Volvo M40 Transmission rebuild

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Zombie_Stomp, Dec 1, 2010.

  1. Zombie_Stomp

    Zombie_Stomp Aspiring human

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    This is intended as a photo guide supplement to the V Classics transmission article: http://www.vclassics.com/archive/tranreb.htm
    I recently blew 2nd gear in my M40 as I was shifting hard into 2nd.
    I removed the shifter from the interior of the car. I put the car on jack stands and crept under the car. I removed the 4 bolts from the driveshaft and the support bearing strap was removed and the driveshaft relocated as far to the rear of the car as possible. I jacked the rear of the transmission up slightly, and removed the transmission crossmember. Using 3/8" allen socket, extensions,air impact gun, breaker bar, and finally Dremel cutoff wheel on one that stripped to remove the 4 bolts from the bellhousing. I won't be using this transmission case because of the slight damage done to the mounting flange when I used the Dremel. I slid the transmission out, and in reverse order, installed a temporary replacement used working gearbox for now.
    With the old one out of the car and a spare I obtained in disassembled but good condition, I set out to make a better transmission out of good gears, and replace all bearings, worn parts, seals, and gaskets, and replace the rest of the driveline parts and rear main seal before reinstallment for a full driveline mechanical restoration.
    I started with the used, broken unit on the bench by draining it's murky, metal-laced contents:
    [​IMG]
    Lots of chips on the magnetic drain plug:
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    looking inside and cleaning the top:
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    We can see the damaged gear from here:
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    Cleaning the outside:
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    I used an impact gun on the driveshaft flange nut, but you can lock the gears by moving 2 of the shift rods at the same time and remove the nut by rachet instead. Then a puller can be used to remove the flange:
    [​IMG]
    Removal of the bearing cover, input shaft side:
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    Removal of the speedometer drive gear assembly retainer bolt, the gear assembly, then the rest of the output bearing cover bolts:
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    Remove the shift rods end cap cover on one end, then drive out the middle rod's tension pin to free the shift actuator from the shaft, and remove the rod. Remove the others by freeing them from their shift forks with the flathead set screws. I specially ground and extra screwdriver for these fasteners:
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    Next step is to drive out this long countershaft pin. We haven't been able to see the countershaft yet, but it needs to be freed before we can see it.
    The pin is visible here, and it is advised one mark the ends to distinguish which way it came out so it can be treassembled likewise. Not a problem for me, I haven't been able to get it out yet. I will need to eventually, becauase it looks to be the better of the two countershaft rods.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Trying to get it out to no avail using the steel driver rod I'd been using to drive it out:
    [​IMG]
    Now that the countershaft rod is out, it will drop the shaft inside slightly, allowing the mainshaft to separate. There will be a brass ring and some needle bearings that fall out.
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    Oh wow, I chunked 4 teeth off the countershaft, so that's what this feels and sounds like:
    [​IMG]
    With everything apart now, I check out the case numbers, which are slightly different:
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    That's it for now, two disassembled transmissions. Here is everything:
    [​IMG]
    Next time, we will inspect some parts and make a list of stuff, find out how much it costs, and place a parts order. Finally in phase 3, I'll show how I reassemble everything all the way through the installation, including some of the other parts of the driveline I'll be replacing.
    #1
  2. Zombie_Stomp

