Watching your significant other crash

Discussion in 'Face Plant' started by Ride2ADV, Sep 21, 2009.

  1. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,446
    Location:
    If we haven't been there, it's on the list.
    We were out dual sport riding this weekend weekend and my wife had a fairly low speed getoff (20 MPH or so) on some sand transitioning from a dirt road to pavement while riding her DR650. She had on full ATGATT and ended up sliding down the road a bit, banging her head and jamming her thumb, but nothing is broken or seriously tweeked.

    We've been riding for many years and some of the riding during the day was spirited on little traveled dirt roads and Class IV woods roads. But seeing your significant other on the roadway is a strange experience. Falling in the dirt is one thing, pavement is another. We're not going to give up riding or anything, but jeez, still an experience.

    I have to tell ya, if you haven't experienced it, you can't imagine it the moment you see it. But it's something we both love and she's a trooper so we'll keep on keeping on. :D

    There's too many places to see and places to go.

    That is all.
    #1
  2. Glockowner

    Glockowner Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2008
    Oddometer:
    322
    Location:
    Southern Indiana
    I would imagine it is quite nerve racking, glad everyone is ok!
    #2
  3. CopaMundial

    CopaMundial Wow, that broke easy

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,851
    Location:
    US, SE PA & Central ME
    Sort of crazy how you forget about the bike under you.
    You just want to get to them as soon as possible... easy to picture just hopping off and dropping your bike that way.
    #3
  4. TandemGeek

    TandemGeek Hors Category

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    82
    Location:
    Near Atlanta, GA
    Hasn't happend on the big bikes, but it has while we were on our single road bicycles.... She came around a corner a bit too fast and hit a depression that sent her off into somone's front yard and while she 'saved it' there, her corrected course took her straight into a mail box at the end of the driveway. She hit in a way that from my perspective looked as though she hit the mail box with her head and face before hitting the pavement flat balled up around her bike.

    I had been stopped 100' further down the road with a friend waiting for she and another gal and two friends on a tandem to catch up and got to watch the entire thing unfold.

    After running to her and thankfully finding that she'd hit the mail box with her right handlebar / shifter / hand instead of her head, I collected my wits, tended to her hand and finished checker her out for any further damage I looked back up the road only to see that I'd thrown my own bike about 10' as I ran back to where she was.

    Yeah, it gets your attention and stays with you for a long time.
    #4
  5. LuciferMutt

    LuciferMutt Rides slow bike slow

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2008
    Oddometer:
    15,428
    Location:
    New(er) Mexico
    Watched my wife biff on gravel about 6 months after she started riding. I watched the whole thing happen in my rearview mirror. It really does suck. I don't think I've ever pulled over, parked the bike and gotten to her so fast in my life. Yet by the time I got there, she had already picked up her bike herself! :lol3

    She had a nasty bruise on her knee and a cut on her shin (this was before we had purchased riding pants, go figure. :bluduh ) Needless to say we got them right after that incident.

    In many ways I'm glad my wife has decided to stop riding. She never really was confident again after that crash.
    #5
  6. DeerSlalom

    DeerSlalom Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2009
    Oddometer:
    441
    Location:
    Perrineville, NJ
    Watched my wife lose it on her scooter when she took a corner too hot, stood it up went off the road and then lowsided at about 40. I was behind on my KLR. I jumped off my bike at about 10mph and ran right over to her. I swear it was like I got to her before she stopped sliding.

    She had argued with me that day about wearing ATG because it was pretty hot but she had finally given in to my demands. She was wearing mesh jacket/pants and wound up with minor rash and a bruised knee. Her full face hjc was toast but did it's job and she walked away from it.

    Both rims on the scooter were in pieces(impacted with the curb) but I could really care less about it. I felt sick and nauseous and couldn't get the image of her sliding the road out of my mind. I still cringe when I think about it and how bad it could have been.

