Ves ATW

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Veselko, Nov 9, 2018.

  1. Veselko

    Veselko Adventurer Supporter

    Joined:
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    Started the day early, on the road by 8:00. Needed to do five hours of riding and get through the Guatemala/Mexico border LaMesilla/Cuauhtemoc and say goodbye to Guatemala for now. If you're asking why am I going back into Mexico, then clearly you're not paying attention... :snore

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    There was absolutely no lines at the border. Got out of Guatemala in like 20 minutes, 5 for the passport, and 15 trying to negotiate an exchange rate on my money. Current rate is $100 USD to $1900 pesos. One guy wanted to give me $900 pesos... I'm like, did I calculate something wrong? wtf... what are you smoking... No way, beat it.. And I'm sure people are getting screwed by him every day. I took care of my passport, came back out, saw another guy... we negotiated $1700... that's still really steep, but way better.

    Getting to the border was a trip. For blocks, both sides of the street, nothing but booths selling all sorts of crap. Designer clothes, shoes, backpacks, jewelry, carvings... you name it, it was there. I've never seen anything like it. I don't know how many people it would take to buy up that much crap. Then there was this truck, open top, that would just randomly stop and start tossing boxes up. I don't know if it was garbage, or what, but the street was just barely wide enough for him and a tuk-tuk, so when ever he stopped he stopped traffic, and everyone is just sitting watching him load up. I put some grease on my panniers and squeaked my way past. Just a madhouse... like a shark feeding frenzy... everyone trying to get the tourist dollar.

    The Mexico side was way calmer and almost as fast. No lines. I already had my import paper, so fill out a form, go pay the banker, come back, s-stamp, I'm done... By the way, on the Guatemala side, no one cared about my import paper at exit [shrug], guess that makes sense, since it's not a deposit like for Mexico. Mexico is like $400 US you get back. Guatemala was a straight $160 Quetzals going in, which is like $8... Amigo, puedo tener mis ocho dollares? Que? ... no,... beat it!...

    Anyway, most of the ride today took me along a river, high cliffs on both sides. Scattered small towns. Some open road with sweepers when I was just getting into Mexico, some mud and gravel. It felt good to get on some open roads.

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    And tell you what. My riding is a calm take no prisoners approach now. Best place to pass slow vehicles, at the speed bumps. I turned down my rebound dampening a good bit on the rear shock and the bike is taking those bumps way better. Amazing what ten clicks will do.

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    And my digs for the night are damn impressive. I'd call it a home, but it's more like a complex. The man is one rich Mexican. And I get a whole apartment for like $18/night. I mean the bathroom is bigger than my entire bedroom the previous two nights. There's a kitchen, huge bedroom with a couch and a bed, and a front room. It dawned on me in San Pedro La Laguna, when sitting with another Spanish student and one of the professors, as they were drinking servesas by the pint, that I'm spending less on lodging than some people spend on servesas!
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    And I'm down to the wear strip on my rear tire. New tires should be getting delivered in Turipache, which is about 700 miles away, just south of Cancun. It's going to be close! I'm getting my money's worth out of this one. Hopefully there's more curvy roads ahead so I can even out the wear a bit more.
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    We'll see what the weather is like tomorrow. I ran into a guy when I stopped for lunch, he said he heads up a motorcycle club in this town and he invited me to come by the coffee shop where they meet in the evening. Mexican hospitality! Now if I can just remember the name of the place... :hmmmmm
    #81
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  2. Drybones

    Drybones Fish bones are on my truck seat cover, too

    Joined:
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    I've been following...but I must have missed the reason for going back. ???
    #82
  3. Veselko

    Veselko Adventurer Supporter

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    My girlfriend is flying in. She spent the summer in Croatia. We're meeting just south of Cancun for a couple weeks to discuss her joining me. She's all in, just a matter of how and when. She took her MSF and passed both riding and written with flying colors, though I'm not sure she's entirely sold on the idea... neither am I... new rider, going around the world? That's a rough break-in... But I'm also not sold on the idea of two up around the world. Anyway, the meeting is a set date. I was originally going to take the Spanish class afterward, but I progressed through Mexico faster than I thought I would, so just figured I'd take the Spanish class first and go back into Mexico after, so now going to meet her. Big discussions coming!