    Zombie_Stomp Aspiring human

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    Looking at the parts from the two different transmissions, the first thing we notice are that the two middle gears are chewed, and that the countershaft is missing 4 teeth. The countershaft and inner gears will definitely need to be taken from our spare transmission.
    [​IMG]
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    The input shaft steel synchro teeth are not much better on one than the other. One is more rough and pitted feeling, and the other is shiny and worn on the ridges as well, but in a smoother way.
    [​IMG]
    The bearings on these is better on the spare as far as the wiggle test, but the cage is cracked. It would be best to replace it regardless.
    [​IMG]
    So I know I have some good, usable synchros. Some are in better shape than others, but this spare is proving to be in good shape. Here are 3 of them I've removed so far, only one looks worn. That's over $200 in parts saved if I don't need to replace them.
    [​IMG]
    The shift rods and balls are a wear consideration. The rods from the spare look best, and the two reverse rods are about the same. The balls (only included with mine, spare tranny's missing) looked worn, so I'll buy some of those.
    [​IMG]
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    A side note, the speedometer drive gears have different numbers of teeth. I think my speedometer may be driving at a different rate with my temporary spare, and this might be why. The yellow one has 16 teeth, the green one has 17 teeth. irollmotors or hiperformanceautoservice have different ones available. The correct one likely has to be used with the corresponding output shaft gear. We'll see if those are interchangeable, and which one goes with my rearend for closest-to-correct speedometer gearing. If I'm going 10mph slower than displayed, it is possible that my whole speedo/odo is being overdriven, and I'm actually getting better MPG than calculable from the odo.
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    Ok, time to take apart the mainshaft. We'll note the bearings location in this photo first:
    [​IMG]
    With the mainshaft seapaated into 2 parts, we'll be taking apart the big end. The input shaft is only one solid gear anyway. Here's the first clip being removed from the end:
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    Note the location of the 3 tabs and their spring ring's orientation, this is as described by the vclassics manual:
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    synchro ring:
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    next gear:
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    spacer:
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    now there is a wave ring. It has both inward and helical spring pressure. That's why there are 2 large spacers on either side. It's like a lockwasher in shape. I ended up using some craftsman flat spreaders since the spreading points are angled and have no holes. With that jesus clip off, the other spacer can come off.
    [​IMG]
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    With the spacers and clips off, I could remove the next gear and synchro cone. This allowed acess to the spring for the 3 engaging "dogs", I believe they're called. There is a small bump on them not quite on center. The longer par faces rear, or to the right from our view.
    [​IMG]
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    The springs should be oriented in a mirror image of one another as to which dog they ar centered on, according to the vclassics manual. We're not sure yet if it matters what position of the possible 3, but it is unlikely.
    [​IMG]
    With these off and the synchro speed ring off, we are upon the solid locking part of the shaft. This is splined. it's not coming off, it's part of the shaft.
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    On the other side of things, there is the output bearing. It's our old bearing, so we can do what we want to it without damaging the other parts. I found on the shaft I disassembled first, this shaft was easily knocked out of the bearing with a few gentle taps from the deadblow hammer with the shaft in my lap and my other hand holding the aluminum output flange. It would not be the best idea to perform this operation with the flange resting halfway on a countertop or some such. If showing such signs of resistance, it would need to be pressed off. Otherwise, with the shaft knocked out, the speedometer drive gear is now floating inside the end. Then with the clip around the inside of the bearing out, I knocked the bearing easily from the aluminum flange with a socket centered on top of the speedo gear.
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    With everything apart, some of the synchos look kind of worn. Maybe it would be best to replace them anyway. Got to pay the price of a transmission that shifts like new. I can take my time if I like.
    [​IMG]
    The two places I found that stock these internals are http://hiperformanceautoservice.com/ and http://www.irollmotors.com/ I can do some price comparison shopping. I bought an Asco clutch disc today for $35.00 shipped on e-bay. The rest of the items I'll need are as follows, with price comparisons to come:
    -seal and gasket kit
    -input and output bearings
    -needle bearings for countershaft: 48 required
    -needle bearing end bushings: 4 required
    -needle bearings mainshaft: 14 required
    -engaging dogs: 6 required (or 3 big 3 small, update coming on this)
    -engaging dog springs: 4 required
    -synchros: 4 required
    -balls: 3 required
    -springs: 3 required
    -t-shaped spacers for one of the shift forks. 2 required.
    I looked up the parts on both Irollmotors and Hiperformance and the totals were $588 and $535 respectively for the parts listed above, except the Iroll motors list is incomplete. If i take only the less expensive parts from each and place 2 orders, I get a total of $532.58 for everything. If I take out the synchros, it is a more affordable $ 361.34. Are there less expensive ways of getting near-perfect synchros? I will probably go one step furter and refer to a local bearing supplier for those and see if it can be an even lower grand total. I'll take a sample pack of bearings with me tonight and their quantities to a local bearing supplier that I will look up.
    The all-brass fork may be a wear item, but one is a little better and neither seem at all worn in a way that affects performance. The gears themselves have brass or bronze plain bearings with dimples for oil to gather. I don't believe these need to be pressed out and replaced, but if someone knows where to buy replacements, I'll look into buying them. This may as well be a full remanufacture in which I replace all wear parts.
    Here are all the parts from out blown and spare transmission. If anyone knows a place with less expensive parts than iroll motors or hiperformanceautoservice, plese post a link.
    [​IMG]
    Now all that remains is for me to compile the price list, compare, place order, and carefully reassemble with the best of the best.
    #2
  3. Zombie_Stomp

