Western HISTORY Thread

Discussion in 'The Rockies – It's all downhill from here...' started by Colorado Uli, Feb 26, 2018.

  1. oldmanb777

    oldmanb777 Just say NO to socialism!

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    Thanks for bringing this up. Great watch. I remember talk from my parents about the winter of '49. But never understood what they were talking about.
    The newbies that have descended on us, crying about winter, need to understand, it happens. Not totally unusual.
  2. Nailhead

    Nailhead Inclusion Rider

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    I remember discussing at length what exactly we would do if conditions like those of '49 descended on our little pocket of remoteness. 20 miles west of Wheatland (you could easily see town from the county road), and it might as well be the moon in a winter like that living in a county that didn't plow the road.
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  3. oldmanb777

    oldmanb777 Just say NO to socialism!

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    ^^^^^^ Yes, and people were a lot more capable of doing for themselves then. Resourceful and accustomed to more hardships. I'm pretty sure they stayed more prepared for unusual events too.
  4. Nailhead

    Nailhead Inclusion Rider

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    Very much so on both counts, in my experience. One aspect of living there I enjoyed was being around self-sufficient, resourceful people. I learned volumes about self-sufficiency, which I wouldn't trade for anything the Front Range offers.

    One more note about the Blizzard of '49: We dropped a big standing dead ponderosa up there and counted the rings back from when that tree died and sure enough the couple of rings corresponding to the period of that blizzard were as wide as any in that tree.
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  5. doc_ricketts

    doc_ricketts Thumper jockey Supporter

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  6. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z I'm serious. Supporter

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    I noticed there hasn't been any discussion of the western Civil War battles.

    I made a video:



    Jamie
  7. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    Museum Monday
    [​IMG]
    A Brown’s Park Lynching – The Unbelievably True Story

    The murder of a young boy in Brown’s Park set into motion a series of headshaking events that ultimately lead to an innocent (of that crime, anyway) man being hanged. Buckle up!

    In February, 1898, after a night of drinking and poker at the Valentine Hoy ranch, 15-year-old Willie Strang playfully pulled the chair out from underneath Pat Johnson. Willie ran out the front door laughing, but Pat was in no laughing mood. He followed him out the door, took aim, pulled the trigger and mortally wounded Willie. Claiming he only meant to scare him, Pat immediately went on the run.

    John Bennett, an ex-convict and good friend of Johnson, witnessed the event. Despite Bennett’s less-than-stellar reputation, he helped comfort young Willie until his death the next morning. Then he, too, saddled-up and disappeared.

    That's the most sensible part of this story.

    A few months prior to the murder of Willie Strang, Harry Tracy and David Lant - two of the most fascinating characters in outlaw history - escaped the Salt Lake penitentiary and were on the run. They were last seen near Vernal, UT before slipping away.

    Just a couple days prior to Willie’s murder, a warrant had been issued for none other than Pat Johnson and John Bennett. They were accused of butchering Val Hoy's cattle and selling them to nearby miners. Routt County Sheriff, Charlie Neiman, and his Deputy Sheriff, Ethan Farnham, were on their multi-day trip to the remote Brown’s Park to serve the warrant – they had no idea what they were riding into.

    While approaching the Park, Neiman and Farnham spotted three suspicious men on horseback. Surmising that the riders may include Johnson and Bennett, the lawmen quickly rode to the Bassett Ranch to gather a posse. Upon arrival, they learned of Willie’s murder at Pat Johnson’s hand.

    The posse rode out the next morning and tracked down the suspicious men’s camp. Shortly after, Valentine Hoy, a posse member and the man who swore out the original warrants against Johnson and Bennett, was shot through the chest and lay dead.

    The lawmen had actually stumbled upon the camp of Tracy and Lant… and Johnson. It appears that Johnson somehow attached himself to the infamous duo after running into them at Powder Springs - a known outlaw hangout near the WY border.