    Anyway, took a walk around town today. Definitely up there on the scale of classy Mexico towns. Apparently San Cristobal use to be the state capital. Though not any more, but it's still considered the cultural center of the state. Lot going on! Museums, markets, banks, restaurants. Has a blend of that traditional look and history with a modern twist. Almost a little too commercialized, but not bad.. Streets are in pretty good shape to and the air is relatively clean also. 55 Degrees this morning. Up at about 7500 ft elevation?

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    That one is my digs. Usually that would be like eight houses.

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    But the place gets 0 points for having one place that sold avocados for $3.50 US a piece, and no decent vegetable stores. But it does have like six places you can buy a cover for your cell phone. I finally found a little corner store run by two little old ladies that had some fresh veggies and fruits. What I bought was $12 pesos. Gave her a $50. She says she doesn't have change, asks me where I live, says I can just bring it by any time and I walk out with my veggies. Went and got some change and came back. That's awesome.
    #83
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  4. Veselko

    Veselko Adventurer Supporter

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    This is where I show you a pretty picture or two and say what a great road it was going from San Cristobal
    to Palenque.

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    True. Miles and miles of winding road through the hills. But today I got a first hand look at the fact that Mexico has bigger problems than potholes in their roads and junk in their stores.

    As I turned onto the main road headed for Palenque, a couple police officers waved me down at the intersection. The guy asks where I'm going, etc.. then tells me that the road is impassable, there's a block. I asked if a motorcycle can squeeze by, then he says something about me being a tourist. Other guy joins the conversation and basically one is saying no, the other is gesturing to go on. It would have been hours more to take a different road, so I went on. Maybe an hour or two later I come up on a line of cars on the side of the road. I go up to the front. There's a truck crashed into a car, both burnt, the asphalt around them is burnt, totally blocking the road. One of the people points me to the ditch on the side of the road. Maybe a steep foot into it. I go in, and there is room to get by the mess and I get back out. A little further down, right in front of a bridge, there are two trucks, crashed into each other, burnt. Doesn't look passable. I get off, go look. There's just enough room on one side between the bridge rail and the truck. I squeak by. A little farther and there's a burnt truck and a tree. Enough room to get around. A little further there's a huge truck across the whole road. Again the only thing open is the ditch. I pull in. I'm against the trucks front bumper on one side, and digging weeds off the bank on the other side. I made it through. There were some cars mulling around on the other side. I ask a couple guys if there's more like this and they say no, that's all there is. After that the road was empty of cars for the most part, but a lot of people and families walking on the side of the road, and a lot of trucks with blue covers on the back, some kind of star and dove symbols on all of them. One guy carrying a rifle, with rope for the strap.

    You get the picture? I got the picture. What ever happened last night, was not good.

    As I went further, several times, adults in the towns, or kids, strung a rope across the road and were collecting money for something. They let me pass. One group wouldn't. They wanted 100 pesos, to help with something. I gave it to them.

    In general I got the impression that the people were poorer than even other places I've seen.

