of cookies for myself and some relatively healthy one's for her. Went back out, scooched down and asked her what she needed. She said she needed some food. I gave her the cookies and walked to my motorcycle. I thought a bit, went back and gave her some more money, patted her on the head and rode away. It later dawned on me that this traveling was a good thing. I'm living for less than I could live on in the US, I'm experiencing things I never would have experienced, and when I do pay for services, I'm giving it to people who certainly need it. It's a win-win.

    Last day in Creel I took a ride to Copper Canyon, about 50km Southwest. It's supposed to be four times the size of the Grand Canyon in the US, but the roads are such a mess I only got a couple views of it. There was one road which lead to a viewing area and some hiking trails but finding it was near impossible. At one point I went up this road that was paved in a way I'd never seen; kind of like cobblestone, except the the cobbles were not flat on their tops and just a mess, and it was all curvy up hill. Talk about a jarring experience. But that wasn't the road I was looking for. I came down and figured out it was this dirt road that fed into that rock road. But it was a worse mess; the part that I could see had ruts, boulders sticking out, and that's going up hill. Figured long as I was there let's see. I got to the top and OMG, it was a steep downhill, barely wide enough for a car, rutted, and boulders sticking out. I promptly and gingerly turned myself around and headed home. My around the world journey was not going to end on some boulder strewn road leading to who knows where, just to go see another view of the canyon. But that wasn't the end to the fun. To get me back home the MAPS.ME took me on a shortcut. I saw that it was dirt, figured how bad could it be? It was bad. All first gear, standing on the pegs, undulating surface, some boulders sticking up, ruts, spots where it was angled 30 degrees with ruts. There wasn't a straight piece of dirt in the whole distance. I wouldn't call it a road. I was reminded that my previous host had told me that unpaved Mexican roads are really bad. He was not kidding. It was only a mile, but it was a long mile. And I have to admit, fun. The DR650 has got some grunt. In first gear it feels like it could crawl over anything. Watching those off road riding videos on YouTube paid off too!

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    Warning! Technobabble (more than usual). First shady spot I saw out of Copper Canyon I pulled over and ate some lunch I brought with me. Couple days ago I noticed that my little metal spacer I was using to put some clearance between my center stand and chain had come undone (so much for Krazy Glue durability). The center stand did have some light scuff marks indicating the chain had touched it. So, I did a McGiver; there was some garbage laying around, so took a cap from one of the bottles, cut off a strip and put it around the bolt that the center stand touches. This spaced it back out so it's not touching the chain. When I got to town I stopped at a shop and asked about them welding some metal in place but they said they couldn't do it... Ah well, there's plenty of bottle caps to be found on the roads of Mexico.

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    Most of the way back to Creel I came across a guy sitting on a BMW on the shoulder. I pulled over and asked him if he spoke English. He did, and he was OK, but was sitting there waiting for an ambulance to arrive so he could lead it to his friend, who at Copper Canyon, had fallen and apparently broke some ribs. I had seen a bunch of guys on high end dual sport bikes entering the main Copper Canyon area as I was leaving, he said those were his friends, and they were about 300 miles from home. We talked some more, wished each other luck, shook hands, and I took off. Hopefully his friend will be OK.

    Got back to the place I'm staying at, and took the 1.5 mile walk back into town for dinner. I like walking the town. Gives me time to absorb it in a way that's just not possible when you're traveling at even 20-30 miles per hour. Yup, 2.3 miles per hour is about right. Passing people on the street, walking or sitting on benches. There's benches all around the town, and people do actually sit in them. Usually it's the older folks, maybe because they don't have anything to do. But you have the opportunity to look them in the eyes, say buenos tardes, and affirm that connection that exists between all of us, regardless of what language we speak.

    I've goat about 2500 - 3000 miles to Cancun, just north of Beliz, the next country in line, and some 57 days, so don't need to do too many miles per day on average. So, I can just zig zag around a bit. The riding gets me sore by the end of the day; hips, shoulders, arms, and my back is still feeling that Walmart parking lot motorcycle pickup, though it's definitely been improving. I think it's just my body settling into the riding. Haven't done any long distance riding since June of 2017.

    Saturday 6/8

    I had to look at the calendar to see what day and date it was. Always a good sign. On vacation you're suppose to forget those thing because they don't matter. When you're life becomes travel, it matters even less.

    Today was supposed to be a relatively short day. MAPS.ME said 98 miles, 2 hours 12 minutes from Creel to Guachochi. Ya. Actually took me about 4-5 hours to do that 98 miles, but what a 98 miles. When it comes to canyon roads, this one was up there with the best I've ridden. 100 miles of mostly curves and beautiful scenery. Here's a random section of the road:

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    Yeah, that's my happy ass eating an apple for lunch.

