Ways to get on /off a fully loaded GS

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by rocketman1, Oct 23, 2010.

  1. rocketman1

    rocketman1 rocketman1

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    Just thinking of all the adventure riders out there that struggle to get on and off their GS's when fully loaded with gear and petrol, and to get the bike vertical for take off. Especially when your all dressed up in road gear. Hey it not a GS problem as I have ridden a few different large off roaders and when rested on the side of the road and the bike has tilted on the side stand that little bit further than expected, they can be difficult to get vertical again as well as trying to get your leg over the rear luggage....depends on how high the luggage is off course.
    I have found an easy way is to get off, is by making sure the bike is in gear, (so it doesn't move) the side stand down, the stand up on the foot pegs, and jump off the high side, it is easy to get back on the same way. This seems OK as long as the bike is not leaning over too far.
    Anyone else have any tricks for getting on and off a large loaded bike.
    I have seen some bikes with extensions on the end of the side stand. Is this a good idea?
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  2. SR1

    SR1 Going to America!!!!

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    I don't think an extension is necessary, but...

    If I am fully loaded two up and in the situation you described, I'm not above asking my pillion for a GENTLE push on the top box to help get the bike upright.

    When I'm alone I don't have enough crap to have that kinda trouble.
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  3. 802mike

    802mike Been here awhile Supporter

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    To get on and get it upright, I do it all in one motion................
    I swing my leg through and push on the seat as I'm reaching for the ground.
    Turning the front wheel to the right helps too.
    #3
  4. pavement pounder

    pavement pounder The road to Paradise is "UN-Paved"

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    The reason I don't ask my pillion rider to help me with a push is that she is already on the bike. I always have her get on with me on the bike as she has almost pulled it off the stand once before. Also, I always have the stand down as she has nearly pulled me off the bike once too!

    The trick is to park in the right spot but that asside, it is to turn the bars full left! Yep, that's it! Turn bars full left, you now have something solid to pull against. Lean back a little and pull on the left grip. It's instant. 800lbs of gear, bike and pillion up and away! I had to learn some way of doing this because I am not "Mr Muscles" at 5'10" 160lbs. You'll look like you're riding a bull at a rodeo reaching back to right the bike but it's easy.

    I once saw a Goldwinger with a switch on his bars that shut off his side stand safety switch so he could take off with the stand down. He said it worked for him.
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  5. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    You could always just do the McGregor goose-step...

    (Right foot up, and hop forward on your left until your right leg is over the seat)

    J x
    #5
  6. paulhdick

    paulhdick Wannabe Adventurer Supporter

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    When fully loaded I always put the sidestand down before getting off the bike, and also for getting on the bike. I typically turn the handlebars straight and while holding the bars normally I lean as far forward over the front of the bike as possible and just swing my leg over the seat/gear. I am on the tail end of my fifties and still seem to have enough flexibility in the old body to do this :evil
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  7. Adventure Trio

    Adventure Trio Wandering

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    +1

    I use this one often.....
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  8. Norsman

    Norsman ...a GSophile

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    I had my bike fall over on me once when dismounting in front of the dinner in Panamint Springs (that was embarrassing). Ever since then I use the kickstand as a safety.
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  9. RottVet

    RottVet Been here awhile

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    I also do the "goose step mount", but forward kick my right foot over the seat, then turn 9o degrees to face forward. Also put a Kildala fat foot on my side stand peg-it sure helped alot to keep the bike more upright and easier to bring to upright status. The GS's are pigs with aluminum panniers fully loaded, but it is sure great to be able to carry so much!
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  10. Reverse

    Reverse Armchair Tough

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    This ^

    Grab the handlebars, move like you're going to kiss the speedometer and swing your leg over the luggage. Done.
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  11. Sam Buca

    Sam Buca a.k.a. Daniel

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    I once saw a guy standing next to the bike on the left side, lift the side stand, start the bike, put it in gear, put his left foot on the left peg and start riding off while lifting his right leg over the seat.:eek1

    I am too scared to try that myself, but it could work for you.

    I just leave the bike on the side stand in gear, do the goose step thing and in one single motion using the not unsubstantial momentum from my big gut, bring the bike upright. Take care not to go over to the other side. I then retract the side stand, start the bike and ride off normally.