    Oh yeah, my klr broke the mirror and both turn signals on the left side when it came to a sudden stop by impacting a tree about 30yrds ahead of where my wife's scooter was.
    #6
  7. g8tor-girl

    g8tor-girl n00b

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3
    Three years ago for me. We had put over three hundred miles of great mountain roads including the Dragon and the Cherohala. We were looking for our motel and our lead bike almost missed the sharp right into the motel lot. Rick was immediately behind and followed but his front tire hit a patch of gravel. It was dark and I’m sure he never saw it. His front end washed out and down he went right in front of me. I somehow managed to abort the turn and pull to the side of the road just in front of him. I even managed to get side stand down and turn on my flashers but have no memory of doing either. What I do remember is all the sparks coming out from under his Sportster as it slid along the road.
    His leathers did a good job but one glove came off and he had some road rash on his right hand. We righted the bike and got everyone up to the lighted parking lot. As we were accessing the damage my friend Kym hugged me and said “You are shaking like a leaf”. It was true. That sight of Rick, his bike and all the sparks will never leave my head.
    #7
  8. bomber60015

    bomber60015 tikkun olam Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2008
    Oddometer:
    66,545
    Location:
    Chicago-ish
    I've heard my best riding buddy, wing man (person) and wife drop -- twisty road out near the Dragon (watch out for Happy Valley and Butterfly Gap, btw) . . . . . she hit a very damp patch of pavement, she lowsided while the bike highsided -- I know that the sound indicated, got turned around and went to fetch her buck UP the 50 foot embankment she slid down --

    right into poison ivy patch!

    Bad gris gris to have a loved one go down . . . . .

    In this case, the bestest fun was listening to our daughter over the phone when we called back home that night. . . .

    wife: "Hello, kid -- everything's OK, but I wanted to ca. . . . . . "

    disembodied voice coming outa the phone: "WTF? &*#()$%8 *)($ *&)#$*, put Dad on the phone!"

    me: "hey kiddo, how're . . . "

    kid: "Now wait. I'm the kid. I'm supposed to call YOU and say, 'don't worry, everything's OK,' not the oterh way round, got it?"

    ;-}
    #8
    SocalRob likes this.
  9. Megamoto

    Megamoto Yes, I do look like this. Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    Oddometer:
    3,707
    Location:
    You know...I think I've been here before.
    Whilst we were practicing for a 24hr endurance race Mrs MM entered a downhill right-hand hairpin. The front wheel tucked and she was down. One broken rib, a mass of bruising and a totaled set of leathers.

    She can laugh about it now.....
    #9
  10. AKDuc

    AKDuc Alaska Born Ducatisti

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2006
    Oddometer:
    6,872
    Location:
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Hello from way up north! :wave

    Very glad to hear Kim's ok. :thumb

    To continuing good times, Mark H.
    #10
  11. Tweak

    Tweak n00b

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2
    Here's my experience, and I feel like it is "A tale told by an idiot".

    The week before we had taken a long trip, me on my bike and she on hers, to a motorcycle drag race, with three other riders who competed in the event. She only had a couple thousand miles experience so the rest of us rode reasonably, no more than ten over for the most part.

    On this Sunday a week later, she was going on about how slow we rode to the races, and how we should go on a brisk ride somewhere. Well, I knew just the road, plenty of curves and not much traffic. I led and tried to ride a little faster, just fast enough to help her find her limits but much less than the maximum possible speed for that road. Things were going ok then it happened. The curve was marked 20 and I took it at 40 which is still way slower than it can be taken. She's about a quarter mile behind and when I look back she's down in the curve, separated from her bike and sliding. My heart jumped into my throat! I did a quick u turn and by the time I get there she is up and walking around and asking how her bike is. I told her we would look at her bike later, I needed to look at her first. The only obvious hurt was a rash on her arm where her jacket sleeve rode up. Her bike wasn't too badly off either but the clutch lever is broken so I roll it into the field off the road and lock it.