    No idea what was going on, but it's all very sad. I'm just glad to have made it to my destination.
    #84
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  5. Drybones

    Drybones Fish bones are on my truck seat cover, too

    Joined:
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    Yikes, that was sketchy! You maybe should copy that post and save it in an inbox message. Soften it up substantially and repost it before your girlfriend reads it. If you do, I'll delete this comment. She might find it a bit too scary. :p3rry
    #85
  6. Veselko

    Veselko Adventurer Supporter

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    Yeah. Sketchy is a good word... No problem. I told her already. She's just glad I'm safe. But thanks for the consideration.
    #86
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  7. Veselko

    Veselko Adventurer Supporter

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    Made it to Escarcega Campache today. Not much to see. The road is about as straight as they get. Cutting through the plane. I looked up Escarcega on travel Wiki... Things to do? Change buses... Not kidding, that's what it said. Apparently a featureless attractionless town in the middle of nowhere. A place to just pass through. I took a side loop which included Emiliano Zapata and Balancan de Dominguez. Rio Usumancinta or Chacamax, depending on what map you look, winds though that area. Flat, fertile, and green. Reminded me of Wisconsin... and 95 and humid... whew! Cold shower felt really good.

    There wasn't much of this shady road, but it was very welcome.

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    My shower buddy... lost some parts... at least he's clean... nothing worse than a dirty roach...
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    #87
  8. Veselko

    Veselko Adventurer Supporter

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    I think papa roach came looking for mama roach... Sorry, I had nothing to do with it, she was like that when i found her... move along...
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    I think this is what you call a Mexican standoff...
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    Can you see the second set of legs on that spider? That's got to be as wide as my hand. I just tiptoed around them, they didn't budge, hoping someone would eat someone... may the best pest win...

    Alright already! Stop bothering the wildlife!

    I did take a walk through part of town. I don't know, it doesn't look much different than any other small Mexican town. They gave it a bum rap on travel Wiki. It's got a busting main street, a market area selling everything you need and you can walk across it in about 40 minutes. The streets are actually pretty wide and in decent shape.

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    But at 10:30 in the morning it was already mid 80's and humid... went up to 99... whew, donde esta la playa? No tienes la playa? Oh mi...

    Sobre la camino otra vez manana...
    #88
  9. snobear

    snobear Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2010
    Oddometer:
    539
    Location:
    Saskatchewan Canada
    Really enjoying your trip and like that you are writing lots of detail in.
    I am near retirement now and Central/South America is the first goal.
    I have been considering a DR350 over the 650, what are your thoughts on travelling with the smaller bike from what you have done so far?
    #89
  10. Veselko

    Veselko Adventurer Supporter

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    Hey man, glad you're enjoying it. I've actually thought about that a lot. How big is big enough? I see all these small bikes down here,125-200 cc loaded up with all sorts of stuff and they all seem to do fine. Yeah they don't have the top end for the open sections and they're a little slow on the uphills, but I don't think you'd have that problem with the 350. I do find that even with the 650 I'm working the gearbox a lot on the uphills to keep it from lugging. I'm used to bigger bikes, so it's just something I notice. A lot of days on the twisty roads I'm barely breaking 40mph.

    You do run into a lot of slow trucks, on curvy uphill roads. Sitting behind them is not really an option because they're spewing black smoke most of the time. It's nice to have some power in reserve to get by quickly. Good thing is they are moving really slow!

    One thing that's kind of annoying about the 650 is the gearing. Even with a 14 tooth on the front, when you get into the town's, in traffic, going really slow, especially on steep sections, first great seems too tall. Or when you're on a crap road and slowly crawling up hill. Wish I had a lower gear. The 350 is a six speed so I think it would be better in those situations.

    The other thing I notice is the balance. You take a 500 lb bike, add 150 lbs of crap, and meh... Add that 150 to a tall bike that weighs 360 and it feels very top heavy and a bit tipsy at low speed. The panniers actually help it, but all the weight on the top back is very noticeable. Makes the steering at high speed a little squirrelly; not enough weight on the front, even with the big gas tank. Is it a problem? Not really, you just notice it when you're putting heavy input into the steering, like countersteering to avoid potholes. I wouldn't want it to be any worse. Being that the 350 is lighter, you may need to consider how you're going to get more weight on the front.

    Less weight is better when you drop it! Because it's tipsy I dropped it once in a parking lot. Picking it up was a bear. Next time I'll just take some bags off before I pick it up.