    The next day, two posse men spotted a lone horseman firing signal shots into the air - possibly trying to locate the wanted trio. Upon approaching, the men recognized John Bennett. He was invited to the Bassett Ranch for dinner where he was arrested by Deputy Sheriff Farnham. Chained to a bed in the nearby post office, Farnham stood watch over Bennett.

    When word got out that Bennett had been arrested, the local residents immediately drew connections, albeit very loose ones, between him and the two recent murders. Around noon the next day, eight men wearing makeshift masks, including women’s undergarments, walked into the improvised prison and disarmed Farnham. They then lead Bennett to the Bassett’s corral gate, threw a rope over its crosspiece and hoisted him up until he was dead. Farnham, after being released from gunpoint, cut Bennett down and buried him a short distance away. His unmarked grave remains today (pictured).

    Johnson, Tracy and Lant were arrested a couple days later. Johnson was taken by a Wyoming Sheriff for the murder of Strang. He was freed by the jury. Tracy and Lant went on to – well, that story was told earlier.....
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  8. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    Museum Monday is back...
    [​IMG]
    Joe Ward first appeared in today’s Moffat County in 1884. In a region known for tough men, Joe Ward was instantly considered a tough man. He filed for a homestead about 20 miles SW of Craig, CO next to the newly constructed “Government Bridge” which is still located on Moffat County Road 17.

    Joe, however, was moving-in with a past. In 1879 he killed a man in Colorado for which he served 2 years in the state penitentiary. After his release, due to his heavy drinking and frequent family disputes (his wife even shot at him in 1882), it didn’t take long before the people of Leadville demanded he and his family leave town.

    Joe heeded the warning and found the homestead at Government Bridge. Here he would move his wife Hattie and their two children: a boy, Clover and daughter, Etta. During the move, Joe somehow managed to murder his traveling companion, Charlie Fox, near the current town of Yampa, CO out of what appears to be jealousy.

    With their house right next to one of the only bridges over the Yampa River at the time, the Wards opened a successful roadhouse that provided food and lodging for travelers. They also became well known for their hard liquor.

    But it didn’t take long for the Wards to again become a nuisance. Joe tried to kill a young cowboy who was smitten with Etta. Then, after a rancher complained that Clover had shot at him, Joe devised a plan to ride to the rancher’s house, call out his name and have Clover shoot him from the back of their wagon. Clover, at just 14 years of age, missed.

    It was also noticed that local horses were disappearing every time Joe left the ranch for a few days. Already fed up with their new residents after just a year, several ranchers took matters into their own hands. In August, 1885, while returning from Rawlins, WY after selling stolen horses, Joe Ward was ambushed by a vigilante posse of local ranchers at Iron Springs. With apprehension not even a consideration, they simply opened fire – every single one of them. Joe Ward was dead.

    After his father’s death, Clover Ward straightened-up and took the major duties around the ranch and roadhouse. Etta, however, soon ended up in the mining town of Rico, Colorado where she worked as a prostitute. Here she took her own life in 1892.

    For the next 8 years, Hattie and Clover successfully ran both the ranch and the roadhouse until tragedy struck again. One evening in May, 1900, Clover was riding his new bicycle home over the Government Bridge after tending to the crops. Since he was running late, Hattie had stepped outside to look for him. As she watched him crossing the bridge, Clover lost control of his bike and swerved into the raging runoff waters of the Yampa. Hattie ran screaming towards the bridge, but Clover was gone. His body was found over a week later nearly 50 miles downstream in Lily Park.

    Hattie, being the sole survivor of the entire family, fell into depression and alcohol. On Christmas night, Just 7 months after Clover’s death, she fell asleep in bed with a whisky jug in her hand. While asleep she knocked over the kerosene lantern at her bedside; the next morning a passerby found the still-smoldering remains of the house. The last of the Wards lay dead.

    Today, you can still view the father/son headstone of the Wards located near the bridge over the Yampa River on Moffat County Road 17. Dino Ride 2019 goes right by the stone
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  9. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    From the Hayden MUseums Facebook
    Tuesday Tidbits -- Your tidbit of Hayden and West Routt County history on Tuesday morning.

