Wedding Vows in Action: Riding South from Seattle

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by ADVegan, Nov 14, 2018.

  1. Oldschoolrocker

    Oldschoolrocker a.k.a. EZE Supporter

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    Ok now...nothing scary just take your time. Make sure you cut fuel line where it really needs to be cut! External Filter is a WK410 which is a Mann number I think or here in US its cross referenced to a WIX 33310. Heres the link to doing the job..well worth reviewing!!! https://advrider.com/f/threads/guglatech-filtration-system-install-on-1090r.1287730/ Glad you did get the orings! Now read this article to save yourself headache. I have faith you will put it all together properly and ride off into he sunset!!! Thats the key to the whole job!! No fuck ups!!! Your in Mexico man!! Cheers and keep us posted!!!
  2. docwyte

    docwyte Long timer

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    If you put in the large, external filter you pull the stock filter K&N looking filter out and keep the tea bag filter. Which you need to replace. If you don't install the external filter, I'd replace those factory filters with new ones ASAP.
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  3. guglemonster

    guglemonster Crivens!!! Supporter

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    I, the extra step of protection needed to perfectly protect the whole syste is the neck filter, M04006, so if you put the Godzilla and you will put your own inline filter you're good to go.

    make sure to choose a "big" good quality automotive filter, 10 microns, DO NOT GO FOR A SCREEN FILTER, they are way too small and guys, they might look cool, they do not work.

    period

    orings are very important, make sure to mount the cable tie properly after REALLY CLOSING THE CLIPS/white CAPSULE, or you'll be stranded !!!!!!!!!!!

    fuel pump clip-tie.jpg


    1faakw.jpg

    cheers
  4. massiveuniball

    massiveuniball Been here awhile

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    I spy your bike on Zicatelo Beach....
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  5. Sjoerd Bakker

    Sjoerd Bakker Long timer

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    Re your request for route info Pto Escondido to S Cristobal -- just so happens to be a very familiar road for me , love every km of that .
    First an aside to your warm running engine - have you checked the fan motor and the temperature sensing switch in the radiator which turns on said fan , and the thermostat in the rad cap ?
    A faulty fan motor or thermal switch could fail to start the cooling fan . While riding along the air flow will give adequate cooling but when you slow /stop in traffic the heat rapidly climbs . If thermal switch is a dud you can rig a manual switch to power the fan- sold at electric supply/autopartes shops , for a few pesos . Turn fan on in town , turn off when moving well. Burned out motor is a KTM part , but could be replaced by anything 12V that fits

    Your route 20190120090419.png
    EXCELLENT proposal to take three days .
    Day 1
    Really , starting from Pto Escondido after Mex 175 and Mazunte ? - first a known bit of warm coastal lands gets you east by Pochutla /Mex 175 junction and the 150km to Bahias de Huatulco . Do take the slower tour through the actual resort loop - and La Crucecita for lunch , blasting by on Mex 200 will leave you wondering what the fuss is about .

    Exit off Mex 200 at the west end and back out onto Mex 200 again at east end of the Bahias and it will be a steady ride of abot 150km to Salina Cruz in what tends to be hills of scrubby jungle and cactus with several neat scenic areas,a few villages but no big towns .It will be warmish but learn to love that - it beats snow and -16C any day .

    I seriously recommend that you do take the time and effort to visit Salina Cruz and Tehuantepec and Juchitan by way of the older highway mex 200 and 185 which is joined by mex 190 . One could be tempted to take the new toll road bypass -loop from 15km west of Salina Cruz north all the way up to La Ventosa if one was a fanatic about making haste and wanted to avoid seeing much of Mexico . Leave that to the route salesmen and dangerous goods transports.
    Salina Cruz and the other two towns and surrounding part of the Istmo were struck by that major earthquake in Sept 2017 .Damage was severe but each is still functioning and in beginnings of rebuilding . Also each town has hotels open and awaiting customers . Do take a slow ride around town and see what an earthquake can do , buy some refreshment .
    I would recommend you carry on as far as Juchitan and stop for the night at Hotel Lopez Lena . I gather that budget is not a major concern for you, the Hotel Lopez Lena is a fine hotel that has earthquake proof structure nice restaurant , secure parking .It is a top class hotel at modest price . You can go to rooftop for an overview .