    .
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  12. PacWestGS

    PacWestGS Life Is The Adventure!

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    That's how I do it. :thumb (I call it the "Cowboy Mount" in my training classes for off-raod skills on the big bikes.)

    Practice on a bicycle, then move up to an unladen bike. Pretty soon you will be mounting and dismounting while the bike is still moving.

    The other way that works for me is to put the bike on the center-stand at gas stations then climb on and ride off the stand. May take a tank-hump but that's only funny looking to others.

    Then there is mounting from the right side while the bike is on the side-stand. Put your right foot on the foot peg and in one motion push up off the peg, swing your leg over everything and by the time it's coming down the bike is almost upright, sit, lift side-stand and start engine.
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  13. LaurelPerryOnLand

    LaurelPerryOnLand Long timer

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    Since THIS loading scenario eliminates the 'throwing your leg over the panniers'...I found that simply lifting my RIGHT leg through the seat works best.

    Also...go ahead and use the extra height provided by service station islands to provide 6-8" of extra 'umphh' to get the right leg through. But...don't park so close that you can't get between the bike and the gas pump!

    DON'T: As a fellow club member suggested...MOUNT THE BIKE FROM THE RIGHT SIDE...after refueling once when I parked too close to the island to get the extra 6-8" of help...I actually tried this. Leaning on the right peg with your right foot while you try to get your left leg through the seat (while of course...making sure the center of gravity is OVER THE centerline of the bike).
    Well, it wasn't pretty and lifting the bike back up (fully loaded) was almost impossible. Took 2 people.

    <a href="http://s635.photobucket.com/albums/uu73/RMWBMW/Canada%20May%2015%202010%20Thru%20June%203%202010/?action=view&current=DSC00283.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/advrider-photobucket-images/images/R/RMWBMW_Canada%2520May%252015%25202010%2520Thru%2520June%25203%25202010_DSC00283.jpg" border="0" alt="Me at Watson Lake"></a>
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  14. SiouxsieCat

    SiouxsieCat Been here awhile

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    My big fear with this, especially with a fully loaded GS, is my right leg getting caught on the luggage and not being able to recover.
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  15. PacWestGS

    PacWestGS Life Is The Adventure!

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    Only two... OMG :eek1 (Is there a sink in there somewhere?)

    Seriously, that's a lot of stuff you have there. :nod

    The worst I've ever done was this:
    [​IMG]

    or this:
    [​IMG]
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  16. Menoche

    Menoche Been here awhile

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    Hmmm, why not just put your left foot on the left peg while on the side stand? It'll. Give you the extra height to swing your right leg over and compress the suspension enough to put the bike straight while sitting down on the seat....
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  17. PacWestGS

    PacWestGS Life Is The Adventure!

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    Once you get it down (or is that up and over), I've never had a problem getting my leg over.

    Is this the best (safest) way, probably not, but it does work. With practice it becomes natural and efficient, with or without luggage and is very helpful when off-road and off chamber or sand with a running start (left or right side).
    #17
  18. PacWestGS

    PacWestGS Life Is The Adventure!

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    While I've done that, I'm not comfortable putting that much more weight on the side-stand. It's only made to hold up the bike and some luggage, not an extra three or four hundred pounds.
    #18
  19. LaurelPerryOnLand

    LaurelPerryOnLand Long timer

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    Funny you should ask about 'the sink'...I was going to comment that there was a sink in the picture...nah...nah...somebody will respond with a 'sink' comment. Thanks, I was right. Only took 1 post.

    BTW...all of the 'stuff' behind the rider seat was only 110#. Less than a passenger.2 Gallon Rotopax was empty. Actually weighed all the stuff before piling it on. My aircraft weight/balance training kicked in.

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  20. AdventurePoser

    AdventurePoser Long timer

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    LOL, glad someone else is man enough to admit this....:rofl The R1150 GSA, fully loaded with a full tank of full is nearly impossible to wrestle up right. The lovely flame simply puts a hand on the gas tank and exerts a very slight push-that's all it takes!

    At 5'2 and 110 lbs she is able to get on the bike after I'm ready to go without pulling me to the side!:thumb

    Cheers,
    Steve

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