    Part 1 of 3 -- Sheep & Cattle Wars in Northwest Colorado

    While the “sheep and cattle wars” were throughout the west, the conflicts on the Wyoming and Colorado boarder was exceptionally violent and lasted well past the turn of the century. Most of the raids on sheep resulting in loss of sheep and some human lives was north of the border in Wyoming, but the Routt County range wars were long and hard fought. Most of the “fighting” was actually between the large cattle companies and small cattle operations fighting over grazing land, with the sheep being caught in the middle. And most of the “fighting” didn’t involve resident sheep, but rather sheep from out of state encroaching on the Colorado grazing areas.

    Cattle were a mainstay in Northwest Colorado beginning in 1871 when the first cattle were driven into Northwestern Colorado. The winter of 1871-1872 was one of the worst on record, but a man by the name of George Baggs – of which the town of Baggs, Wyoming is named – was able to winter 900 head of steers in Brown’s Hole without losing a single steer. This being the beginning of the Brown’s Park cattle years and many a cattle rustling story.

    The number one worry of cattle ranchers during this time was rustling. The area was entirely “open range” which led to mixed herds throughout the region and many a unscrupulous rancher or outlaw ended up with cattle that didn’t belong to them. But it wasn’t always the “outlaw” as we think of outlaws. Often times, a cowboy from a large ranch simply wanted a life of his own and wished to start his own herd. He would file on some land and “acquire” stock from his former employer, or other area ranchers.

    Cattlemen were always looking for more grazing area. Fences were not common at this time (and wouldn’t be until about 1916), and cattle ranged wherever the grass was. Also in many areas, water was an issue. The 1891 “White River Timber Reserve” -- the precursor to the formation of the White River National Forest -- took 750,000 acres of prime grazing land out of the mix. This was a huge “crisis” to the cattlemen.

    On top of losing prime grazing land, the other fear of the cattleman – sheep – were about to become an issue. Cattlemen mistakenly believed that sheep would graze off all of the feed and leave nothing for the cattle – often grazing the grass to the ground and making it not able to regrow. Water was scarce and sheepmen, along with their dogs, could keep their herds near springs or other water sources. Cattlemen claimed that the “stench” of sheep scared the cattle. Often the cattle, not being able to get to water, would wander into other areas.

    However, it needs noted that not everyone was against sheep. There were a few local farmers who favored the incoming of sheep to get rid of surplus hay that was accumulating in the valley, but the cattle barons refused to hear of the “good” of sheep. However there were some prominent sheep men in NW Colorado who were largely “left alone” during the height of the “sheep and cattle wars”. The majority of the problems arose from out-of-state flocks coming into NW Colorado to graze freely.

    The first attempt to bring sheep into Northwest Colorado was in 1894 when Jack Edwards of Wyoming attempted to move several thousand head of sheep into Routt County. Edwards claimed that his flock was being driven out of Wyoming by a bigger rancher. The cattlemen wanted these large out-of-state flocks to be kept out at all costs! A posse was formed and rode to the Wyoming border, meeting Edwards’ band of sheep near Dixon and turning them back. However, sheep did soon enter NW Colorado coming from both Wyoming and Utah.

    The Forest Homestead act of 1906 allowed some of the previously protected forest land to be filed upon for homesteads. This caused people to flock to NW Colorado in search of land, thus encroaching on the “free range” even more. By 1907, the White River Reserve was expanded to 1,133,330 acres but allowed for grazing permits on this land. Grazing permits were open to anyone who could afford them – cattlemen or sheepmen!

    The skirmishes continued and took their toll on everyone. Bands of sheep were often attacked and killed by unscrupulous means – either by clubbing or by running them off cliffs. Sheepmen would stampede cattle or poison water holes. One account states that by the end of 1910, area judges who were so tired of presiding over murder trials and trials resulting from the “war, requested that the state legislature split Routt county into two counties. Their request was granted and Moffat County became its own county on February 27, 1911.

