Western HISTORY Thread

Discussion in 'The Rockies – It's all downhill from here...' started by Colorado Uli, Feb 26, 2018.

  1. pprO.R.A.

    pprO.R.A. Hipster Dufass

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    Thanks Norm,,, Mr. Tittsworth was very interesting to listen to, just as the whole thread laid out the events. You know he was there at the time,,very strong western cow puncher dialog in his speak. BTW did he say he was from Branson MO. at the start of interview? If so then he started out as a true hillbilly.
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  2. cagiva549

    cagiva549 whats a cagiva

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    Wasn’t on the bike that day , it was raining

    74525B31-05E6-479E-B3AF-D7CBA87802DA.jpeg

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    That grade is steep , after pulling back on the road I don’t think I got out of 4th gear in my truck till we started down the other side . I rode over it a few years back on my 950 , much more enjoyable ride than 13 south from Meeker

    Pretty sure that’s the old rr grade on the green hill left of the road in the bottom of the valley in the first picture , it’s noticable in the last picture too . There’s still remains of stuff at the east end of the valley in the first picture too , that may have been where one of the towns was . That would be an interesting place to have time to snoop around , several old structures are visible from the road all the way to Rangly
  3. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    That is Douglas Pass, Baxter is all dirt
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  4. Colorado Uli

    Colorado Uli Must I?

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    No kung fu skills here, although I'm good at hitting the kung pao pretty hard sometimes.
    I remembered posting it and knew it was in the very early days of the thread. Took all of 10 seconds to find again.
  5. Colorado Uli

    Colorado Uli Must I?

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  6. Colorado Uli

    Colorado Uli Must I?

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    Yeah, like Norm already said, I'm sorry to say, but someone has led you astray on that one. Douglas Pass is the modern highway connection between Grand Junction and Rangely while Baxter Pass is about six miles (as the crow flies) to the west of it. Unfortunately, the connector track between the two passes is partially private property and … well, you know how that goes. All locked up solid.

    But, if Baxter pass is too familiar and routine for you, there are quite a number of other dirt roads/tracks that basically accomplish the same further to the west of Baxter. I've ridden most of them but continue to find new ones every once in a while. All eventually end up in the Vernal, Utah, area.
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  7. pprO.R.A.

    pprO.R.A. Hipster Dufass

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    Interesting Info Norm and Uli, and everyone ,,, AHC (American History Channel) has some episodes of western outlaws stories. This morning very early they had the story of Tom Horn and Brown's Park pretty much verbatim as I learned here,,, telling the murders of Rash and Isom as well as Basset. If you can view it you will enjoy.
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  8. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    Stanley Crouse photo of swinging Bridge over the Green in Browns Parks

    Dragon Utah Gilsonite Mine
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    Browns Park Ferry at Jarvie Ranch
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  9. homerj

    homerj 742 Evergreen Terrace

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    East of Baxter Pass, and South East of Dragon you used to be able to find this:
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    It says: Antoine Robidoux passed here 13 November 1837 to establish a trading post at the Green River or White. You can read more about Robidoux here

    I said "used to be able to find this" because several years ago the sandstone rock face fell off, leaving only the very top of the inscription visible. I was lucky enough to see the spot and take the picture above about 2 years prior to the rock face crumbling.
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  10. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    Museum of NW Colorado
    MUSEUM MONDAY!!

    The Wallihans- The World's First Wildlife Photographers
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    The history of Northwest Colorado has no shortage of fascinating characters. A.G. and Augusta Wallihan are no exception.

    The Wallihans arrived in Northwest Colorado in the mid-1880s eventually settling near Lay – located between Craig and Maybell. Augusta and A.G. married in 1885; she was 22 years his senior. In fact, it is rumored that A.G.’s trademark long beard was to help mask the age difference.

    Augusta was a strong woman who embraced the frontier life. A.G. described her as having no fear of ‘God, man or the devil.’ She was also an expert marksman who even put on a shooting exhibition at Madison Square Garden!