    Hope that helps you make a decision.
    #90
  11. snobear

    snobear Been here awhile

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Saskatchewan Canada
    Yes any info like this from someone actually there doing the trip is a great help, I am currently on a second 650 Vstrom and have made four trips to the Yukon, Alaska, NWT and Tuk last year and know I want something smaller going south. I will be faithfully following your reports as they come in.
    #91
  12. Veselko

    Veselko Adventurer Supporter

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    Someone once said, the best bike for the trip is the one you have... lol There's probably some truth to that, especially if you're on a budget. Bikes have become so specialized, we forget that at one time there were just bikes... no dual sports, no enduros, no cruisers, no choppers, no interstates... we think we need a different one for every kind of road, but the fact is any bike today can probably do it all. I once saw a story about a chick that took her CBR600 sport bike across the United States... off road... deep sand... mud... She got there. I look at the DR's and I see just an improved general purpose bike; highway, dirt, corner carving, does them all well enough. The Vstrom is similar. Obviously you've put it through it's paces and you're still going.

    If I followed that guys advice I'd be on a 2007 Bandit 1250. Who knows, it might have worked, but I would have had to been a lot more careful with my ground clearance. Some of the crappy roads, and even some of those Mexican speed bumps, are kind of ridiculous. I could see bashing the bottom of my bike on some of those if I didn't have the ground clearance and suspension travel of the DR. When I chose the DR my main considerations were; simple (air cooled, carbureted), relatively light, and capable of anything within reason. KISS. It's just insurance, and like any insurance you hope you don't need it. I don't want to be in the middle of nowhere and have something go wrong, without a clue what's wrong or how to fix it.

    It's just a matter of how much insurance you want and how much money you have to play with. Having choices is awesome!
    #92
  13. Veselko

    Veselko Adventurer Supporter

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    The road to Campeche. Took the slightly longer way along the Gulf Coast. Mostly straight as an arrow. Some nice scenery along the coast. Lots of pelicans here and there dive bombing for fish. Few small towns with lots of grass roof restaurants. Lots of empty beachfront.

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    The adhesive on that water bottle label just melted... Heat index 100 in the shade.

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    It was hot and humid. My ass was tired and hungry. Needed to feed it some avocado to settle it down.

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    Ahhhh... the open road beckons... and so does that cold shower...
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    I got settled in and then the afternoon storm hit... No locked gates here. Getting a much needed rinse.

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    The place I'm staying is kind of falling short. They said they had a kitchen... no stove... And someone else's hair is in my bed... but what do you want for $11/night... Ok, getting warm in here, need to find the remote for the AC unit and turn it down... :thumb
    #93
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  14. Veselko

    Veselko Adventurer Supporter

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    Took a ride out to Edzna', a Calakmul city, about 40 minutes Southwest of Campeche. It was inhabited from about 200-600 BC to 1500 AD. Out in the middle of nowhere, which makes a good place to visit and skip the crowds at some of the more popular sites in the Peninsula. It's a little bit of a walk... the heat and the bugs, even at 10:30 am... whew...

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    That grass field is about 40 feet up from the ground; the second level of the temple.

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    Also, where I'm staying is about 15 minutes out of town, by vehicle, and I just can't bear to go walk the town when it's 90's, high humidity, and sun beating down... whew... but I rode to the store and the town is quite modern. Main run along the coast looks really new, there's not one, but two Walmart's in town (Funny how in Mexico having a Walmart is upscale and signifies the place is on the map, yet in the states so many people look down on Walmart. Say what you will, it's the one place stop and shop!), Burger King, all sorts of restaurants and shops. Several very fancy looking hotels along the main road. And apparently all sorts of things to do for those that want to do all sorts of things. Two nights is definitely not long enough to get a feel for the place.
    #94
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  15. roadcapDen

    roadcapDen Ass, Grass or Gas, no free rides.

