Vintage Motocross Triumph, Old Guy Build.

Discussion in 'Some Assembly Required' started by Nemosengineer, Sep 4, 2017.

  1. Nemosengineer

    Nemosengineer Hair Ball Supporter

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    I feel the need for more equipment... So I'm considering a bead blast cabinet, to run either soda, plastic, or glass beads. The most likely candidate is the "Barrel Blaster" made in Texas for about $300.
    I looked at the Harbor Freight cabinet for $200 and I think it's worth the extra $100 for the "Barrel Blaster" just so I dont have to assemble the Harbor Freight cabinet, it looks like a real pain in the ass to put together.

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    And a dust separator... $100 (eBay). with a decent shop vac I think I could be operational for under $500.
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    Or under $700 with a quality gun, foot pedal, metering valve and regulator
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    That got out of control in a hurry...
    Let me know what you think???

    : Mike
    #81
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  2. huub

    huub Been here awhile

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    i've already got the bead blasting cabinet, and basically if i would invest now save up bit more and buy a vapor/wet blast cabinet.
    those produce no dust, so it can be set up in a workshop where you work on engines. and finish is much nicer.
    the normal bead blast cabinets make a mess of your workshop ( yes , i've got a dust seperator and big shop vac, but you cant avoid opening the cabinet....)

    this looks promising
    http://wildguzzi.com/forum/index.php?topic=90483.0
    #82
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  3. Beezer

    Beezer Long timer Supporter

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    the biggest problem is having a compressor that will drive it...
    #83
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  4. Nemosengineer

    Nemosengineer Hair Ball Supporter

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    Hi Hubb,
    I would really like a vapor blast cabinet but I can't justify the cost, as a turnkey system is about $3K. But I'm lucky that there is a local vapor blast business (10 minutes away) that will rent their equipment on a DIY basis for $40 an hour. These guys...
    https://vaporblastingusa.com/
    But I still want a blast cabinet for less critical finishes like my new 1972 Husqvarna CR 400 hub for the Triumph which just needs cleaning, a fresh coat of black paint and new bearings and seals.

    I have a 72 CR 250 brake but the CR 400 uses a bigger front axle and the drum is over an inch larger in diameter, this hub shares a lot of parts with the rear hub like brake shoes and springs and EBC makes an excellent replacement shoe for for the early Husqvarna's.
    [​IMG]

    : Mike
    #84
  5. Nemosengineer

    Nemosengineer Hair Ball Supporter

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    Hi Beezer,
    I believe I have the compressor covered as this one can do 5.3 SCFM at 90 psi and its fairly quiet, the Solberg filter housings and Lucas synthetic compressor oil made a noticeable improvement in recovery time.

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    Because I can't leave anything alone, regulation and controls upgrades are in the works along with oversized compressor discharge lines and tank unloader valve.

    [​IMG]
    A blast cabinet metering valve should go a long toward improving the efficiency of blasting with different medias as you control the abrasive flow to air ratio at lower blast pressures.

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    With a matching gun and a few different nozzle tips I hope to build a fairly decent system that will work well with my existing compressor.

    : Mike
    #85
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  6. huub

    huub Been here awhile

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    nice compressor! i've got a huge one, it was so big and heavy the previous owner of our house did not care to remove it , so i got it for free
    being able to bead blast parts yourself makes restaurations a lot easier.
    #86
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  7. villageidiot

    villageidiot Long timer Supporter

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    [​IMG]

    this is my favorite finish on alloy.

    glass bead blasted and then tumbled in a media/solvent tumbler. love the low sheen, and smooth, and doesn't fingerprint.

    I'm lucky in that i don't have to have the tumbler equipment (yet) as my friend that does starters and alternators has one, he's getting close to retiring, so who knows after that happens. but his is big enough for valve covers and intake logs.

    [​IMG]
    #87
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  8. Beezer

    Beezer Long timer Supporter

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    where I used to work we ran the glass bead at 40 psi max... higher pressures destroy the beads too quick. I wanna say 8scfm to run the rig but... not sure 100%... think so though
    #88
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  9. Nemosengineer

    Nemosengineer Hair Ball Supporter

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    Finally... Somthing project related.
    At this point the primary drive is complete with the final pieces showing up a few hours ago.

    The SRM thrust bearing pressure plate, clutch retaining washer and nut, and a new OEM primary chain tensioner assembly.
    [​IMG]

    And to continue with the festival of spending money, I ordered a proper English made race bike magneto, the Electrex World P/N STX-012D A self generating digital internal rotor kit, this also completes the wiring harness. I really like this kit as it has a sporty electronic advance curve built into it, replaces everything that has Lucas printed on it, and it saves a few pounds. I'm considering using the vacant cavity that is left from not using the advance mechanism and points plate as the new exit for the crankcase breather, details to follow.

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    The cam chest is almost complete, the exception being a Morgo oil pump that is on backorder from the manufacturer. I am ordering a lot of this stuff directly from England, from the manufacturers as it's a lot less expensive, I saved a substantial amount buying this way as it seems the U.S. vendors are marking this stuff way up.

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    That's all for now: Mike
    #89
  10. Nemosengineer

    Nemosengineer Hair Ball Supporter

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    Things are moving along briskly, I found a frame and bought it, a 1967 Triumph TR6R Trophy with... Patina :jack.
    Ok, A bit of rust, about 50% maybe, but its all there, main frame, subframe, swingarm and a few bits for eBay. Its not in bad condition for being 50 years old, the forward tank mount is there and straight, the steering stops are both there and look ok, the frame hasn't been hacked, all the tabs and brackets are there even the factory seat latch. It should be in my garage in a week or so, then off to the sandblaster for a nice soothing grit bath and a quick coat of etching primer.