    Though the Wallihans stayed busy as the Lay postmasters and running a boarding house, in 1889 Augusta suggested that A.G. should try to photograph the abundant wildlife in the area. Surprisingly, wildlife photography hadn’t been seriously attempted due to the precarious size of cameras and the complicated developing processes of the day. The Wallihans were soon able to trade some travelers for a camera and A.G. began learning how to shoot and produce photographs in the middle of nowhere.

    A.G. Wallihan was soon capturing stunning images of wild animals- the first of their kind. George Shiras, another U.S. photographer, was shooting photos of animals at night with a "strobe trap" in the 1890s, but these weren't the natural wildlife photographs Wallihan was producing.

    Wallihan’s photographs caught the attention of an occasional hunter to the area: United States Civil Service Commissioner, and eventual US president, Theodore Roosevelt. They kept in touch and by 1894 Wallihan had enough photographs to publish his first book. Roosevelt wrote the introduction for it as well as for their follow-up book in 1901. Not long after Roosevelt’s presidential inauguration in 1904, the Wallihans even visited the White House as his personal guests.

    Wallihan’s photography books were a hit. Anything pertaining to the West was in big demand at the time, and these were the first photographs to extensively capture the West’s wildlife in their natural environment. A.G.’s photographs quickly grew in popularity until he was invited to showcase his work at the 1900 World’s Fair in Paris. He was again invited to the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis where his photos earned him the bronze medal.

    Through their work, the Wallihans were vocal proponents of wild game preservation. They were witnessing firsthand and bringing to light the fast decline in wildlife populations due to unregulated sport and commercial hunting.

    Augusta died in 1922 at the age of 86. A.G. died in 1935 at the age of 76 while still serving as Lay’s postmaster. He is one of the longest serving postmasters in US history. They are both buried on a hill above Lay overlooking the country they loved from both sides of the lens.

    The museum has a permanent exhibit on the Wallihans including their original camera, Augusta’s hunting rifle, their marriage license and numerous photographs. Our collection also consists of dozens of their original photographs and glass plate negatives.

    My Great Grandmother worked for awhile at the Lay boarding house, 1900-1901 as my great grandfather on my grandma Kuhen-Yoast side was working for the 7's ranch east of Maybell.
    If you look carefully as you round the corner in lay headed east, look up and to your right about 11 o'clock and you can see the graves.
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  11. cagiva549

    cagiva549 whats a cagiva

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    I did notice something up on the hill top but couldn’t make it out ,

    the swinging bridge looks like it is severely overloaded in that picture too .
  12. ReadyorNot

    ReadyorNot professional olde phart Supporter

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    Uli:
    I just stumbled onto a book in a resale store in longview, texas entitled Murder on the White Sands, by Corey Recko. I snatched it up for the princely sum of $1.61, because of the connections with Lee - Lincoln - Sacramentos - Alamogordo, etc. it tells the story of the killing of Albert & Henry Fountain and the trials and chicanery that followed.
    my wife and I have purchased a house in the high rolls/mountain park community, after several years of planning and are looking forward to possibly moving there long term next year. our place is practically on the NMBDR, and i hope to be able to post up as a support and stop-over resource for adv inmates. we love the area, and I immediately thought about your contribution to this most interesting and useful thread.
    best regards,
    readyornot
  13. Colorado Uli

    Colorado Uli Must I?

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    High Rolls? A great location indeed, being at the perfect elevation to avoid the extreme heat and dust storms of the Tuli Basin as well as stay out of the cold that Cloudcroft dishes up each winter. Congratulations.

    Enjoy the book, and post up some tidbits from its pages once in a while. Won't you?
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  14. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    Museum of Northwest Colorado
    MUSEUM MONDAY!!