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    Good stuff, keep on Truckin'!
    #95
  16. Veselko

    Veselko Adventurer Supporter

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    I'maaaa truckin'!

    Campeche to Hunucma'... it's a pretty straight inland shot. Mostly four laner, some two laner. Hunucma' is about 20k people. Decided I didn't want to hassle with Marida, which is significantly bigger, and I'm only 25 minutes from the coast. Maybe take a ride that way tomorrow while I'm here.

    And the tree and shrub lined road reads to a green and red gate of the casa blanca. Nice place. Tough they have that issue with understanding what's outside and what's inside and keeping them separate. There's two ports in the living room wall... no glass, no screen... and I won't be using any lights tonight in the front room cause I'll attract every bug in the neighborhood. The bedroom is pretty well sealed up, and there's a gecko running around... I kid you not... hopefully he eats all the bugs... fast bugger too... so just keeping that room sealed up. In the mean time my shirt is soaked, and I'm sitting under a ceiling fan, cause there's no air. Working well enough (heat index was 108). Hopefully it cools off enough that I wont be sleeping in a wet shirt.

    And dinner is in the pot cooking away nicely... some rice with cabbage, carrots, and sweet potatoes... Aaaaand, right across the street is a tortilleria... a lady who makes and sells fresh corn tortillas... a bag for 10 pesos... like $0.52... Yum, and she puts something in them cause my lips are a little spicy after eating them.

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    That green door is steel, about 1.5" thick, it has two deadbolts, and latches that go up into the ceiling and down into the floor. You would need a tank to get through it... but about 10 feet away is a port in the wall, about two foot in diameter, that anyone could crawl through... no glass, nada... :hmmmmm

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    The rooftop view ain't bad. Owner says it's really nice up there at night... apparently the breeze keeps the bugs away.
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    #96
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  17. Veselko

    Veselko Adventurer Supporter

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    Yeah, so the rooftop view in the evening didn't work out so well... no breeze and lots of bugs...
    But I did get a pic of the Gecko in my room!

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    Extra point if you know what this is...
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    It's half of a different Gecko, that apparently wasn't fast enough the last time someone closed a window... :pep:doh

    Ok, got my ass up pretty early and took a 25 minute ride to the coast; Sisal Yucatan. Took a cruise up and down the main strip, and a little ways out I saw how the other 1% of Mexicans live... in big house on the beachfront... nice...

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    Circled around a bit more and found this entrance to the beach just a block from the main street that leads to the beach.

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    Yup that will do... and the place was empty...

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    The water was somewhere around 80 degrees. Just wade in and float away... Just a slight breeze, and gentle waves... more like big ripples... After a couple hours of sunning and swimming, and some more people arriving (20 tops), figured enough for one day.

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    I rode back into town, stopped at the market, exchanged some money at the bank, walked around a bit.
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    Yes, so there's a lot of these three wheel things roaming around. Two wheels in back, motorcycle front end. There's also the type where the riding area is in front and the motorcycle is in the back. And there's the pedal kind. No Tuk Tuk's. It was funny to watch these things go down the street. One had the shaft with the drive sprocket all the way out, and a chain connecting it to the outside of one of the back wheels. One clearly needed an alignment cause the bike part was kind of leaning over... Not a lot of cars.

    I don't know about those two people in the photo. One is walking like Igor and the other one looks like she's about to dodge a line backer... fake left go right...

    Here's a couple crops of the gizmos above...
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    Small bustling town, just like the others. And for a 25 minute drive, can't beat that beach... hidden jewel... only one road in and same road out.

    And that's all she wrote for today cause the heat index is back up to 107... I'm a going to wet my t-shirt again and sit under a fan.
    #97
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  18. Veselko

    Veselko Adventurer Supporter

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    Rode from Hunucna" to just outside Valladolid... whew... Even at 55 mph the breeze wasn't enough to keep me cool... Heat index 110... wet my shirt and barely felt it... ATGATT and +110 = ATHATT (all the heat all the time).