    Next question, do we call for paramedics? I consider the possibility she's hurt more than she knows but she is lucid and nothing is obviously broken and the largest hospital in the area is only 15 miles away. We decide not to stop at the store that's one mile away to call for help. She gets on the back of my bike and we head for the hospital. About half way there she starts losing consciousness, but now we're not near anything. I am yelling at her to stay awake and holding her on the bike with one arm. We finally get to the hospital and she gets rushed into ER. An MRI shows that she is bleeding internally from a contused kidney. She spent a week in intensive care, but recovered completely, and didn't lose the kidney.

    I spent the night at the hospital. She kept asking about her bike and I said don't worry about it, I had rolled it to a spot where it wasn't obvious, and locked it. The next day I go to get it and it's gone, stolen. Ending up offering a reward, no questions asked, and got it back. But the thieves had totally disassembled it and stashed it in the woods, covered by nothing but tree leaves. There was no part of the machine that didn't have something wrong with it due to the careless disassembly and corrosion from the way it was stashed. It had to be completely rebuilt. She still owns the bike, a 1989 Sportster, which was my anniversary present to her in '89.

    I was an idiot. I didn't insist she get motorcycle training. I purposely rode a little faster than I knew we should. And I trusted my ability and her ability to ascertain her injuries. She never blamed me but I will always feel responsible even though everything finally, in the end, and after much grief, worked out.
    #11
    OneAUout likes this.
  12. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,446
    Location:
    If we haven't been there, it's on the list.
    Hi Mark,

    Another AK riding season rapidly coming to an end? :cry Thanks for the well wishes, Kim is fine. We are hoping to get back your way in a couple of years; we had such a wonderful time there.

    Keep the place as great as ever will ya?

    Best,

    Mike and Kim
    #12
  13. Yankee Dog

    Yankee Dog Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,179
    Location:
    Decatur, AL
    I watched the missus go down a couple of years ago. She had not been riding long. We got caught in bad weather during an overnighter a couple of hundred miles from home.

    The temps were in the upper 30s and there was just a bit of snow coming down. We were riding through a small town. The light turned yellow and she applied just a tad too much front brake. I remember seeing the front wheel turn to the left and thinking that it was a bad sign.

    She went down and started sliding all the while doing slow pin wheels on the pavement. We had intercomms and I remember thinking she was OK because I could hear her cuss :huh as she went sliding down the road. I got my bike stopped and also remember repeating over to myself; kickstand, kickstand to force myself to take the time to put mine down. We didnt need two bikes laying on their side blocking traffic.

    She was very shaken up, but between full protective gear and heavy cold weather clothing was otherwise unhurt. Still she was not up to riding the rest of the way home. We found a local bike shop to store hers in and she road pillion on the back of mine the rest of the way home.

    yankee Dog
    #13
  14. Titania

    Titania Scourge of the East

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2004
    Oddometer:
    3,662
    Location:
    Flugistan
    I've been on both sides of this, and WATCHING it happen to someone else is infinitely harder to take.
    I was on a cross-country tour, on the way home, and my touring partner was taken down by
    a small herd of deer in western Ontario. His bike was totalled, and he had broken his collarbone.
    I stayed two days there while he cleared through the E/R and had some followup testing, then
    I had to pack and continue home alone.
    The fooking thing played like a filmstrip over and over and over in my head right down to the sound
    of impact and the silence as the motor cut out.
    I cried the whole way home.
    #14
  15. yellowironguy

    yellowironguy Safety glasses required

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2008
    Oddometer:
    13
    Location:
    Centennial, Colorado
    Never had my wife go down on a motorcycle, but was right on her tail when she went down on her road bicycle. I was drafting her down a hill, we were hauling (around 30mph) and she caught a groove and got spit off faster than I could imagine. We were in bicycle gear - helmets but not much more for protection. I watched her head bounce off the concrete. I had a flash of complete terror that I had lost her right there. I didn't even know it, but from the skidmarks, I had both wheels on my bike locked up trying to stay off of her. She was bruised and battered, had a pretty good concussion, but came out just fine in the end. :clap

    Don't care to do that again.
    #15
  16. C Squared

    C Squared Now with TURBO! Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2008
    Oddometer:
    10,423
    Location:
    FDL WI.
    The experience is not fun, but can happen to any of us.