    The Deadly Meeker Bank Robbery of 1896

    In the middle of a Tuesday afternoon on October 13, 1896, three armed men entered the Bank of Meeker located in the Hugus Store on Main Street. Two warning shots were fired and the eight store patrons and employees were disarmed and corralled to the center of the room. An estimated $1,600 was then placed in a sack. Everything seemed to be going smoothly for the gunmen, but things were about to go south- like six feet under south.

    Gunshots emanating from inside a bank typically warrants suspicion. This wasn’t lost upon Deputy Game Warden W.H. Clark who was outside at the time. Clark immediately put out the call to help cover the exits of the Hugus store. Several well-armed Meeker citizens happily obliged.

    Meanwhile inside the bank the three bank robbers were instructing their captives to walk single file out the door where their getaway horses were tied-up to a nearby freight wagon.

    Once the trio exited the building behind the hostages, it didn’t take long for them to realize they were staring down the barrels of rifles, shotguns and pistols in nearly every direction. With their options limited, and evidently ruling out surrender, they took the only option left: attempt to shoot their way out of a nearly impossible situation.

    The head bandit took the first shot and struck Deputy Clark in the chest. Then, as soon as the two other bandits left the protection of their human shields to mount their horses, all hell broke loose. A violent volley of shots seemingly came from every tree, wagon and window in sight. When the smoke cleared, two of the bank robbers and one of their horses lay dead on the ground. A couple of the hostages were also hit most likely from friendly fire.

    The third bandit, though struck several times, limped down a side street while continuing to shoot until he finally fell to the ground. He lived for another hour or so until he proclaimed “Oh, mother!” and took his final breath.

    As for the money? It never even left the bank! It was found still sitting inside seemingly forgotten by the obviously novice bank robbers.

    It was later determined that the three now-dead men were George Law, Billy Olmstead and Jim Shirley. All of them had ties in and around Northwest Colorado. None of the men were considered particularly menacing nor had significant run-ins with the law prior to that day.

    It was also discovered that, however haphazardly the robbery unfolded, the bandits at least had the forethought to make getaway preparations. 17 days after the shootout, a camp consisting of rifles, ammunition and a relay of 3 horses was discovered about 6 miles northwest of town. Unfortunately, the horses had been tied-up without food or water and one had already died; the other two were nursed back to health.

    Despite being shot in the chest, Deputy Clark made a full recovery as did the other wounded. Only the three careless bank robbers and one of their horses lost their lives that historic day in 1896.

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  15. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    Found this tidbit interesting, had some stuff on Great Grandpa Elmer I never knew.
    from the Hayden Museum Facebook
    Everyone knows that there were several “towns” outside of the town of Hayden in West Routt County. These would be places like Mount Harris and Bear River. But there is another aspect of the history of West Routt County that we need to mention. How many of the communities (that never really were towns) can you name? These would be places that might have had their own school, or even a post office, but they did not have stores or saloons, or anything of that nature. These communities were close knit families that stuck together through good and bad. They built schools, held church services, all night dances, and took note of what their neighbors might need before making the long trip to town – which sometimes took 2 or 3 days. Often times, they even had their own "section" in the local news of the paper! Elkhead, might come to mind – how about Williams Fork, or Dunkley.

    Today, we will visit the small ranching community of Dunckley – or is it Dunkley?

    The community was about 15 miles south of Hayden in Dunckley Park and the surrounding areas. The entire community encompassed about 12-15 square miles. It is roughly outlined by County Roads 37, (A,B,D), County Road 29 (the oldest in the county), Fish Creek on the West and Willow Creek on the South. However this is a very rough outline because there were homesteads and families on the outside of these boundaries that were very much a part of the Dunckley community. When locating it on the map, Dunckley is most often shown where the post office was located the longest – at the home of Marion Yoast – at the “top” of Dunckley Park

    But let’s go back to the beginning…. brothers, John and Richard Dunckley (of Kansas) came to the area on a hunting trip in July 1887, John loved the area so much he filed on a homestead that would eventually become the Robert Dunckley ranch. The brothers were working in the Breckenridge area with a contract to cut and haul railroad ties for the Colorado Midland Railroad which was building a line from Colorado Springs to Glenwood Springs through South Park. Their brothers, Robert, George, Walt and Tom were also working timber in the Breckenridge/Dillon area. Although originally known as William’s Park, the area quickly became known more widely as Dunckley Park as the Dunckleys established ranches in the area.

