Wandering . . . Indiana (Noob)

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Day Trippin'' started by jdfog2, Jun 30, 2012.

  1. 72 Yamaha RD350

    72 Yamaha RD350 Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2017
    Oddometer:
    1,112
    Location:
    Lake Wobegon
    Casinos hold less than zero interest to me. I don't begrudge the native american tribes for having them, but I have a natural dis-inclination toward games of any type. Playing golf is as close as I get to any game.

    "...mile for mile, ... the most diverse terrain"? I don't know what the caveat is for, but I don't think so. It's not like Oklahoma can compete against Colorado, Montana, or Arizona. You don't see millions of people planning their vacations to Oklahoma.

    Sure, I'd like to ride there but Oklahoma is toward the bottom of a long list.

    I've been to the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in OKC. Great place. Possibly the best of its class in the world. Its the site of my first "museum ephiphany" of which I've had several since. I spent fourteen years living in Arizona... hiking, camping, and exploring it and the surrounding states. Yet it was only after spending 2-3 hours at the museum in OKC that I was hit with the epiphany that The American West as we preach it is a myth. John Wayne, Manifest Destiny, cowboys & indians, self-reliance & individualism - it's all hogwash. But that's a sermon for another Sunday.

    If you haven't been to the NC&WHM in OKC - get yourself down there. Enjoy the art and artifacts of one of the few things that make America unique in the world. And if you can't get down there, spend a half day at the Eiteljorg Museum in Indianapolis. It's a smaller version of NC&WHM with credible content in its own right. In the first room on the right is a multi-panel landscape mural of the Grand Canyon. If you have never had a "museum epiphany", sit down on the bench in front of that mural of the Grand Canyon and stare at it until you see its 3D content. You may not see it at first, but once you do its impossible to see it as a 2D painting. I've been to the Grand Canyon multiple times but in some ways that mural is better than the real thing.
    #81
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  2. jdfog2

    jdfog2 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2012
    Oddometer:
    383
    Location:
    West Central Indiana
    Just a couple of music links for those of you that enjoy that sorta thing
    #82
  3. jdfog2

    jdfog2 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2012
    Oddometer:
    383
    Location:
    West Central Indiana
    #83
  4. jdfog2

    jdfog2 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2012
    Oddometer:
    383
    Location:
    West Central Indiana
    #84
  5. jdfog2

    jdfog2 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2012
    Oddometer:
    383
    Location:
    West Central Indiana
    #85
  6. jdfog2

    jdfog2 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2012
    Oddometer:
    383
    Location:
    West Central Indiana
    To my riding buddies - and a few other buddies that just follow my thread (or more than likely converse with over in the "Still Wandering in Indiana" thread hosted by my friend Joel) - I've been away a while.

    I've tried to drop in and check things out from time to time but I have been very busy since around November 2nd.

    On that day, my father, "the original jdfog" started the last battle of his 7 year war with Cancer.

    He passed from this world surrounded by loving family Tuesday evening 11 Feb 2020 at 1945 hrs.

    We buried him yesterday (Saturday, 15 Feb 2020) with full military (Navy) honors.

    Dad was a true bad ass, my Original Action Hero, best friend, and my (2nd) toughest critic. (Me being my toughest).
    He was also one of the kindest, best hearted people you'd ever meet unless you were messing with his family (especially my sisters).

    My dad's dad passed away when my dad was 3 years old. A few years later his oldest brother joined the Army and went away to Korea.
    And then the remaining man in his life (his grandpa) passed away when Dad was just shy of his 13th birthday. My dad was devastated but he persevered. He quit school and worked hard jobs to support himself and my Grandma. He worked in a poultry plant cleaning chickens from early in the morning until late afternoon. I NEVER saw him eat any kind of chicken my entire life. When he was 15 he was able to land a job assembling wheel chairs (mostly threading spokes, truing wheels) on 2nd shift. He also did a lot of part time work as he could find it. He joined the Navy shortly after turning 17.

    Dad went on to eventually graduate from High School (GED in the Navy) and did very well for himself and provided well for us when we were growing up. He retired from a 30 year career with IBM. He then went full time into the real estate and storage facility business for several years.

    He is to "blame" for my love of motorcycles. He bought my first one, a Honda Mini Trail - brand new ! I was 10 and that was a very big deal. Dad bought a new Honda 500 Four around the same time. He'd already had several used motorcycles so I was already addicted to riding on the back. Dad would chase or lead me around our property on his 500 Four - more than once denting a pipe or messing something up on his bike. It wasn't really an ADV bike after all. But he supposedly told a friend something along the lines of , "I'm not raising a Honda, I'm raising kids." A few years later I turned 18 and purchased a KZ650 (with a Vetter Fairing.) I rode it as my primary transportation for a couple of years until going into the Air Force. My Dad enjoyed riding it as well. He didn't like the fairing - but he loved the power compared to the 500 Four.

    Seven plus years ago Dad was diagnosed with lung cancer at 75 years of age. It was in a bad location to operate on, but a very skilled surgeon and team were able to remove it, along with the upper lobe of his right lung.

    Dad knew cancer would eventually claim his body but he wanted to make sure it wasn't going to take his spirit.
    He fought like a Spartan for over 7 years.

    For example, a few months after that first surgery my dad was back in the gym working out on a regular basis.
    Dad worked out on his 80th birthday (with a portable oxygen generator and an oxgen tube) and during that workout completed 4 sets / 8 reps per set of bicep curls using 80lb. dumbbells. (He'd worked out with as much as 90 lb dumbells since his surgery but by the time he was 80 it wasn't a "workout" weight anymore.) He had planned and worked hard to be able to do that just so he could tell cancer to get screwed. I'm 58 years old and I am pretty sure I can't pick up 80lbs with one arm, let alone curl it 8 reps.

    He left behind his wife, 4 beautiful daughters, 1 son (me), 11 grandkids, and a few great grandkids.

    He will be missed.

    Fair winds and Following Seas Joe Fogle. RIP.
    #86
  7. radianrider

    radianrider Adventurer wanna'be

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,345
    Location:
    Avon, IN If we never go, we will never know
    My friend,

    I am so sorry for your loss, but grateful that your father left you with a legacy of loving his children. I remember saying much the same when you lost your mother and it is apparent that they both understood life's priorities.

    May we all be remembered by our children with the same love and respect you've shown your father.

    Joel
    #87
  8. 72 Yamaha RD350

    72 Yamaha RD350 Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2017
    Oddometer:
    1,112
    Location:
    Lake Wobegon
    JD: My sincere condolences over the loss of your father. Most young men never recover from the challenges he faced but he was clearly a conqueror of his circumstances from the beginning of his life until the very end. May he rest in peace.
    #88