    I was looking the bike over and noticed this:
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    LOL! That just seems wrong, to have almost no chicken strips on a fully loaded dual sport bike. I should probably ease up a bit, but hey you get in the groove. In the canyon there's no cross wind, just smooth air, the thumper is a thumping, you're focused, stirring through the gear box, trail braking front and rear, rolling on out of the corners... ohmmmmmm... It's all good... Surprisingly most of the road was in pretty good shape, but there were some sections where mid corner pothole/crater dodging was required.

    Then there's this:
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    Seems that every pull-off is littered with plastic... Just over that edge, a ways down is a river. I'm sure there's plastic in that river. What are we doing?

    By the time I got to my destination the temp was at 104 F, but sure didn't feel like it. Definitely something to be said for dry heat.

    For a bit there I thought I was going to need to set up the tent somewhere, because apparently the only Hotel in town was booked. Also considered moving on, but the closest towns were hours away. But between MAPS.ME, Google Maps, and especially IOverlander (tecnology... it can be useful) I found a hotel. We're talking top of the line hotel with in-house restaurant with cloth table cloths... And get this, I managed to make a reservation, over the phone, with no translator... Mi espanol esta mejorando!... Yeah, but I couldn't say menu so that the waitress could understand me... hey, it's journey.

    Luxury hotel $30...
    Fish dinner... $6...
    Roadside snack... $2...
    Gas to get there... $8...
    Hours of twisty canyon road in Mexico, priceless!

    Tomorrow I'm looking at a long day, and quite a bit of unpaved roads, we'll see how that goes.
    #26
  7. Veselko

    Veselko Been here awhile Supporter

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    Headed Southwest out of Guachoci to see if I can get across the mountains to Boborigame. Finding what I thought was the right road I ended up in the forest, which wasn't awful, but the photo here is deceptive. There were some deep ruts and some rocks sticking out. Had a little stream crossing.
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    Then it got ugly. Turned into a downhill loose rock mess and as I looked further ahead the rocks were thicker and bigger. No way I was going to make it down that. So, picked a spot to turn back around. Problem was I was already on the steep section, best I could do was get the bike perpendicular to the road, and then I was stuck. Couldn't go forward cause there was a drop-off, couldn't go back because the rocks were blocking my wheels and I couldn't push the bike back. Couldn't put it on the side stand to clear some rocks because I was at too much of an angle... so I layed it down on the uphill side and lifted and dragged the rear end more down hill until I was at about 45 degrees, then picked it back up. There is something wrong with putting a bike down to drag it on rocks! The pic below is after I got it turned around and slightly up hill. Had to take a breather after that. Got back on it let out the clutch, rocks flying, bike bouncing, handlebars going every which way and made it up.

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    Got back up to the main road and thought why is the GPS telling me to take this ridiculous road. The paved one I was on headed in the same general direction, so decided to just stay on that. About half a mile down I saw that these roads joined... Ok, headed in the right direction. The paved road looked like it was recently constructed. Aside from the rocks and boulders strewn in my lane, not bad. Then the pavement ended. If it was all as good as these two pics I would have been great.

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    But it wasn't. There were ruts, ditches, boulder, but I made it past the near visible curves and then some.

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    I'll tell you what. I set up the suspension on the bike for the load I was carrying. Without the load it's just stiff, with the load the front end is still a bit stiff on the asphalt. Going downhill across ditches and boulders it was soaking the stuff up like there was no tomorrow. Then it got uglier.

    I was coming down a downhill past some construction equipment (guess this is where they stopped) and I hit this fine powder. Basically I think it was cement, like 6-8 inches thick on the road. If I had know what it was, maybe I could have slowed down. I was doing about 10-15 mph because I just got over some ruts and rocks. Soon as I hit this stuff my front end started back and fourth, I tried the rear break but I had no traction. It's like I was hydroplaning. I started gaining speed, it got thicker, the handlebars started lock to lock and down I went in a huge ball of dust. Good news is it was thick and soft. Stood up, turned the bike off, and tried lifting it... no way. Took my helmet and jacket off and set them aside to prepare to unload the whole thing and then lift it. Then two guys came out of nowhere, they must have been in the construction equipment? I did't see them, but I was a little preoccupied. They helped me lift the bike. The three of us could barely maneuver it in this stuff on the road. They told me this was the only area where there was this thick powder, the rest of the road was similar like up to that point (just ruts rocks boulders and ditches). But even to the nearest town it was a minimum 5 hours, and that was way short of my destination. I was already over two hours to that point. So, did I want to go through 5 hours of bouncing off ditches and boulders? No... On the trip I'm sure there will be roads like this where I'll have no choice but to follow them, but here I had a choice. Trouble will find me, I don't need to go looking for it. We talked about alternatives and decided on one. I shook their hands, muchas gracias, and charged back the way I came, which was no piece of cake either.