    When families in the area wanted to communicate with the "outside world", the mail came from Steamboat to Eddy (near current day “Creek Ranch”) three times a week, and residents would go there for, or to drop off their mail. The DUNKLEY Post office was open from 1892 to 1942. The filing for the post office was originally made under the name “Argo” after John Argo, one of the early settlers in the area and the first postmaster, but since there was already an Argo post office near Denver, the name was rejected. Since the Dunckleys were the predominant family in the area the post office filing was resubmitted using the Dunckley name and accepted, although the name was misspelled (dropping the ‘c’) and thus the beginning of the spelling issues. Residents of the area didn’t even know which way to spell it!

    William and Mary Yoast arrived in 1884, the first settlers in the park, and homesteaded in the park. Starting in 1914 postmasters were members of William’s families (sons or daughters-in-laws) until it was disbanded in 1942 – sons Elmer(my G grandpa)John and James Marion, along with daughters-in-law, Sylvia (Fred) and Maggie (John) were all postmasters at one time or another. The mail still came from Steamboat until around 1923 when George Dunckley and other ranchers pushed for a rural route out of Hayden that would reach 110 families -- this route actually went clear to Pyramid Peak!

    The Dunckley school District #14 was established in 1889 with the first school being built near the George Dunckley homestead (currently Coyote Creek Ranch) – near the intersection of CR 37 & 37D. As with all rural schoolhouses, the building was the center of the community and used for meetings, dances and even church gatherings. By 1913, the center of the community had changed, and a new school was built on land donated by Elmer Yoast in what is known as “Yoast Gulch”. 40°18'4.36"N 107°11'38.91"W

    Beside the Dunckleys and the Yoasts, some other names from the Dunkley community include (not a complete list): Kuen, Widger, Weber (Weberskirch), Weller, Johnson, Hite, Kagie, Omholt, Campbell, Seaton, Clark, Long, Baierl, Watts, Boyles, Sellers, Dobrats, Carroll, Dubeau, Doty, Coon, and Goree.
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  16. cagiva549

    cagiva549 whats a cagiva

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    I don’t remember road numbers without looking at the map , but riding around in them thar hills I do remember what looked like a fairly well established community just north of the Dunkley road coming up from Yampa and west of the road down to oak springs along the road that eventually came out on 13 at the little town south of Craig . The roads around there without 10 inches of crap gravel were very enjoyable riding . But the gravel is some of the worst I’ve ever encountered .
  17. Nailhead

    Nailhead Inclusion Rider

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    With another blizzard in the pipeline, this might be an appropriate read:

    The Notorious Blizzard of 1949 | WyoHistory.orghttps://www.wyohistory.org/encyclopedia/notorious-blizzard-1949

    Twenty years ago, I read a book on this when I was living in the hills west of Wheatland, WY one winter, which was a bad idea-- kind of like beach-reading a book on tsunamis, I would think. After reading the accounts of air-dropping hay, and cowboy's horses stepping over the top wires between utility poles, I starting asking the local old hands what their recollections were, and, though I don't remember specifics, I remember a variety of hardships vividly recalled even 50 years on.
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  18. pprO.R.A.

    pprO.R.A. Hipster Dufass

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    ^^^^ Good stuff gentlemen. The Meeker robbery kinda plays out like an episode of The Rifleman with deputy Clark played by Lucas McCain.
  19. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    Wyoming PBS has a great piece on it.
    https://www.pbs.org/video/wyoming-pbs-documentaries-storm-century-blizzard-49/
  20. Nailhead

    Nailhead Inclusion Rider

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