    The Utah sheepmen were especially relentless in encroaching on Colorado land. The sheep and cattle “wars” reached a new depth in 1911 when cattlemen with clubs and knives killed 110 head of Woolley sheep in western Moffat County. The perpetrators were never caught. The citizens of both Routt and Moffat Counties were outraged and sheep growers gained much needed sympathy.

    By 1912, the US Forest Service and the smaller cattle companies were able to out maneuver larger companies which brought an end to “open range grazing” as now carefully controlled grazing was the rule. Because of the loss of grazing areas, the cattlemen were desperate and started harassing the homesteaders in the Forest areas and the sheepmen with grazing permits. The “war” hit a new moral low by 1913 with the use of strychnine on sheep.

    The height of the “war” was marked by the “Battle of Yellowjacket Pass” in 1920. Located between Craig and Meeker, the Colorado State Police were used to help keep the war from becoming deadly.

    Stay tuned to next week’s Tuesday Tidbit for Part 2 and more on the “Battle of Yellowjacket Pass” and Ferry Carpenter’s role in the Sheep and Cattle Wars.
    Colorado Uli, bomose, DaleE and 2 others like this.
  10. Nailhead

    Nailhead Inclusion Rider

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  11. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    Part 2

    Part 2 of 3 - Sheep & Cattle Wars in Northwest Colorado
    Ferry Carpenter’s role in the Sheep & Cattle Wars – “The Battle of Yellowjacket Pass”

    Ferry Carpenter arrived in the upper end of the Hayden Valley in 1905 at the age of 18 to work for JB Dawson on his cattle ranch. He filed on homestead land near the Dry Fork of Elkhead Creek on his 21st birthday. After graduating from Princeton and Harvard Law School in 1912, he returned to the Hayden Valley where he would remain for the rest of his life.

    During the “Sheep and Cattle Wars” in NW Colorado, Ferry Carpenter was a lawyer on the side of the cattleman. He was retained as an attorney for the Hayden Cattlemen’s Association and other cow groups in NW Colorado. Ferry advised his clients to take advantage of the 1916 Stock-Raising Homestead act which doubled the acreage in which one could file a claim on from 320 acres to 640 acres. Much of Routt and Moffat county was being flocked to, filed on, and fenced. All of the watering holes were being fenced, and the large, much needed, open range of the cattlemen was being threatened.

    By 1911, the big cattlemen were complaining about the new threat to their range – sheep. Flocks were coming into NW Colorado, mainly from Utah. The cattlemen, of course, wanted all of the grazing land to stay sacred to the cattle. Cattlemen hired riders to patrol the state lines to keep the sheep out. Usually sheepmen obeyed, but when they did not, troubles arose. In December 1911, five cowmen with clubs and knives killed 110 head of George Woolley’s sheep, southeast of Craig. The sheepmen took this as a warning and generally stayed out of the way of the cattlemen for the next several years.

    However, in April of 1920 Snellen Johnson tried to have a band of his sheep moved into Colorado. Seven armed and masked men bound and gagged two herders and clubbed their entire band of 350 sheep to death. Johnson tried to have the men arrested, but was convinced by the district attorney that the local courts and juries were controlled by the cattlemen. However, just a couple of months later in July 1920, a sheepherder named Darnell had crossed into Colorado. He was killed in his sheep wagon and 686 of his 1,800 sheep were clubbed to death. This extreme act finally caught the attention of the federal government. Six men were arrested and after months of investigation, many prominent NW Colorado Cattlemen were indicted by the Federal Grand Jury. Unfortunately, the federal agents had no better luck with prosecution than the district attorney had.