    There was that voice in my head "what are you doing? You can do it. Go back. Go back." I told it to shut up, and enjoyed the rest of the ride, which was again a sweet road. Some of the white dust blew off but I had some cleaning to do, myself and the bike... manana...

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    Holding up for two nights to think it through. The alternative route will be over 10 hours and just over 20 miles of unpaved road. Or forget the West coast and just keep heading Southeast?
    #27
  8. Cro59

    Cro59 Been here awhile

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    Alone on a heavy bike in unfamiliar territory...sometimes you just have to live to fight another day. We've all turned around at one point or another.
    #28
  9. Veselko

    Veselko Been here awhile Supporter

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    I hear you on that. Staring off into the distant mountains, seeing that squiggly line disappear, it was tempting, but discretion was definitely the better part of valor.
    #29
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  10. Veselko

    Veselko Been here awhile Supporter

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    Ok... did some research... so much for my alternate route across the mountains...
    "...the unfinished segment [of 24] on the west is at about 820 meters elevation at Soyatita. Just outside Los Frailes, the road coming from the east is at 2,750 meters elevation. The traveler crossing this gap will have to negotiate this dramatic change in elevation traveling a good deal of the way on unimproved dirt roads. Travel times in this central section can be quite slow. This central portion of the highway passes directly through the region known as Mexico's Golden Triangle, notorious for drug cultivation, drug trafficking, and related violent drug incidents..."

    The elevation is probably not a deal breaker. The unimproved section might be, but I can probably do without the drug cartel. South it is!
    #30
  11. Veselko

    Veselko Been here awhile Supporter

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    Can't beat days like today... The road to Santiago Papasquiaro. Crossed over from Chihuahua to Durango.
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    This near white ribbon of road was somewhere around 80-100 miles. Nearly flawless concrete, winding it's way across the hills, through the mountains in the distance, and the farmland. Apparently the farmers like the road too, to drive their cattle... Ran into a couple herds, and there was a dead something by the side of the road, looked like a calf... maybe got hit. There was at least six or seven buzzards feasting on it...
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    Stopped for lunch. My idea of a lunch room... no chairs required...
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    Shades of Colorado, Utah, New Mexico. If you plunked me down here I'd be hard pressed to tell the difference.
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    On the asphalt road there was again some pothole dodging.

    First interesting thing in town... Santiago Papasquiaro... the cemetery.
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    #31
  12. Veselko

    Veselko Been here awhile Supporter

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    Ate breakfast at Manuelitos both days I was there. Great food. You get your plate of food plus a cheese spread and chips, bowl of perfectly ripe fruit, home made apricot marmalade, with home made cookies. Here's a pic with the owner and his wife. Great people!
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    After stuffing myself at breakfast and posing for pics, I headed for Mazatlan.
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    The road (40) a ways south of Durango is just amazing. Here's a close up of one of the sections. Crazy, reminded me of the Tail of the Dragon. Just non stop curves.
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    The road went on like that for dozens of miles. It was slow going, in the 20-30 mph range mostly. Interesting that 40 and 40D run right next to each other. I think 40 is the original and 40D is the new two lane highway... a lot less squiggly. Anyway, I spent most of the time on 40, winding though the mountains. It was surreal. I definitely wasn't in Colorado any more. It was moist and cool, and the smells were heavy with pine needles and something I couldn't identify. Maybe it was the cow crap from the cows... Yeah, there were a few spots where they were just grazing along the side of the road. There really wasn't much room for anything or anyone along the huge cliffs, but there was an occasional house here and there.

    There was an army checkpoint before the real squiggly stuff started. No big deal, they asked me for my identification and I was off. They are men of few words and many guns... made me nervous!

    Also, as I was zooming along, two younger guys were on the side of the road with their motorcycle. They waved and I wasn't sure if they needed help, so I turn around, and yeah they had a flat. So, whipped out the tools and the patch kit and helped them go at it. We got it patched and partially inflated. I had two CO2 cartridges, but it wasn't enough to seat the bead all the way around, but it's the best that could be done. They tried to offer me money, I told them to use it to buy a new tire. I've never seen such a bald tire in my life. I put my stuff back together, and zoomed past one of them again by the side of the road. Looks like they ran out of gas, but I saw the other guy was already with two guys getting a big jug of gas off the truck.