    Day 2
    Suggest an early start and make for Tuxtla Gutierrez in day two . Early start will get you across the flat wind swept section of Mex 200 east of LA VENTOSA , maybe before the super North-wind kicks in over a notorious 25km stretch . Beyond that bit the wind will be no issue. It will still be flat coastal land and nice and warm .It is prime mango orchard country but that fruit is not yet ripe ( pity )
    At Tapanatepec you come to the fork in the road - Mex 200 carries east and later south along the coast while Mex 190 spits of to NE and quickly climbs up to grassland hills and pine forest and lower temperatures . .Just splendid country that eventually opens up into highland basin and the Depression of Central Chiapas - farming , ranching ,muy escenico !
    Tapanatepec to Tuxtla GTZ is still about 160km
    Cintalapa ,city up on the plain has a habit of attracting wintertime flocks of small parrots who roost for the night in the trees by the thousands .If you are interested , you could stay a night here .
    Before you hit Tuxtla you pass through a nice bit of mountain scenery and urban groupings of Beriozabal .
    Tuxtla is a totally different style of modern city , lots of hotel choice , I leave that to you .
    If you are having too much fun along the Day 1 stretch feel free to stop for a night in Salina Cruz or Tehuantepec and use Day 2 to get as far as Cintalapa . You will get to SC eventually , no rush required .

    Day 3
    Nearby Tuxtla is the Sumidero Canyon , boat tours offered off Mex 200 east near the bridge over the Rio Grijalva. Chiapa de Corzo is pretty town worth a visit.
    San Cristobal is about 80km east of Tuxtla, again use the old LIBRE mex 190 for the full effect as you climb and climb ever higher into the cold mountains, sightsee the small Mayan towns en route .
    Plunk into any hotel you want in S Cristobal . Get out your puffy coats .
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  6. ADVegan

    ADVegan Been here awhile

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    Awesome, thanks for the thorough suggestions!
  7. ADVegan

    ADVegan Been here awhile

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    We're still in Puerto E. waiting on the package of filters from the states. The last eight days have been packed with Spanish lessons which we've found to be remarkably helpful. If you're on your way through Mexico, check out "Instituto de Lenguajes" in Puerto. Our teachers were great and we got more than we expected.

    The other night after seeing our bike parked on the beach, inmate @massiveuniball came over and drank some beers with us which was awesome. It was great talking to another rider and hearing his experiences- really glad you reached out, and good luck with the rest of your journey!

    Massiveuniball.jpg

    I also took Rachel to an acupuncturist for her digestive issues she's been dealing with for years. Neither of us have any experience with acupuncture but like to keep our minds open. I read about a Belgian man who has a clinic here so we made an appointment. As he stabbed her with the needles, he said "You were the one who emailed me about the motorcycle trip? What bike are you on?" And I told him we were riding an 1190, and he said "Ah it's a nice bike" as he hooked up electrodes to the needles in Rachel's arms and legs. She was giving me worried looks, but the doctor looked up and gleefully said to me "Come here, come look at my bike!". I looked at Rach to see how she felt about that, and I think she was just in shock but I didn't want to be rude so I followed the doctor out to his garage where he had a sparkling new Africa Twin. I asked him how he liked the DSG and he was just giddy, saying "it's so fun, I don't give a shit if it's not "real riding" I'm telling you it's fun!". Turns out he has ridden across the Sahara four times on a 690. Eventually we got back to Rachel, to her relief. Crazy thing is, the treatment has totally worked for her. For years, she'd take a bite of food and feel full or feel stuffed 5 hours after eating. the last two days have been the best she's felt in years digestive-wise.

    Accupuncture.jpg

    All in all, I can't say this is a bad spot to wait on a package- my current view:

    Current View.jpg
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  8. Oldschoolrocker

    Oldschoolrocker a.k.a. EZE Supporter

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    awesome!! Glad you are all good! Got worried for a bit! Cheers!
  9. ADVegan

    ADVegan Been here awhile

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    We decided to leave Puerto Escondido without waiting for the fuel filters. We learned Thursday that they were still in customs in Mexico City so who knows when they'd arrive. We met a wonderfully helpful Swiss woman at our hostel who plans to stay for a few weeks and she is going to try to get the package and mail it via Estafeta to where ever we are at that point. In the meantime I figured we'd take the risk.