    Zombie_Stomp Aspiring human

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    Perhaps some of you will be rocking some m40 canvas patches on the back of your jacket next- the Etsy store is still going strong with new photography and will be receiving new merchandise soon: http://www.etsy.com/shop/aGoGoDesigns
    And hey, I did this to my motorcycle several times anyway. It's easy when it's a machine you love.
    On with the show. I dropped by a local bearing supplier and got the main in and output shaft bearings today. Together, they cost about the same as one from the cheaper of the other suppliers of M40 rebuild goodies.
    The output bearing was easy. Simply line it up and tap it in along the outer edges with a deadblow hammer, indirectly via some sort of driver preferably. The amount of force required is not enough to damage the races, but that's not an issue if you stick to the outer race with some sort of spacer. It is also possible, and safer, to simply heat the output bearing/speedo drive housing with a torch to expand it so the bearing drops right in.
    [​IMG]
    I found out which shaft I'm using when I was inspecting the gears. The one from the damaged tranny had a little bit of gear tooth damage, mostly marring.
    The old bearing from the input shaft was a little more complicated. It doesn't matter if the old bearing gets damged. It's all about not damaging the shaft. I found a socket that fit nicely over the top and around the shaft, and tapped it gingerly, checking for clearance of the gear every 6 or so whaps.
    [​IMG]
    The new one was shielded on both sides whereas our original was only single shielded, so I pried off the shield on the correct side.
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    The bearing came with the outer snap ring groove in the right place. Next I heated the new bearing with the propane torch, especially on the inner race,and it dropped right on in it's expanded state. It only takes a temperature of about 350F to expand the metal enough to clear the tolerances.
    [​IMG]
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    ^Click for video^
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    Next I've got to track don the needle bearings locally if possible, the bearing supplier today said they were an unusual dimension.
    -seal and gasket kit
    X-input bearing
    X-output bearing
    -needle bearings for countershaft: 48 required
    -needle bearing end bushings: 4 required
    -needle bearings mainshaft: 14 required
    -engaging dogs: 6 required (or 3 big 3 small, update coming on this)
    -engaging dog springs: 4 required
    -synchros: 4 required
    -balls: 3 required
    -springs: 3 required
    -t-shaped spacers for one of the shift forks. 2 required.
    #3
  4. Zombie_Stomp

    Zombie_Stomp Aspiring human

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    Additional orders placed:
    X seal and gasket kit
    X Input bearing
    X output bearing
    -needle bearings for countershaft: 48 required
    x countershaft needle bearing spacers: 4 req'd.
    -needle bearings mainshaft: 14 required
    -engaging dogs: deemed uneccessary
    -engaging dog springs: 4 required
    X synchros: 4 required
    X balls: 3 required
    X springs: 3 required
    X t-shaped spacers for one of the shift forks. 2 required.
    This just in: LAYSHAFT (inner rod only), 1 REQUIRED! They are both pitted on the bearing surface due to case hardened skin delaminating. It is an even bigger patch on the rod I thought would be the good one, but deeper on the other one. In any case, it'll be neccessary to set aside another $90 to that: Iroll has the cheapest one. Fortunately around the same time, I realize that the guide does not say that the 6 locating keys are a wear item, so there's $30 off the price.
    Looks like I should be assembled in a week's time according to my forecast.
    #4
  5. Zombie_Stomp

