Want to try trials-is this bike worth trying for a newbie?

Discussion in 'Trials' started by KIM750, Oct 30, 2018.

  1. KIM750

    KIM750 Adventurer

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    I did MX 40 years ago, took 40 years off from riding dirt, and recently got back into it riding. I started earlier this year on a 1977 Husky 360a KTM 300XC. I've always been interested in trials, and would like to give it a try. This bike is for sale by me and relatively inexpensive. Worth getting, or so old it won't be fun? Parts availability? Any advice appreciated. https://frederick.craigslist.org/mcy/d/1974-yamaha-ty175/6736011876.html
    #1
  2. lineaway

    lineaway Long timer

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    Some swear the ty175 was tbe best vintage bike ever. I think it was a boring bike to own. A 2000 dollar bike around a 2005 model would be more interesting.
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  3. jonnyc21

    jonnyc21 Trials Ninja

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    If you want a vintage Yamaha I like the TY175 better than the TY250, but I agree that a mid to later 2000’s modern bike would be more fun.
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  4. Norman Foley

    Norman Foley Devotee of the Husqvarna

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  5. Boom Boom

    Boom Boom Been here awhile

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    That Rev3 I purchased new and know the current owner....not many hours on it and the side case replace has been done and engine ice in it so should be good. The TY is in the center of MAVT riders and will not last long at all. I have a garage of vintage bikes or would snap that TY in a minute. Agree with all the comments. Sounds like you want to have a go at trials and the newer bike will be far more fun.
    #5
  6. Brewtus

    Brewtus Buffoonery, Inc.

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    +1. :nod
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  7. Boom Boom

    Boom Boom Been here awhile

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  8. KIM750

    KIM750 Adventurer

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    Thanks. I appreciate the advice. I may look into the beta suggested. How's parts availability for that Beta?
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  9. Norman Foley

    Norman Foley Devotee of the Husqvarna

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    Friend rides one and Mike Komer at the Tryals Shop has kept it going for him. The guy rides two days a week and in two years has advanced to Intermediate. I think it could work for you.
    #9
  10. Hoss Cartright

    Hoss Cartright Been here awhile

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    I agree, that TY is a smokin' deal!
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  11. Boom Boom

    Boom Boom Been here awhile

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    Think the Beta just sold.....
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  12. Twin-shocker

    Twin-shocker Long timer

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    If you are a newcomer to trials a TY175 would be pretty much perfect for you and would help you to learn the basic techniques quite quickly. Parts availability is probably better than that for some modern machines and cost is a lot lower. In modified form a TY175 is competitive against modern machines in easier events and while it obviously heavier than a modern bike is far more reliable and for a beginner far easier to ride.

    If you choose to ride modern I would say you are probably going to take a lot longer to learn the basics and will spend a fair amount of time struggling to simply hang on to the bike in the sections. Ride the 175 for a year and you will be at a much more advanced level than riding modern for year and you can then choose if you want to continue with 175 or sell it and go modern.
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  13. alpineboard

    alpineboard Been here awhile

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    As a newbie to trials in 2016 , but lots of prior riding mx/endure in the past, kind of like your situation. After 3 full seasons on a 2016 beta evo, as my first trials bike. And just recently ( 3 days ago ) getting a 1988 Beta TR34 260cc, with a few rides already.

    Can say that an older vintage bike steer the same as a recent bike, but are much heavier, ex: 40 pounds, and much more abrupt/rougher suspension. These older bikes require more energy out of you to ride. In an older bike, you will learn how to steer and balance thru the tight turny stuff, but not be able to do the upper level rocks that a more recent bike can do.

    Once you get bit by the trials bug, there is no tuning back, so imo, you need to choose where you want to be in a year or 2, happy with the more recent bike that you initially bought, or be looking for a more recent bike in a year or 2. And with a newer more recent bike, the learn curve will be faster, easier, and more enjoyable.

    All prior comments are spot on correct. Just thought I'd chime in here, as just got this 1988 and can do a quick comparison.
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  14. PMK

    PMK Been here awhile

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    That TY175 appears to have the Sammy Miller kit that relocated the footpegs. Being new to trials myself, still a hack at skills while learning, and having the mid 2000s bike and a vintage bike also, I agree that for most stuff at lower class levels either work fine. Disc brakes are nice when needed, but drums work ok for the intermediate lines I ride. Yes, the vintage bike is heavier, as mentioned, about 40 pounds.

    New bikes are nice, parts are available, and they can be mellowed out making them easier to ride. The mid 2000 bikes seem fine, but parts and plastic can sometimes be a challenge. Vintage bikes are fun, especially if there are a few riding the same class at an event, parts could be a problem, but usually are not for common models.

    That TY is neat, but I tend to agree that a decent semi modern bike, not trashed and with reasonable parts availability could be easier to start on, however, no shame in enjoy a vintage bike, but it may take a bit of time, effort and money to get it setup, sorted out and reliable.

    Not sure, but was under the i pression that TY has points ignition. I say this based on seeing a gaggle of people working on the sole TY175 ignition at one of our events.
    #14