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    Coming out of Hunucna' all straight four lane, no shade. Slimmed down to a tree lined two lane and then like a land and a half, cause mother nature was taking the road back.

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    That was a nice shady tree next to what seemed an oasis in the middle of nowhere.

    Last few days it's been a literal killing field. Lots of butterflies on all the roads. Trying to dodge them with my head, cause they make a nice splat. But today they were everywhere. Flying across the roads in clumps. At one point I started putting my hand up in front of myself to deflect them from my shield. And they were laying dead on the roadway.

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    Behind bars again!

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    And yeah, that's a papaya tree in the yard... I may just be able to pick one if I stand on the wall just below the tree... Tomorrow. It's storming now.

    So, As I'm going down some of these back roads, I come across very small, seemingly very poor towns. I don't know how people live there. I use to wonder that about all the little towns in the US, but no more. Got me thinking about the Utopian society. You know, seeking the perfect existence, in a well managed society where everything is taken care of. No suffering, everyone has what they need, and they are free to pursue their interests. If you take it all the way guess you wouldn't need "job" or money.

    When I compare the state of many Mexican towns to places in the US, I think the US in many ways is closer to the Utopian society... things are generally taken care of. Not for everyone, but for most people. Or are they? Certainly there are pockets... Like Boulder, where I stayed for 9 months. College town, culture, arts, well maintained streets, generally peaceful, traffic doesn't get too out of control, most people drive nice cars, pedestrians have the right of way, if you need something there's a handful of stores where you're likely to find it, plenty of things to do including nightlife, outdoor life... you name it. But it costs, and only the one's with money can afford it. Houses are upward of $450k, which is not bad considering all that you get in the area, but it's unaffordable for many. So, it certainly falls short of Utopia, because not all who want it can have it.

    But how does the road to Utopia start? I look and I see silly little three wheeled car/bike contraptions, tuk-tuk's, trucks spewing thick black exhaust, chicken buses (which are just renovated school buses), stores that sell prepackaged processed foods, and I think this is sad. The other day I was offered a drink, I asked what it was, it was a mixture of Coke, Squirt, and something else I can't remember... ah.. no, thanks, I'll stick with my water. Is it sad? Yeah, it's sad that corporations are pushing that stuff, when for thousands of years these people have lived a simple, healthy, lifestyle. But if you want progress, somewhere along the way you're going to get buses that belch black smoke, right? And people are going to get taken advantage of by those who can and want to. Until they wise up.

    I also see that many people, who don't have a pot to piss in, have cell phones. Especially the kids. No different than anywhere else I guess... cell phone companies pushing their wares, convincing you you need what they have. How do they afford it? Even in these tiny little one horse or two tuk-tuk towns. But I guess the good that comes out of that is communication and access to information. And if you have information, it's not so easy for someone to pull the wool over your eyes. So, maybe today they're all eating Dorito's and drinking Squirt, but some day they're find that information that says it's not good for them. It's out there.

    So, seems to me, whether Utopia is a good thing or bad, that's kind of where everything is going, or at least striving for. Will we get there? I don't know. But I see that starting on that road can be really really messy at first, and I get to see that messiness first hand. And that's why 6000 miles from where I use to hang my hat, I can pull into a town I've never been in, where people speak a different language, and reserve a house that has air conditioning, when it's 110 outside. And the owner can arrange for me to meet his daughter in the parking lot of an Oxxo (convenience store) and we can talk, and she can work my Google Maps to show me the location of the house, and she can pull up a photo of the house so I know what I'm looking for.

    Nope, things will never be the same. This thing called progress is on a march and it's not stopping, for better or worse.

    And I wish it wasn't raining out so I could go buy some tortillas at the tortallaria. I wonder if they delivery yet? Is there an Uber here? :lol3
    #98
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  19. Veselko

    Veselko Adventurer Supporter

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    CO
    Bummer, can't reach the papaya's...