    Zombie_Stomp Aspiring human

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    Lord have mercy, the parts keep piling up. Today I drove the layshaft rod out and discovered more pitting/case hardening delamination, so I calle up Galen to ask for the spare m40 of his. He said the input bearing was screaming. That may be the case, but the rod out of his was worse than mine, actually the whole surface of his was kind of flattened in the problem area. Must be a lot of load there. While I was at Galen's, I picked up a silicone-updated design rear engine seal flange, a pair of brake shoes, and a clutch alignment tool, so the trip was well spent. The rest of the internals may yield a workng spar ebetween what I've got in the car now and itself, but with these layshafts being the way they are, I'll bet it'll need a new one of those at the time of rebuild too. As Glaen and I chatted, I realized I need a pilot bearing and a throwout bearing while I'm at it. So add those to the list. Everything else is ordered and paid for today.
    [​IMG]
    -throwout bearing (1)
    -pilot bearing (1)
    -layshaft rod (1)
    X seal and gasket kit
    X Input bearing
    X output bearing
    xneedle bearings for countershaft: 48 required
    x countershaft needle bearing spacers: 4 req'd.
    xneedle bearings mainshaft: 14 required
    xengaging dogs: deemed uneccessary
    xengaging dog springs: 4 required
    X synchros: 4 required
    X balls: 3 required
    X springs: 3 required
    X t-shaped spacers for one of the shift forks. 2 required.
    #5
  6. Zombie_Stomp

    Zombie_Stomp Aspiring human

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    All parts are ordered. Here's the list.
    Mc Guire Bearing:
    -input bearing
    -output bearing
    $30.41 local supplier
    Swedish treasures:
    -mainshaft needle bearings
    -countershaft or Layshaft needle bearings
    $85.74 shipped
    Hi Performance auto service:
    -needle bearing spacers
    -synchros
    -balls/springs
    -countershaft aka layshaft thrust washers
    $227.23 shipped
    I-Roll Motors:
    -gasket set
    -flange pins for shift fork
    -layshaft inner rod
    -pilot bearing
    -throwout bearing
    $213.86 shipped
    Old School aka Galen:
    -extra m40
    -updated rear main seal flange
    (brake pads, bonus)
    $40 local pickup
    Ebay seller:
    -Asco clutch disk
    $35 shipped
    IPD:
    rear main seal
    $6.40 local pick up
    Parts total:
    $619.64
    I'd probably want $200 labor to do this again now that I'm set up.
    #6
  7. mnd

    mnd Long timer

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    Nice.

    How similar are the M40 and the M46?
    #7
  8. slackmeyer

    slackmeyer Don't mean sheeit. .

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    You've come a long way, zombie stomp. Nice work.
    #8
  9. Zombie_Stomp

    Zombie_Stomp Aspiring human

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    I know nothing about an m46, although at either hiperformanceautoservice.com, formerly known as Old Volvos Only, or Iroll motors, there are diagrams introducing each category of transmission parts, so I'd check those out if you wanted to know.

    Sunday or Monday should see a full reassembly depending upon parts deliveries, so stay tuned. This will be a full-on, under-the-car step-by-step instruction to R&R the tranny.

    I'll let it be known I've now spent $620 on the rebuild, and on clutch and rear main seal parts. More than I spent on the car itself initially. It will be oil leak free and have another 43 years on the transmission though. An engine rebuild could be in the works too, but who cares? This engine will outlive any on the planet as long as I keep it from leaking. Compression's full on high end of specs.

    The way I look at it is, if I can restore this car myself, learning how to do it all along the way (and I can) and I spend under 10 grand all told (and I keep all receipts), I will come out ahead of anyone buying used cars or new cars. That money did take me 4 months to save though.
    #9
  10. Zombie_Stomp

    Zombie_Stomp Aspiring human

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    Now I'll start ckecking off the parts as the orders come in.
    -Flange pins (shift fork)
    -Gasket set
    Awaiting the rest of the parts is:
    [​IMG]
    #10
  11. Zombie_Stomp