    We rode just a couple hours to Crucecito, figured we'd take it easy for our first day back on the bike. We went out to a light house for sunset and goofed off for some pictures.

    LRM_EXPORT_10708808040802_20190128_161834528.jpeg

    The other issue was the bike is running hot. I'm pretty sure this is actually what made the fuel pump failure warnings show up, bot clogged filters based on what I've read. I think I sucked some air into the cooling system at some point so yesterday I did the odd KTM procedure of angling the bike up and bleeding the system.

    View attachment 1521696

    This morning we left Salina Cruz with fingers crossed. We rode an hour and the bike was fixed! Back to cruising on the highway at 190F, and then in town it slowly creeps up to 208. I was ecstatic, finally back to riding and having fun instead of having one eye on the oil temp guage, cursing every small town and speed bump that makes me slow down and riding at 213F with oven-hot air blowing directly on my leg.

    Well, during the next hour stretch of riding the cruising temp went back up again and we were riding about 65mph with a temp of 206, and every town made it climb to 215+. I can only think I got air back in somehow- I've read about faulty radiator caps so maybe that's it.

    Oh also , yesterday, I looked down at my right foot and saw what looked like oil splatter. I quickly looked for oil on the engine case and didn't see any, but man did my brake caliper look clean! Wait, not good. I looked at the brake fluid on the handle bars and it was all there but the fork seals apparently leaked all over the brake.. Need to get that fixed asap as our braking power is pretty diminished now. In Puerto I had gone to get some chain lube, and the guy at the shop said they'd clean and lube it plus wash the bike for $5. Ok, deal. Afterwards, I asked what he would recommend for suspension settings for all the speed bumps. I have never totally gotten my mind around suspension setups. He went to the rebound (right) dial and clicked it all the way to the right- about 35 clicks and then backed off maybe 5. Ok sounds good- what the hell do I know? That's the fork that's leaking now. Just now I tried to get the dust seal cover off to use a little piece of plastic bottle to clean out the seal like YouTube told me to. I couldn't get it foff with the screwdriver in the stock tool kit and didn't want to damage it so it mounted the fender back on and sucked upstairs to type this.

    So to recap, the heating issue went away after bleeding the lines, then came back after 1.5 hrs of glee and delight. The right front fork is leaking oil all over the brakes, and we are in Cintelapa thinking over our next moves. LRM_EXPORT_10658227666336_20190128_161743948.jpeg
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  10. ADVegan

    ADVegan Been here awhile

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    The last post seemed to not like this photo of the bike on an incline in front of our hotel in Salina Cruz. I accidentally backed one of the bleeder screws all the way out. Turned out it was the wrong screw anyway but it took me an extra 35 minutes trying to get it back in at a really funny angle. In the end Rachel came out with her tiny hands and saved the day.

    Maybe I'll have her try doing the whole procedure again to see if that works!

    IMG_20190127_132520.jpeg
  11. Holaday

    Holaday Man of Leisure

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    I assume the bleeder screw you are talking about is for your cooling system. Your fork problem could be related to air build up in forks. Are you aware that you need to bleed air out of forks on a regular basis. Too much pressure in fork leg could be causing the leak. There is a tiny screw on the top cap of each fork leg. Just back this out to relieve pressure. Most people replace them with aftermarket spring loaded pressure relief valves. Not 100 percent sure the 1190 has them but my 990 does. Good luck.
  12. ADVegan

    ADVegan Been here awhile

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    Yea I meant the coolant bleeder on the front cylinder. There are a couple screws there that look similar and when one didn't leak coolant I kept backing out out until it dropped..

    I did not know that about the forks though, that is interesting! The other fork (left) was weeping a tiny bit when I put the bike in the shop for engine work (beginning of thread) so they suggested replacing the fork seals. They were going to re-spring for the added weight too, but I don't know it that happened due to all the engine work and confusion just before departure. I'll take a look at the screws!

    Forgot to mention, where I took the tank off yesterday I stepped on an ant hole with sandals on my feet and these mini-monsters bit my feet up. So I put shoes on and moved the bike over ten feet and promptly stepped in dogshit.
  13. Aces 6

    Aces 6 Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, Over

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    I shouldn't have "liked" the post but the last two sentences were priceless! Memories for a lifetime!! :photog
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  14. Oldschoolrocker

    Oldschoolrocker a.k.a. EZE Supporter

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    I think you need to have the bike up way higher in the front. I’ve seen pics of at least 45 degrees. Try for way higher?
  15. massiveuniball

    massiveuniball Been here awhile

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    On the bright side dog shot doesn't hurt...
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  16. ADVegan

    ADVegan Been here awhile

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    Hmm, maybe.. I know it's supposed to be 20in higher than the rear. It's really hard to find places that allow that and also have some way for me to tie it down so it's upright. I've spent the last three days eyeballing all the stairs I see.