    About 13 years ago...
    My wife took the MSF course and started riding with me. Got her a CSR 305.
    She had been riding on the back of my bike for 2 years.
    I am VERY ATGATT.:D
    So, maybe 3 weeks after the course and getting her license she crashed.
    We had been out riding and stopping for ice cream. We were maybe 3 miles from our house on a county road and I was a couple hundred yards in front of her. 50-55MPH. Straight road with no bad conditions and no "sun in the eyes" although it was later evening (but before dusk). Old guy in a truck is going the other way and signaling a turn into his driveway. He stops and waits for me to pass and then turns.....:eek1 I did not see this. I saw my wife in my mirrors and then over a little rise and she is not there any longer...
    One more rise and still not there! I have a bad feeling! I hit one more rise to be sure I can check for traffic and U-turn to go back. Pretty sure I hit 80 and really bad feeling.
    I see her in the road, her bike in the ditch and the farmer standing next to his truck looking at her.

    He turned right in front of her and she braked and hit him broadside. She might have scrubbed speed down to 40? She had no where to go. Trees and poles and fence everywhere.

    So, I park my bike in the road as a barricade and tell the farmer to dial 911.
    No cell phones. I HOPE he has done this and go to my wife and wait.
    There is a 14" pool of blood about 5 feet from her and she is bleeding from a cut on her eyebrow from her glasses. (inside her helmet) I kinda hold her as she is laying in the road and wait as I talk to her. Seemed like forever, but the first responders were ether in maybe 8 minutes? This is a semi rural place. They cut her jacket off and she has two bones sticking out of her elbow. She was leather head to foot and boots, gloves, etc. Probably saved her life! The ambulance was over 100 MPH on the way to town. I could see the Speedo from the jump seat.
    She was stabilized in our town and then flown to Milw. for further work.
    Now I am on the phone looking for a car cuz I left my bike at the scene.

    Results: Broken pelvis in 3 places (in 1/2 down the middle plus a wing)
    Compound fracture at the R elbow
    severed ulnar nerve
    lacerated liver
    collapsed lung
    4 broken ribs
    L wrist kinda dust like in places

    6 days in trauma surgical ICU and 5 on the floor
    Then 2 months in a home (old age?) for recovery and therapy
    Then another month plus in a wheel chair.

    This was not fun.

    But, she is up and mostly normal. She was back on the bike the next spring and running. Did a 1/2 marathon even!
    She has some scars and some permanent metal, but all is good.

    Friends helped a lot and it is now a memory.

    Gotta say it is a test to plan for a life with a disabled spouse etc.

    Did not happen but could have. The Docs give the % and you hope.
    #16
    Carlo Muro likes this.
  17. kojack

    kojack AMF!

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,541
    Location:
    god's country, AKA. Newfoundland!
    Had 2 friends On www.ridetherock.com on a trip around newfoundland, one of them was struck by a car and killed, the other had to continue alone. that must have been so trying on him. We all have a memorial on the site for ITSTEVE, he was a well like member, husband, dad, and friend. He will be truely missed. Even tho I never got to meet him in person we shared many phone calls about the KLR, and 100's of posts and pm's back and forth. His personality came through, and while here most of the RTR members met him on his travels.

    stay safe everyone!...
    #17
  18. WoodsChick

    WoodsChick Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,790
    Location:
    Oakland, CA
    My goodness, there are some heartbreaking stories here. I'm sorry for what some of you have had to endure.

    My husband was a roadracer when I met him and I've watched him get caught up in all sorts of moto-mayhem. The time before the start of the race was always the worst for me. He'd get all intense and focused, and I'd get all nervous and think the worst, but once the green flag dropped it was all business and all we'd want was a good finish. I've watched him take out rows of hay bales, seen him cartwheel down the front straight at +100mph, just lots of things a wife shouldn't have to watch. There was always that moment of fear that this would be it, but seconds later he would pop up and start running after the bike and then the focus would turn towards getting the bike fixed up and back out there. I'm absolutely sure it would be a much different story if this stuff had been happening on public streets, but it just seemed like business as usual on a track.