    Zombie_Stomp Aspiring human

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    X-input bearing
    X-output bearing
    -mainshaft needle bearings
    -countershaft or Layshaft needle bearings
    -needle bearing spacers
    -synchros
    -balls/springs
    -countershaft aka layshaft thrust washers
    x-gasket set
    x-flange pins for shift fork
    x-layshaft inner rod
    x-pilot bearing
    x-throwout bearing
    -Asco clutch disk
    More stuff came today. I cut the gaskets for both surfaces of the rear main seal flange, still need to pick up a seal.
    [​IMG]
    I also made a mirror baseplate. I manually machined it on a cheap drillpress mill to accept countersunk fasteners for ther base which will now no longer turn axially, but it is still better than the old one by far. I gasketed the baseplate, used silicone, and made a large backing washer from a cheap stamped wrench to support some of the weight of the mirror inside the door. The plan was to cut and shape this baseplate to a more graceful form, but with the home foundry stuff I'll be doing at my new place, the possibilities are endless.
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    A battery strap was also fashioned and fitted. I need better fasteners than the protrude-y screws I have now, but I like the simplicity of it: a boxed in area for a battery and appropriate thickness heavy duty padding. No adjustments.
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    The red spark plug wires. I found an accel wire kit but no crimper. Bright yellow 8mm wires. i gave it a shot with pliers and it worked, but not as well as this charming set of champion 7mm red wires I found. One end was already crimped into the right kind of end and I simply screwed in the other end to my nice Bosch resuable bakelite spark plug terminals and rubber boots slid over those. Sharp!
    [​IMG]
    See Y'all Monday when the rest of this stuff arrives!
    #11
  12. Zombie_Stomp

    Zombie_Stomp Aspiring human

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    I got the shaft friom Iroll. Mike Dudek, owner, ships a fast little package being as close and small a business as he is. I highly recommend him as well as the other two I used, Sedish Treasures out of NY, and Hiperformanceautoservice, formerly Old Volvos Only.
    [​IMG]
    With the works apart, the first step is to reinsert the layshaft rod.
    [​IMG]
    First we make a shaft slightly smaller than the original in diameter.
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    In the haynes manual, it appears to fit just inside ther length of the layshaft itself, so we cut one down to this size.
    [​IMG]
    Next we drop in the first spacer and pack the grease inside the layshaft end. Then the needle bearings are individually inserted in the gap between the shaft walls and our temporary rod. More grease is packed in.
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    The layshaft washers are shellaced with some oldschool gasket shellac and tacked in position in the 'box. The rod can be used for accuracy.
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    The layshaft can be lowered into the gearbox and the spacer rode pushed out by our replacement rod. We won't drive this in just yet, as we might not get the other shaft in with it in place and need to remove it at some point. Just make sure it is facing the same direction as the old one so that the larger part is driven into the correct end of the 'box. The new one seems hardened and of new design, as it has no number and the ends are coned out.
    [​IMG]
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    As it turns out, the layshaft rod has to come out for us to merge the halves of the main shaft. So back out with it. Fun excercise though.
    Let's build the main shafts back up with the new synchros on the gears and a coating of gear oil.
    [​IMG]
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    The synchros engaging dogs must go in the same as they came out, big end facing rear. The springs must be situated as a mirror image of themselves, that is, the l-shaped bend is on the same dog on both sides. We'll make the rear one align with this pattern as well, for shits and giggles.
    [​IMG]
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    The new synchros can be put on their respective gears and stacked on the way they were originally.
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    Now we repeat the bearing trick with the input shaft. The same drift we use for the layshaft can be used as a center spacer.
    [​IMG]
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    I kept it outside to keep the grease cold while I worked.
    [​IMG]
    With this shaft rebuilt, and the bearings & grease routine repeated and the input shaft installed, we are ready to insert the output shaft. Careful, now. I realized the big synchro was on backwards later making the shift lever forks misaligned.
    [​IMG]
    Make sure everything's facing the right direction.
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    [​IMG]
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    Now we can turn it upside down and turn the mainshaft halves while using some sort of tapered drift to realign the layshaft until we can insert the new shaft from the correct end. The guide says to drive the shaft out the rear, so in the rear it goes, slightly stepped end out.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
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    Whew! How many tries did it take you to get that right? I count about 5.
    Now we seal up the ends and focus on the rods in the top. They are placed back in, I have replaced the two feet on the one synchro shift fork.
    [​IMG]
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    Note that all of these photos show the big synchro guy pointed the wrong way. There is no photo of the main shaft with the bigger synchro on the correct way, please note. You will notice the shift rod attachments will not align right and you will have to take it all apart again like I did.
    The balls and springs are reinstalled, and the new gasket and top cover can go on.
    [​IMG]
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    A brief shift test with the lever fitted reveals that this transmission is now restored and ready to be installed. Gear oil goes in the shifter hole until it flows out the fill level hole and it is ready.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    A trip to IPD later for a rear main seal, and I'll be ready for the juicy, detailed photo-filled step-by-step M40 R&R guide you've all been waiting for.
    #12
  13. Zombie_Stomp