    Just as the feuds were beginning to subside, cattle prices dropped and many cattlemen were unable to pay for grazing permits on the White River National Forest. Utah sheepmen purchased the grazing permits. Unfortunately, shipping animals by rail from Utah to Yampa, where the sheep would then be trailed about 12 miles to the forest, was very costly. This required shipping from Price, UT to Denver and then back to Yampa. The former governor of Utah, having friends in Washington D.C., and being a sheep man himself, was able to negotiate a much cheaper “solution”. A “stock driveway” was declared from Utah to the grazing allotments on the White River National Forest. The 106 mile long, 6 mile wide “stock driveway” followed public roads and had resting spots every 25 miles.
    Colorado cattlemen argued that the several weeks that it would take for the sheep to pass through their “best” grazing grounds would be devastating to their grass. Ferry Carpenter tried to present this view to the Utah sheepmen, but the sheepmen tried to test the driveway anyhow. As sheep moved into Colorado, tempers rose. By the time two bands of sheep reached Sunbeam, the sheepmen sent word to the Colorado governor asking the state militia to protect their sheep.

    The governor sent out a carload of state police and a couple of motorcycle patrolmen who posted themselves at the courthouse in Craig. There was a protest going on at the courthouse just as the sheep moved through Craig and headed south on the stock driveway. As long as the sheep stayed on public roads, off of private land, nothing could be done by the cattlemen to stop them.

    Ferry Carpenter was working hard for the cattlemen, and fortunately for them, he knew the land. He realized that just as the driveway crossed into Rio Blanco county below Thornburgh Mountain, it ran along Marapos Creek. Both sides of the road were owned by Carpenter’s friend Jap Wyman. Under Colorado law, a road that was bordered on both sides by the same landowner could, upon the request of the landowner, be “abandoned” by the county commissioners. Carpenter phoned Wyman, who in turn phoned the county commissioners and requested that they abandon the road. The commissioners met in emergency session and voted for the abandonment.

    A mob of tense, armed, cowboys waited at the Wyman ranch house as the sheep approached the ranch, escorted by the state police. At 2:00 p.m., just before the arrival of the sheep, the phone rang and Carpenter was told that the Rio Blanco county commissioners had abandoned the road, making the road now private land. The cowboys quickly rolled out hog wire across the road and built a fence. The state police were dumbfounded when Carpenter told them that the commissioners had signed the order and the road was now private property. The Utah sheep owners were forced to turn their flocks around and take them back to Craig to be transported by rail to back to Utah. As the flocks backtracked, cattlemen along the route would attack any sheep that strayed from the roadway onto their property. About 150 sheep were killed and one rancher broke a bone in his foot when he kicked a sheep that had ventured onto his land. The presence of the state police prevented most of the fights and violence, but the incident would be known as “The 1920 Battle of Yellowjacket Pass”.

    Overall, the testing of the legality of the stock driveway was a costly experiment for the Utah sheep owners that ruined some of them financially. Ferry Carpenter and Charlie Temple from Hayden, Joe Neal from Meeker and “Uncle Joe” Reef from Moffat County went to Washington D.C. to testify for the revocation of the sheep driveway. Their main argument centered around the fact that it was Utah sheep using Colorado land, free of charge, and that none of the money from these sheep ever benefited Colorado. They argued that they had nothing against Colorado sheep using the areas, (there were actually 24 resident sheep herds at this time) but that Utah sheepmen, if they wanted grazing permits in the White River National Forest, should have to ship the sheep by rail to Yampa and not graze them freely across 106 miles of Colorado!
    On April 11, 1922, The Department of Interior agreed with the argument and the permit for the stock driveway was rescinded with sheepmen allowed thirty days to remove their sheep. Temple and Carpenter telegraphed the news to Craig and that night a great bonfire was held on the main corner of Craig to celebrate the victory!

    The “Battle of Yellowjacket Pass” is widely considered to be the end of the sheep and cattle wars in Colorado. After this time, most disagreements between cattlemen and sheepmen were handled by the law and through court proceedings.
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  12. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    part 3

    Part 3 of 3 - Sheep & Cattle Wars in Northwest Colorado
    Isadore Bolten – Respected Sheep Rancher

    In 1913, at the age of 28, a small, 5’4”, 120lb, man arrived in the Hayden Valley. He was a Russian, Jewish immigrant who had arrived in the United States about 8 years before and worked his way west. Isadore Bolton was on the lookout for homestead land. He encountered Ferry Carpenter and Jack White building fences north of Hayden and in broken English, inquired about land in the area. They pointed to the area up the Dry Fork of Elkhead Creek. Bolton soon staked a claim and went to work for area ranches on hay crews for $1 per day and room and board. When he had enough money for a team of mules, he went to work helping to build the railroad grade between Steamboat and Craig.