    The worst biff I ever witnessed was at a MX race years later after I'd taught him to ride in the dirt. I was spectating as I'd broken my wrist a few weeks earlier while racing MX myself. He was 2nd into the 1st turn, someone hit him from behind and ejected him from the bike and he just ragdolled around from bike to bike for what seemed like forever before hitting the ground and getting run over by the rest of the 40-bike field.
    It was clear he was unconscious long before the very last guy ran over his face, taking a knobby-shaped piece of skin out of his chin through the eyeport of his full-face helmet. I thought he was dead, or at the very least had a broken neck judging by the way his head lolled around as the guy ran over him. I ran as fast as I could, careful not to trip and fall as I had an external fixator sticking out of my arm, and by the time I reached him he had come to and was sitting up with the help of the turn worker. He was bleeding from the nose and mouth and was wondering what had just happened. Once I determined he was coherent and speaking normally, I picked up his bike and he insisted on riding back to the pits. We loaded up immediately before the real pain set in and we left. He ended up being extremely sore with a swollen nose, cuts in his mouth and some missing skin, but no real damage. It was his lucky day! He did the next race at a different track but crashed twice on the same jump in the first moto. It was very painful for me to watch. After the 2nd crash he just sat on the inside of the track til the race was over. I thought he was hurt because he would never voluntarily sit out a race of any kind. He rolled the bike back to the pits with a smile on his face and said, "Hey, let's go home and have a good dinner!" That was the last MX race he ever did :thumb I was very glad. I never did another one, either, although we've done a few GP's and such. We moved on to enduros where the chances are much better for controlling your own destiny.

    He has seen me crash numerous times on the track, trails, dirt roads and such, and it usually elicits a sigh, and then he just goes about preparing to take me to the hospital or whatever. He doesn't get too emotional about it (he's had a ton of practice over the last 20 years :shog ) but I'm sure in his heart of hearts he worries about me. He's had to sit in the waiting room while I was in surgery on several occasions and I'm sure that had to be tough.

    I've only crashed once on the street since we've been together (that sound you hear is me knocking on wood!) and if I hadn't been covered in mud (it was right after a storm and there was mud, branches, debris all over the road) with wildly bent handlebars when I caught up to him he never would have even known I crashed :lol3 We straightened the bars on my plated WR250F and continued on our ride. We stopped on the way back so I could show him the gouge from my footpegs and I wanted to see how far I slid. We measured it out at 70'. I was doing about 45mph and I was ATGATT, so the only damage was to my gear. I ground off one of the buckles on my Alpinestar Tech 8 boots, ground off one of the zipper pulls on my jacket, and ground off the end of the chapstick that was in my front pocket. Funny thing, it put a hole in the fabric of the pants themselves, but there was no hole in the pocket that the chapstick was in. Weird...

    Anyway, I have no desire to see my honey fall down on the street, and with any luck he'll never have to see me fall down on the street either.
    I am 100% sure, though, that we will continue to see each other endure trail humiliation until the end of our days :D


    WoodsChick
    #18
    OneAUout likes this.
  19. debueller

    debueller Has a thing 4Fungirl

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2006
    Oddometer:
    838
    Location:
    Ravensdale, WA
    When your S/O crashes, make sure you grab the camera first:

    y1phabx5p7h53sxvRboykt9d-c9PIZ-mALL1pEFN99N9ENIVJ5O1Oi4zSBpMXpVMuGaSN9mj5LsBh4.jpg

    Only if you are sure she/he is OK.........(she was)
    #19
  20. WoodsChick

    WoodsChick Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,790
    Location:
    Oakland, CA
    :lol3 That's the rule in our house! Consequently, I have a ton of photos of me on the ground. Here's a few...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    CrashingChick
    #20
    jusbeach likes this.