Vintage Motocross Triumph, Old Guy Build.

Discussion in 'Some Assembly Required' started by Nemosengineer, Sep 4, 2017.

  1. Vince

    Vince Been here awhile

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    Oct 1, 2006
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    932
    And my 64 Bonnie had all that plus Cycle thread, 26 tpi. Try finding that. I ended up using 6-inch finely threaded shifting spanner a lot. I don't own any spanners except metric now so I don't get tempted again.
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  2. Salsa

    Salsa Long timer

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    In the 50's at a foreign car place a friend of mine said:

    If it is a Harley --- Use American tools
    If it is British --- Whitworth tools
    If it is German --- Use Metric tools
    If it is Italian --- Empty the whole damn tool box on the bench !!!!

    Don
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  3. motu

    motu Loose Pre Unit

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    When the British changed to Unified Threads the big players changed by the mid '50's - so a 1952 Morris Minor was Whitworth, a 1956 Morris Minor was SAE. But it was a big tooling cost, and some couldn't make the change overnight and dragged a complete change out over a couple of decades. Starting my apprenticeship in 1970, we were still working on cars from the 50's, so whitworth was pretty common, and I needed tools to work on what was out there. Then metric came along...again, a slow change, in this case it was the USA that dragged it's heels about making a change.

    Here we mainly get Japanese cars and bikes now, and mechanics I sometimes work with get upset when they work on a Euro car, all the stupid size spanners and sockets they need. No, it's not the Euro cars that are different, it's the Japanese. The Euros use ISO, or SI, the international system, the Japanese use JIS, the Japanese Industrial Standard. We still haven't got the whole world using the same system.
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  4. beza dave

    beza dave n00b

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  5. beza dave

    beza dave n00b

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    This dude eats to much Acid.
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  6. Nemosengineer

    Nemosengineer Hair Ball Supporter

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    [​IMG]

    Last mockup photo before I breakout the cutoff wheel and detab the frame, and send the aluminum oil tank to the platers to have the chrome stripped. I kind of feel bad for butchering this frame as all the tabs, brackets, and castings are untouched and are in really nice condition.
    Things I'm cutting off are, the side stand bracket, the center stand brackets and return spring mount, the steering lock bracket, possibly the steering stop brackets, the fairing mounts on the steering head, all the original fuel tank brackets, the electric and coil mount under the fuel tank the sidecar lug (the big round part just ahead of the upper subframe mount), the passenger peg mounts and battery box/oil tank/seat mount and other stuff mounts on the subframe and frame. This should amount to a weight savings of about 3 lbs, not much but every bit adds up, the goal is a dry weight of 300 lbs.
    [​IMG]

    The smaller tank will leave a gap between the tank and seat which I will manage like the BSA works Victor shown below. This is the general look I'm going for, kind of state of the art 1968. I might consider black paint for the oil tank so it just sort of blends into the background.
    [​IMG]

    The wedge shaped oil tank was a necessity as my engine is dual carb with 3 inch long intake manifolds, which as you can see in the photo below (stock framed Triumph vintage dirt track bike with a similar oil tank and intake arrangement) takes up a lot of space.
    [​IMG]

    The early Triumph frames were fairly bomb proof as they were up to the task of TT racing at ascot Park.
    [​IMG]

    : Mike
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  7. Beezer

    Beezer Long timer Supporter

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    some of the "braze-on" lugs they used were.... ah.... brazed on. usually pinned and brazed. drill the pin, heat the lug, give it a twist and a slug. bet that sidestand thing is one.... the bottom engine mount reinforcements too. the braze-ons were castings, most of your tabs look welded

    if you don't care about the parts, run the cut off wheel down the side of the fitting until you see the braze the full length, then heat & beat. off there in 5 minutes

    can't weld over braze you know
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  8. beza dave

    beza dave n00b

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2016
    Oddometer:
    7
    After years of fixing broken kick stand lugs, fixing bike with no kick stands, I don't think I'll ever cut one off again. All my race bikes have their kick stand lugs on them but one.

    Cheers. To each his own.
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  9. Nemosengineer

    Nemosengineer Hair Ball Supporter

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    Hi Beezer,
    Excellent advice as always, the frame is about 50/50 between braze and weld, weld being all the structural tabs and bosses, braze mostly lugs and almost everything attached to the subframe.
    I have been living at work lately so other than shopping for parts no real progress has been made.
    I have a bicycle riding buddy who builds brazed lugged bicycle frames, an absolute wizard with a torch. He has agreed to do tabs, brackets, and detail work, in exchange for quality scotch and materials for the project, win win.
    I have two weeks off starting at Christmas so I hope to make some real progress.

    : Mike
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  10. Nemosengineer

    Nemosengineer Hair Ball Supporter

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    Gas cap overhaul in a lot of photos and few words.