    Took a walk to the local tiendas to see what kind of food I could find. I'm a happy man, I found a corn tortilla supplier! And they're soft, so toss them on the burner for a couple minutes to get warm and toasty. Muy bien. Walked 1.5 miles and I'm sweating my ass off by the time I came back... did I mention it's hot and humid here... at 9:45 in the morning.

    Everyone down the street has a life sentence, with no possibility of parole... the houses are about 12 feet wide and 30 feet long. Ok, guess that's bigger than a jail cell... I wonder if this is where the tiny house concept got started? But what more do you need? A place to sleep where you can turn the A/C to 30 and have it feel cool, a place to cook and eat, a bathroom with an electrocuting (I mean electrically heated) shower (yeah, that will wake you up, just enough current), maybe a spot with a roof for the motorcycle.

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    The hardships of life on the road, I have to eat my lightly roasted and cooked oatmeal with a serving spoon...
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    And I discovered yesterday that Amazon does ship to Mexico addresses! Shipping and import fees but you can get what you need! Since I'll be in one spot for a few weeks I'm taking the opportunity to replace the items that aren't making the cut. In my case a charging chord for the camera, cause I frog got it, a new waterproof shock proof case for the phone, and a new cell phone holder for the bike.

    Yeah, the case is a disappointment because I bought a good one. Shock proof, water proof, but the plastic screen protector is scratched and rough and the water plug for the charging port broke off cause the rubber cracked, and when the case falls (and I have dropped it) it opens up partially (can't take the impact). It did make it through snow and rain storms, but not good enough for a Butterfinger!

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    The phone holder has got multiple issues also, little pads on the holding arms are lose and sticky and the ball and socket are loose even though I've got it cranked down all the way. Guess I'd be a good product test case on this trip, bouncing around the world and all...

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    And, Motocity here in Mexico is shipping my new tires to arrive in a week. My front still has tread on it but the rubber is showing signs of cracking and the rear is done. I have Heidenau K60's, but I don't like the front. As the tire leans there is an area where there's basically no tread, just groove. Not very well planned out for a street/dirt tire. Going to try the Michelin Siracs, just a little less aggressive, but the front doesn't have the same issue.

    Just replaced my font brake pads yesterday, and it's time for another oil change when I get the tires installed.
    #99
    Drybones and Dirt Road Cowboy like this.
  20. Veselko

    Veselko Adventurer Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2017
    Oddometer:
    87
    Location:
    CO
    Took the longer way to Puerto Morelos through Tulum. There was more butterfly killing today... and more garbage by the roadside, on the way to utopia...

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    Arriving in Tulum was a shock. Saw a couple billboards for hotel suits upwards of $130,000 pesos... Wow! That's like $6000? Leading into it and everything north of it is four land highway. People driving way too fast to get wherever it's urgent they get to... You can just sense the change in attitude when you get to a more modern, touristy, city like this.

    Another hot and humid day. Pulled over under a bridge to get some shade and have a snack, and watch traffic zoom by.

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    Thought I'd have a good view of the Ocean going North, but no. Road is too far away from the beach and there are all these huge, gated, resorts between the road and the beach. The resort land is fenced in and they actually have makeshift guard towers along the fence, I guess where they look to make sure no one is sneaking over the fence and onto their beach... Billboards everywhere with all sorts of attractions being advertised... some more risque than others...

    I got into Puerto Morelos, which isn't that big, so just did a circle around the main strip. Along with the restaurants and shops I came on this. Morelos is actually one of the major ports in Mexico, where they load and unload containers from ships.

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    A storm was coming in so I headed to my digs for the night. Gated in again?

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    And another 12 x 30 ft home.

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    Fruit and two beers in the fridge included... Nice!

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    Veggies in the pot and cooking for dinner.

    Tomorrow morning off to the airport to pick up my honey, chill out for a couple weeks, discover the town, enjoy the beach, and discuss the plan going forward! It's going to be interesting...