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    More to follow: Mike
    #90
  11. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    Very interesting build! I am always impressed with these that go from an idea, through a lot of research and parts acquisition, to a fantastic finish! :thumb
    #91
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  12. Nemosengineer

    Nemosengineer Hair Ball Supporter

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    Hi Jim,
    Thanks for that, I am enjoying this build a lot, it's nice to build something period that shows its age. An example would be this Webco rocker box oil feed manifold, its a nice piece but it has some nicks and scratches that tell a story of its past that I didn't want to lose by over working the part when restoring, it still has its ripples form a less than perfect polish job from when it was made. The finish is satin, as will be all the covers that were originally polished.

    Before.
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    After.
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    Have a great Thanksgiving: Mike
    #92
  13. Nemosengineer

    Nemosengineer Hair Ball Supporter

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    My magneto arrived and here is a crappy photo of it, I am pleased with its construction and its very lightweight.
    [​IMG]

    I have wasted most of the day doing photo research on 1963 to 1973 English MX and trials bikes looking for weight savings and trying to further refine the "look". Anytime you assemble a mix of parts the risk is you can end up with something that appears really out of context, easy to do when screwing with one of the world's most iconic motorcycles.
    [​IMG]
    The BSA works bikes and the Victor GP are good inspiration as far as how to manage the gaps from a short fuel tank and a stubby seat, I very much like the way the bike sets and the fender clearances. A good classic look.
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    To my eye this is a good use of black and I like the silver frame.
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    I like this, it has the "look".
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    : Mike
    #93
  14. more koolaid

    more koolaid Been here awhile

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    ef15f9c6144b91aa959baca9f00d7f54.jpg
    That is a looker !
    #94
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  15. Nemosengineer

    Nemosengineer Hair Ball Supporter

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    Things I have acquired in yesterday's marathon shopathon.
    Alloy engine mounting plates
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    An early (pre 1965) brake pedal (10 bucks, Woot) that runs the brake rod outside of the frame for easy maintenance. The later models run inside the frame and put the brake linkage in the roost zone (it goes in the pile of parts that are going to the platers to get the chrome stripped). The plans for this is to cut off the footpad and fit one from the BSA B50 MX.
    [​IMG]

    Things in work...
    The Husqvarna CR400 big front brake, I started to clean things up and ordered new EBC brake shoes for front and rear. Blast and powder coat to follow. Comparison photo of the CR400 vs the CR250 brake, the CR 400 also uses a larger axle. State of the art 1972.
    [​IMG]

    Planning activities... If you ignore everything in this photo except the frame, engine, and oil tank, you will get a good idea of where the bike is going. This layout is a almost a 1 for 1 analog of what I'm building. The wedge oil tank was required for the long intake manifolds I'm using with VM Mikunis and long oval K&N air filters. I'm lusting after the rectangular steel swingarm that's on this bike, I will try to find one. I also like the silver frame.
    [​IMG]

    : Mike
    #95
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  16. Vince

    Vince Long timer

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    I thought I had mentioned it here earlier but it was on the Triumph double engine drag bike thread, I thought the big thing when I was Triumph addicted was the new Morgo 4 valve oil pump that got them running cooler. The drag bike couldn't run them being pre-unit, is that a pic earlier if the 4 valve pump or an uprated 2 valve.
    #96
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  17. Nemosengineer

    Nemosengineer Hair Ball Supporter

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    Hi Vince.
    [​IMG]
    The 4 valve pump is a Triumph pump first used in 1980 on the T140E and T140ES. The check valves are redundant, the idea was the new pump would control wet sumping in parked motorcycles (a condition common to dry sump machines, in which gravity feeds oil out of the oil tank & through the oil pump, filling up the crankcase while the motorcycle is sitting for long periods). The pump pistons are the same size as the previous generation of pumps, so no advantage for me.
    The photo I had previously posted is the 2 valve Morgo pump, Triumph made the 4 valve pump and it's being copied by a lot of countries as the OEM 4 valve stock dried up a long time ago, to by knowledge Morgo did not make a 4 valve pump. The advantage of the Morgo for me is just peace of mind, knowing that its machined correctly and their great reputation.

    : Mike
    #97
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  18. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    #98
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  19. r60man

    r60man Long timer

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    A big issue with the stock type pumps is the brass body/steel pistons. I once had a small piece of debris chew up the brass body pretty badly. It pumped, but only enough to make the light go out. We found it because I noticed that it was not pumping as vigorously out of the top of the frame. (Something my father insisted I check every time I rode.
    #99
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  20. Nemosengineer

    Nemosengineer Hair Ball Supporter

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    Hi Nickguzzi,
    The Morgo rotary pump is a great unit if your use matches its capabilities, it's advantages are it will move large quantities of hot thinned oil for something like road racing use, makes great pressure, and the scavenge side of the pump will return a quart and a half of oil to the tank a minute. To run this pump correctly oil system modifications are required. to the oil pressure relief valve (drilling more holes in the relief passage), removing the restrictor from the oil tank return line, and other detail changes.
    My decision for not using one is its sort of overkill for my application, and I dont like that the oil pressure relief valve is always open and dumping oil back to the sump, It takes horsepower to drive the pump and return all that sump oil to the oil tank so its not efficient, for my application where I'm lining up on a starting line with a cold engine it makes more sense to use the piston pump. That being said If I were going road racing I would use the rotary pump.

    The joys of British engineering are never ending, but riding any of the big British roadsters has always put a smile on my face.


    : Mike
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