    Not looking to good in there.
    [​IMG]

    3/32 Viton is the answer for a replacement gasket, Buna-N is not an option with alcohol based fuels.
    [​IMG]

    Vinegar works wonders.
    [​IMG]

    Looking a lot better.
    [​IMG]

    All Done.
    [​IMG]

    : Mike
  11. Nemosengineer

    Nemosengineer Hair Ball Supporter

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    This has been a productive week, I have signed up Emig Racing to build the custom triple clamps for the Triumph. This was an easy decision as Gary Emig is one of the very few people will build custom clamps to requested geometries for unusual combinations of parts. This makes the entire Husqvarna CR 400 front end a bolt on. What I'm getting is a set of clamps with a 7 mm reduction in offset from the standard Husky clamps, this reduces trail and gets rid of the tendency to push in corners. This is not my idea, Profab built reduced trail clamps in the 70's for Husqvarnas, I just stole their geometry.

    An example of Emig Racing's work.
    [​IMG]

    I broke down and bought a shiny thing, a real Gunnar Gasser throttle.
    [​IMG]

    The next shiny things will be a set of forged Spanish AMAL levers, they pull the correct amount of wire to keep the Triumph clutch happy.
    [​IMG]

    And I also ordered a un-shiny thing, an 18 tooth gearbox sprocket (Triumph P/N 57-4784 the smallest gearbox sprocket you can get for the 5 speed transmission) modified in house by Matt at Speed & Sport to take 520 chain, great service there.
    [​IMG]

    : Mike
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  12. Beezer

    Beezer Long timer Supporter

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    nice! ! like it lots
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  13. Nemosengineer

    Nemosengineer Hair Ball Supporter

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    I woke up this morning and wondered why I spent Saturday rolling around rolling around on the garage floor in the swarf, so today I grabbed my bicycle stand and clamped the Triumph frame into it, works like a champ and today I'm much cleaner. I should be able to finish the sub frame tomorrow, my Christmas present to my self :hmmmmm.
    [​IMG]

    These pins are a real pain to file flush with out nicking the tubing and there freeking everywhere, but there is a trick...
    [​IMG]

    The trick is cut it close with a cutoff wheel then wrap the tube with duct tape and you wont leave unintentional file strikes everywhere. By the time your dragging your file through the tape the nub is short enough to peel the tape and finish file longitudinally with the tube without leaving marks.
    [​IMG]

    Somewhere there is a Triumph restoration guy thinking "WTF DID YOU DO THAT FOR!!!".
    [​IMG]

    Merry Christmas: Mike :wave
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  14. Honda-50

    Honda-50 Vet Lurker

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    SoCal since the beginning
    Man, that deserved a "Like" three times over!
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  15. Nemosengineer

    Nemosengineer Hair Ball Supporter

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    Wow, it really is Christmas...
    [​IMG]

    I steeped out my door and I had a few boxes, first up was McMaster-Carr with 12 inches of 4130 chrome molly tubing, 3/4", .080 wall. Next box was from Chop Source with some lovely 3/16 laser cut brackets, that assemble like this...
    [​IMG]

    To hold up the back end of my oil tank by attaching to the vibration mounts, and stiffen the sub frame, it also gives me a place to fit a third fender tab.
    [​IMG]

    And the third and final box from Amazon, brushes to clean my fuel and oil tanks, Pine-Sol does a great job of cleaning aluminum and gets red of the white powdery corrosion.
    [​IMG]

    That's all for now: Mike
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  16. budsboy

    budsboy I crashed the swing too. Supporter

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    I just finished reading this from the beginning, thank you for posting the details -- I'm in!
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  17. Beezer

    Beezer Long timer Supporter

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    dunno if you have seen these guys.... Flanders:

    http://www.flanderscables.com/

    having made my share of weird stuff I know its hard to find the right control cables. these guys have everything you need. all you have to have is a soldering iron. for throttle controls I have found that bicycle brake cable can work. each cable comes with 2 ends made, one will fit, cut off the other.
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  18. Nemosengineer

    Nemosengineer Hair Ball Supporter

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    Hi Beezer,
    Thank you for that very useful link, I have used Flanders bars on most of my street bikes but I never ventured into that section of the website, the selection is impressive and the price is right.
    Progress is good on the sub frame, I spent a few hours working the upper shock mounts back into shape, right now their looking good, nice and straight. My goal is to finish the work on the frame by Jan 2nd so I can get it to the sandblaster on the 3rd, wish me luck.

    Happy Holidays: Mike
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  19. Nemosengineer

    Nemosengineer Hair Ball Supporter

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    Thanks for your interest, I will try to keep things entertaining.

    : Mike
  20. Nemosengineer

    Nemosengineer Hair Ball Supporter

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    Well the sub frame was due to be done yesterday, but I got the flu instead and spent the whole day in bed. I woke up this morning feeling less like hell and made weapons grade mil spec coffee, this got me moving in a zombie like fashion and I drug my ass out to the garage.
    [​IMG]

    So I did about 4 hours of work in the span of 8 hours, this was due to the onset of zero warning diarrhea, this was no fun at all, however the bright side is there were no tragic accidents, just numerous close calls.
    The sub frame is done, tomorrow I will start on the main frame, this should take a few days.
    [​IMG]

    : Mike
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