    So, the Mexicans are big on roadside churches, especially of Mary... Mother Mary speak to me, whisper words of wisdom, let it be...Apparently Mary drinks Coke, but at least she doesn't throw her bottles all over the highway like everyone else...
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    At my digs in Mazatlan, I'm not sure this shower would pass code. After a long day (300 miles) who needs hot water anyway.
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    I've taken to just showering with my clothes on. Soap it down, peel it off, work it, rinse it... fresh clothes tomorrow.
    #32
    roadcapDen likes this.
  13. Veselko

    Veselko Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2017
    Oddometer:
    169
    Location:
    CO
    You know, when you were a kid the ice cream man would come around the neighborhood playing his song. Here in Mazatlan, anyone that's got anything to sell uses a megaphone and drives through the neighborhood. Feel like I'm listening to to commercials for Lucha Libre! Yesterday it was a guy in a truck selling water jugs, today I think the same guy is coming but it's some guy on a tricycle (two wheels and box-o-something in front).

    Ok, I think I got this Mexico driving thing...
    1. No one uses signals.
    2. If I get to a space first it's mine.
    3. Motorcycles can do anything they can get away with. Well, so can cars, but motorcycles can get away with more.
    4. If you don't like what I'm doing, let me know by blowing your horn.
    5. ATGATT is whatever. Right now it's 93F and feels like 117, though still not bad if you're moving.

    Mostly driving is like skiing, watch out for the guy downhill from you... That's reasonable! But, I'll just go easy... whew, talk about sensory overload when trying to find something. Traffic and businesses packed tighter than my panniers.

    Found a Suzuki shop and went and got my oil changed. Manager said it would take a "Mexican hour" but they got it done in less than an hour and used the good stuff, synthetic, $30. Muy Bueno! I cleaned my air filter, and I'm good for a while!

    Typical big city with a lot more horn blowing. Traffic cleared up after rush hour.

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    Meh... I've seen bigger...
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    #33
    crashkorolyk and Drybones like this.
  14. Cro59

    Cro59 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2015
    Oddometer:
    817
    Location:
    Tucson, Arizona
    :lurk
    Enjoying the ride.
    #34
  15. Veselko

    Veselko Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2017
    Oddometer:
    169
    Location:
    CO
    Me too Cro, me too.. :ricky

    Got a tip from the salesman at the Suzuki shop about which beach has minimal tourists. Went out to get some sun... Can you spot the crab on this towel... bugger started crawling up my leg... He was half the size of the roach...
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    This one was a lot bigger than the roach, but just the shell...
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    View of the shore and beach area from out on the rocks.
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    Went hiking along the shore. Pelicans flying overhead and skimming the water, the waves crashing on the rocks. Warm water. Mariachi bands playing on the beach. Walking through shallow waters looking for shells. Laying in the surf and letting it sway me. Warm sun on my back. Crabs scurrying across rocks. Siting in a beachfront restaurant, warm Corona with lime. Shrimp with cucumber and onions, and just the right amount of spice.

    The view from Mariscos Rosita.
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    #35
    roadcapDen likes this.
  16. roadcapDen

    roadcapDen Ass, Grass or Gas, no free rides.

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,218
    Location:
    GTA, ON, CDA
    Nice, very NICE! Thanks...
    #36
  17. b00sted

    b00sted n00b

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2018
    Oddometer:
    5
    Location:
    Chicago
    So, not much different than Chicago.
    #37
  18. Veselko

    Veselko Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2017
    Oddometer:
    169
    Location:
    CO
    My pleasure to take you guys along.
    You're right, Chicago, just at a little slower pace, so you have a little more time to react.

    Well, my last day here in Mazatlan. Moving further south.

    Took a ride and then hike up to the highest lighthouse in the Americas. Whew... a squiggly path and then like 500 steps... it's up there... like 98 degrees feels like 115 kind of hike. My ass was sweating through the pants.
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    This is the main strip along the shore. They are just building hotels and condos like they are going out of style. Nice few mile drive. There's also a walking and bicycle path... Kind of like Chicago, but with palm trees.. :)
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    This guy was a little bigger than the last one, and the legs were still moving. Yes Mildred, they grow them big aqui...
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    #38
  19. b00sted

    b00sted n00b

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2018
    Oddometer:
    5
    Location:
    Chicago
    This is Dave B by the way, hence the Chicago reference.

    Maybe when you make it over to Europe(Ireland maybe?), I'll fly over and rent a bike to ride with you for a few days. The back roads of Ireland are amazing by car, and I'm assuming 10x better on a bike.
    #39
  20. borderlinebob

    borderlinebob Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2016
    Oddometer:
    319
    Location:
    CANADA-1/4 mile N of International Falls, MN
    Just found your RR tonite and am happily following along..
    Great images and enjoy your writing style.
    Thanks for doing this.
    BB
    #40