    Isadore was a very thoughtful man who always thought of others. Being a cobbler by trade, he taught many of the children of the Elkhead community how to fix their own. He also was known to show up during snowstorms with his team and sled to make sure the students and teachers made it home safely. He was always checking on his neighbors and making sure people were doing well.

    Isadore was hungry for knowledge of all kinds and was a true connoisseur of books. He could often be found in a library or wherever he could get his hands on books. In fact it was his thirst for knowledge that made him the successful man that he was, and it was in a library in Rawlins that he met his future wife, Ethel Fuicks. They were married in April of 1926 and she rarely left his side.

    Isadore worked hard and saved his money, eventually buying some cows. This would never prove to be his best venture, and in fact he lost a lot of money in the cattle business, However, throughout the years, he was known for high quality, pure-bred Herford cattle. In 1929, the Steamboat Pilot reported him as being one of four ranchers in the area who were known for his Herford cattle. By 1934, buyers from Omaha and Iowa came to Hayden to buy cattle from Isadore. He had shown cattle at the Omaha livestock show in previous years and topped that market making a name for himself. Now they were coming to Hayden in search of his fine cattle.

    Although he was making a name for himself in Herford cattle, Isadore’s best venture was that of sheep. After losing nearly all of a herd of 40 cows that he’d bought in Meeker, Isadore got into the sheep business. This was at the end of the sheep and cattle wars in NW Colorado, and he did suffer some of the wrath of area cattlemen. N.M. Chapman, a prominent sheepman in Moffat County, took advantage of Isadore not having knowledge of raising sheep. He sold Isadore is first bunch of sheep -- about 1000 “broken mouth ewes” (old, bad teeth ewes that were considered worthless). Isadore single-handedly, wintered the ewes, and lambed them out in the spring. With a lot of luck, knowledge gained from reading books on sheep, and hard work, he sold the wool the next spring, and all of the sheep in the fall, clearing nearly $1,000 – a lot of money for those times!

    Isadore had proven himself to be a sheepman and in 1922, Chapman actually partnered with him. They borrowed $15,000 and bought 5,000 head of sheep. The winter range was in western Moffat County and hundreds of these sheep were killed by vengeful cowboys who also burned their sheep wagons and supplies. The aging Chapman gave up and moved to California for the winter, but Isadore actually managed to bring about 3,700 sheep through the winter. In 1924, Isadore was a founding member and sat on the board of directors of the Routt-Moffat Woolgrowers Association which was formed to promote and safeguard the sheep and wool interests of it’s members

    Isadore had proven himself courageous, and hardworking. He also was a savvy businessman and had very good social skills. This led to people wanting to be near him and be in business with him. This led him to be hired as a ranch manager for the Davis-Hugus families of Rawlins. When J.C. Davis was killed in a train wreck at Dotsero in 1909, the ranch was left in the hands of his son Roblin H. Davis. However, Robilin was in business in Denver and needed someone on the spot to manage the ranch. Eventually in 1939, they formed the Bolton-Davis partnership that eventually ran about 20,000 sheep and several thousand cattle in Colorado and Wyoming. Isadore also partnered with Charles McIIyancie of Rawlins in a successful cattle business.

    Isadore raised both cattle and sheep on the same ranch – which was basically unheard of in those times. He was able to make money at times when others were going out of business during World War I and into the Great Depression. He bought one herd of foreclosed upon sheep for just over what the bank needed. This made other sheepmen in the area angry as they had hoped to hold out for lower prices. Now he had the sheepmen and the cattlemen mad at him!