    Zombie_Stomp Aspiring human

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    With the car jacked up, I started unbolting the driveshaft bolts and transmission bolts, and the four crossmember bolts.
    [​IMG]
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    I'm not sure what order is best but you have to have the driveshaft out of the way and the crossmember out of the way to get the transmission to slide out, so they all come off like I did it before.
    [​IMG]
    If you can get under there on a creeper and have the car high enough off the ground, you can just start undoing stuff.
    [​IMG]
    Special caution is used on those allen headed bolts on the gearbox. You may need to drill one or more of them out, a method of removal more civil and likely to spare your transmission case from damage unlike my dremel method on the first attempt. You might need a cable drive drill attachment to get drilling action in next to the box, but I'm not sure since I grinded instead. If you're doing the rear main seal, you may want to remove the whole bellhousing with the tranny. I did my gearbox only recently, so I knew they would come off easily this time, and I had selected the least-stripped ones to use.
    [​IMG]
    Thanks for the short term service, cheap spare M40! you're dismissed!
    [​IMG]
    The bellhousing bolts are easily reached and off it comes. Two of them are starter bolts, so I took off my starter for evaluation. You might want to disconnect the positive battery terminal before all this. The main positive juice hookup is on the starter. I didn't encounter any problems, but the gas line is right there, and so it would have been better if I'd done that at the beginning.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    What the hell is this? Is that a clutch? Does the throwout bearing really press against that odd flying saucer bay door looking thing? I still don't understand clutches, andtime for the clutch. But first, get out your blind bearing puller and get that pilot bearing changed. Then put the clutch back on and use the alignment tool.
    [​IMG]
    I cleaned the starter thoroughly and decided to clear coat it's beautiful natural steel & cast iron finish.
    [​IMG]
    Time to put the bellhousing on.
    [​IMG]
    Hoisting the gearbox in after that take s a few tries so get ready for some benchpressing. Here I go...
    This time the box wouldn't slide all the way in like before. I had enough threads to get all 4 bolts started though, so I progressivley snugged them up going around the box and it popped in smootly. There seemed to be tension around the entry ring where the front seal flange and the bellhousing hole contact each other.
    [​IMG]
    A new HD mount makes worlds of difference in firmness and power.
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    Checking over everything.
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    Prior to the swap, I had to scrub the engine with mineral spirits, then simple green, then powerwashed it and scrubbed some more with the SG until it was spotless so I could be leak free. I had also just gotten the alloy valve cover. So while i was out I had picked up some engine enamel, as close to the original cap color I could find. Might as well pretend like i rebuilt the engine since I'm doing the tranny. That bare cast iron, 'I degreased the engine using nuclear waste' look had to go.
    [​IMG]
    Tadaa! Next I'll rebuild a b20 and stick that in. On the list are master cylinder and slave cylinder on the clutch system. I had the fluid all drain out to an unknown location out an unknown hole overnight again. That happened to me after the first temporary gearbox xwap too, so if it only happens once every time I've got the gearbox out, I'm good. i still want to make my clutch Slave Cylindr bulletproof using one of Ron Kwas' kits at SW-EM.com.
    #13
  14. El Hombre