    Weird that it seemed worked this morning though.
  17. Oldschoolrocker

    Oldschoolrocker a.k.a. EZE Supporter

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    I’ve seen pics of guys hanging front of bike way up from the rafters in their garage. Maybe you can find a beam somewhere? Man I wish you luck though. Keep trying!
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  18. ADVegan

    ADVegan Been here awhile

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    Yea I've thought about that, but I don't have ratcheting straps. The mental image of me trying to hoist this behemoth in the air and frantically grasping at the straps while kids wait to use their swing set again has kept me from trying.

    Today we rode to San Cristobal de Las Casas. We'd been hearing good things about it from other travellers so we were looking forward to it.it was just a 2hr ride, the second of which (from Tuxtla to SCLC). had us gain 5500ft quickly. The engine was running super hot and stressing me out, not to mention roasting my chestnuts over an open fire. By the time we created the hill the temp had dropped from mid 80s to low 60s and I actually appreciated my super-heated seat.

    I wanted to prioritize the fork because it was loosing a lot of oil so I found a shop in town and went to see if they could just help me pop the dustcover so I could try to clean the seal. I found Moto Adventure Service on Google and rode over there. I was immediately surounded by 7 guys checking out the bike and I tried to explain my issues. Nobody spoke any English but gesturing and my limited Spanish lessons conveyed the fork issue clearly. We took off the dust cover and used the piece of plastic I'd cut out to clean the seal and a lot more oil came out. In that process we also realised there were some scratches on the fork tube itself.. Shit, maybe a bigger problem than I thought.

    The guy running the shop mentioned something about Guatemala and I asked if he thought I needed a new tube, he said maybe. But he offered to take it off and look and his apprentice started dismantling the front end. They had the fork off in minutes and started cleaning everything up. He explained he wanted a smaller inner circular spring on the seal to help but he didn't have any there. Next thing I know he cut the spring and was fitting it back together, now smaller. He grinned at me and said "Mexican mechanic". Bold move but it paid off, they had the fork back together and holding oil in a few more minutes.
    View attachment 1523262
    I was super grateful because San Cristobal is one of the older towns with very tight streets and I was missing my ability to stop the motorcycle when I wanted to due to the front disc being constantly bathed in oil.

    I'm going back tomorrow to lift the bike and look into the cooling system. Very happy to be getting this sorted.

    Highly recommend the shop, they had a bunch if big beemers and a KTM 1290, so if anyone is in the area looking for work- check them out. The be moving in March he said, but the names the same. IMG_20190129_162046.jpeg
  19. ADVegan

    ADVegan Been here awhile

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    Tapatalk didn't give me permission to post this picture.. at least that's what it looks like to me. IMG_20190129_151838.jpeg
  20. ADVegan

    ADVegan Been here awhile

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    Went back to the shop yesterday morning, and hosted the bike up to bleed the cooling system again. I wanted to really clean the radiator cap because I'd read about people having issues. I blew really hard into the cap, and something small fell to the ground. The mechanic grabbed it and looked up at me confused and said "sponge?". I have no idea where that came from, but I think it was blocking the line between the radiator cap and the reserve tank. I rode it around town and got it up to 208f and then got the highway and it dropped back to 190f. I was thrilled again, hopefully this time it lasts! During the issue, once over 200 it wouldn't go down even at highway speeds.

    We roamed around San Cristobal and did some sight seeing. After dinner we would up at a crowded wine bar where we discovered why it was so crowded- each glass of wine came with tapas and popcorn and cost less than $2 a glass. We took advantage of it, just because it was good economics...

    After some research, it looks like the road to Palenque we were going to take can sometimes be dangerous. Haven't seen too many issues recently, but I'd rather not push it. Instead tomorrow we plan to take the 195 up to Villahermosa which is said to be a scenic ride. It'll be a long day for us- 5.5hrs, but I'm looking forward to it!
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