    In the 1920s and 30’s, many homesteaders in the area were abandoning their claims. Isadore was able to buy the land for pennies on the dollar. The Steamboat Pilot notes that in 1928, he bought the Ferguson Ranch for $5/acre CASH – he also purchased the C.L. Fulton place for $2600 in 1933 and that same year he purchased the 2200 acres McKinlay ranch on Elkhead which was considered one of the best ranches in that section. He also owned land in the Twentymile park area. In 1938, George Murphy sold him 641 acres north of Hayden and James Campbell also sold Isadore his place. In a short amount of time, he had amassed over 25,000 acres including land in the Baggs and Rawlins area which he would use to winter his herds. By 1934, several years of low water had led to a major drought in Routt County. The usual 2,000 tons of hay that Isadore harvested was reduced to less than 100 tons. This led to the construction of many reservoirs and ditches in the area to try and catch the spring runoff. Isadore was a major contributor to these, constructing many on his own land.

    In 1933, Isadore and Ethel had purchased the Leslie Kimsey residence north of Hayden. This would be their summer home. He made numerous improvements to the ranch and built many of the buildings that still stand today.
    Isadore and Ethel Bolton were very generous in their wealth. Ethel was known to cook large meals and encourage people to “have another piece of pie”. The welcomed anyone and everyone into their homes in Rawlins and Hayden. Isadore lent money and helped out many other ranchers who had previously opposed him. They were very generous to the communities that they were a part of. Together they donated a city park in Rawlins and offered Hayden the same, but the offer was refused.

    When Isadore passed away in 1952, his estate was valued at well over $2,000,000. “Not bad for a small, penniless man who walked into Elk Head in a cutaway coat and brown derby hat in 1913” – Pat Holderness, (History of Hayden & West Routt County 1876-1989). When the Bolten ranch sold in 1956, it was one of the largest ranch sales in the county at the time – 17,380 acres as well as forest permits and state and private land leases.

    Around 1932, Isadore was asked by the Rawlins Republican newspaper to write an article about sheep for a special edition of that paper. His contribution was short and sweet - “Sheep are the product of intense breeding and axe grown in New Zealand to keep the grazer and buyer crazy . They differ very much in quality and breeding and the man who can guess the nearest to the value of a sheep is called a sheepman by the public , a fool by the grazer and a poor business man by his creditors.”
  13. Colorado Uli

    Colorado Uli Must I?

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    Still a market for wool in the U.S.? I see herds up in the high country, above timber line, and out in the sages once in a while, but not nearly like I see the cattle. (Beef! It's what's for dinner)
  14. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    Man, you need to come up here! Sheep country is Moffat and Rio Blanco County!
  15. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z I'm serious. Supporter

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    In a couple weeks I'll be heading down to the Ouray area to do some filming for a YouTube video about the Million Dollar Highway, between Silverton and Ouray. I've been over it several times in years past. I won't be on a bike. I'll be in my Miata.

    I've read the Wikipedia entry, and a few websites about the road, so I have a good handle on the history and some of the surroundings.

    Just putting a feeler out there for any obscure things or places I might add to my video. I'll be in the area for at least a few days. July 15-17, most likely.

    One specific question I have: When is the best day/time to travel the road when I'd experience the least amount of traffic?

    As an aside (and probably not part of my video) I plan to hike the Sutton Mine trail while I'm there, if anyone is interested in joining.

    Jamie
  16. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z I'm serious. Supporter

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    I’m in Silverton at the moment and I remember reading about a sign out of Ouray that said something like “You don’t have to be crazy to drive this road, but it helps.”

    Is that sign still there? Can I get to it in a low-clearance vehicle?

    Jamie
  17. ramz

    ramz Professional Trail Rider Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,678
    Location:
    Salida, CO
  18. FatChance

    FatChance Road Captain

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2003
    Oddometer:
    13,339
    Location:
    On the road
    Stop at the monument to the snowplow drivers who have been killed plowing that road.
    Nailhead likes this.
  19. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z I'm serious. Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2006
    Oddometer:
    9,725
    Location:
    Around Denver
  20. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Oddometer:
    6,351
    Location:
    NW Colo and SW Wyoming!