    El Hombre Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,536
    Location:
    Alta Coma, California
    Is there a spec for the gap between the synchro ring and the gear? This is where you put the ring on the cone surface of the gear, and stick a feeler gauge between the ring and the gear. I did some VW bug trannys back in the '70's, seem to recall the gap was .040" new and at .018 it was worn out. Might avoid having to buy them with your next one. Or at least know how far they are worn.
    #14
  15. Zombie_Stomp

    Zombie_Stomp Aspiring human

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,264
    Location:
    Beaverton & Surrounding Areas
    I thought the wear was visible on the teeth. Oops, i may have some good ones. I do have another m40 here that I could rebuild and keep or sell. I'll use that test on it and save a bunch on parts. This one cost me over $600 in parts.

    The latest news on the transmission is that it is leaking a little. I changed the fluid last night and saw a light metallic gleam in the fluid, seems really normal for all those parts that had never met. Normal break in. Everything shifts fine. Had slight trouble getting into 2nd and it is breaking in and getting easier as the detent balls and new synchros and springs start wearing in a little. The front seal leaking is because I changed the front flange at the last minute when it woudn't go in all the way. The second time in, same thing, but I wasn't going to take it back out again and change flanges, I just bolted it in even though I had just resealed the previous one. Or, the thin gasket that was on the flange already is leaking. the rear one looks like the paper gasket I cut failed to seal. next time I'll silicone it on both sides or use another gasket adhesive. the rear seal is also old, as the seal kit came only with one for a later model m40 with a different mainshaft spline pattern. I only had a good shape old one to use, so the flange had to match. I hope IPD has the right one when I go to pick up my clutch slave cylinder.

    The clutch master cylinder drained out on me twice. I'm going to replace both, and remove the gearbox, put tons of silicone on a new front and rear gasket which I'll cut, and reseal the rear shaft flange and use the resealed front flange. That should stop all leaks and fully restore the clutch system and transmission. so that bumps the budget of this affair to the $750 range.

    Then it will be on to other areas... front engine seal, u-joints, suspension, exhaust, floorboards repairs.
    #15
  16. slackmeyer

    slackmeyer Don't mean sheeit. .

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,363
    Location:
    Berzerkeley, CA
    One method I've used with BMW motorcycle transmissions for reinstallation- make a couple headless studs that fit in the engine block, and grind slots in them. Slip the transmission holes over these studs (so that it lines up correctly), and put in bolts in the remaining holes. Then remove your studs with a screwdriver, and put bolts in those holes.
    #16
  17. 3uba296

    3uba296 Thumpcurious

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2010
    Oddometer:
    134
    Location:
    Sweden
    Dude, nice work.

    Here in Sweden you can almost get those trannys for free tough. :wink:
    #17
  18. El Hombre

    El Hombre Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,536
    Location:
    Alta Coma, California
    You did all that without the shop manual? I'm impressed. The manual is a good idea tho, you need it for the specs on end float, syncro wear, shift fork wear, that kind of stuff.

    Try 3 Bond instead of silicone on gaskets, you paint it on, nice thin layer. Doesn't squeeze out like silicone and make a mess by getting into the trans. Looks more professional as well.
    #18
  19. Cowboy

    Cowboy Ceteris non Paribus

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,998
    Location:
    Elizabeth, Colorado
    Three years later . . .

    Thanks for the effort and time producing this tutorial. I suspect I'll be getting good use from it very soon, as my tranny is starting to make noise on acceleration in 2nd and 3rd gears. All other gears are quiet and even second and third go quiet on overrun. Not sure what would cause these symptoms except maybe bad needle bearings in the layshaft. Gonna pull it apart and find out.

    I hope you're still getting good use from your Volvo, Zombie Stomp! Mine's my daily driver, and I love it.

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    #19
  20. Cowboy

    Cowboy Ceteris non Paribus

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,998
    Location:
    Elizabeth, Colorado
    Well, my tranny is now in pieces on the bench, and those needle bearings look perfect, but the shaft they run on, well . . . not so perfect. I think we've identified the weak spot on M40 trannys. The rest of mine looks factory new inside, but the nitride coating is coming of my shaft just like it came off Zombie-Stomp's:

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    #20