Western HISTORY Thread

Discussion in 'The Rockies – It's all downhill from here...' started by Colorado Uli, Feb 26, 2018.

  1. RideFreak

    RideFreak Torque Jockey

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    The Immigrant trail a few miles west of South Pass
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  2. Nailhead

    Nailhead Inclusion Rider

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    There's a lot of history out there on WY 28: the Oregon Trail and the railroad grade from the iron mine up top are plainly visible in many places.
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  3. 2wheelTroy

    2wheelTroy Been here awhile

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    Really enjoyed your information regarding: Baxter pass as I recently stumbled across this pass when out exploring. We are newer transplants to the Fruita area from Nebraska.

    Any good book recommendations for ghost towns or other local old west history that you would recommend?

    Thanks, Troy
  4. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    Where the Old West Stayed young by John Burroughs.
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  5. MrBob

    MrBob Long timer Supporter

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    i-VjX465L-Ti.jpg


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    My great-uncle John.
  6. MrBob

    MrBob Long timer Supporter

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  7. MrBob

    MrBob Long timer Supporter

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  8. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    Nicaagat, “one with the ring in his ear,” was a sub-chief of the Ute Indians and a highly regarded warrior. To the whites, he was known as Captain Jack and had, in 1876-77, served as a scout for Cavalry General Crook in his campaign against the Sioux.
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    Had the concept been known then, Captain Jack would likely have been called a “free spirit,” a man with a checkered history with the whites, intelligent and fluent in three languages, including Spanish. In his death, he became an everlasting symbol of everything that was wrong between the Utes and the whites, an enigma for the ages to reckon with.

    Captain Jack, Nicaagat, was of mixed Apache-Ute blood, orphaned in Utah as a young child. At some point, he ended up as a slave in a Mormon family from whom he learned to speak fluent English, but the experience left him with a hatred of whites. Eventually, he escaped and traveled north to join up with the White River band of Utes in northern Colorado.

    In the 1870s, Ute tribal land in Colorado included the northern area around Meeker and Milk Creek; east almost to the Continental Divide, to include today’s Aspen, and south to the areas around Durango and Ignacio. However, by practice and custom, Ute hunters traveled freely beyond these borders as conditions dictated.


    Just when Nathan Meeker, agent in charge of the White River Ute Reservation in northern Colorado, thought he was making progress in turning the Utes into farmers instead of hunters, Captain Jack would return from his travels and point out the absurdity of proud, brave Utes tending gardens and raising vegetables.

    He would say Utes are hunters, not acquiescent chattel to be ordered around by a man who also wants to steal our horses. Follow me, and the Utes would go hunting, leaving Meeker frustrated and a bit hostile.

    The Meeker Uprising of September 29, 1879, and the beginning of the Battle of Milk Creek on the same day sealed the Ute fate in Colorado. Their 12 million acres of Colorado land was unilaterally taken away (the 1880 Ute Removal Act) and the proud people were shunted off to a holding pen, a reservation in northeastern Utah.

    Captain Jack, who had proudly claimed it was his bullet that killed Major Thomas Tipton Thornburgh in the Battle of Milk Creek, was found not guilty of any crime because that killing was committed during a battle, but thereafter he was on the cavalry radar. When he failed to show for his rations at the northern Utah reservation in 1881, fear ran through cavalry ranks that he must be out organizing a war party to make one last stand against the whites.

    Eventually, he was found in Wyoming, living on the Shoshone reservation, minding his own business, but when seven cavalrymen stormed a building he was in, demanding his surrender (for being off the reservation without permission), he ran from the house, diving into a nearby teepee. When rushed, he fired back and killed one of the cavalry officers. At that point, his destiny was sealed but still he refused to surrender. Wounded in one arm, he slipped out the back of that teepee into another farther away, one filled with bales of buffalo hides, and remained totally silent.

    The officers thought perhaps he had bled to death from his wound but were afraid to advance on his position. Reinforcements and a mountain howitzer were ordered, the cannon aimed directly at Jack’s location. Such barbarism wouldn’t be tolerated today, but it was with some relief when it was ascertained that Captain Jack’s remains, his brains “scattered over four acres” and a piece of his liver stuck to a tree limb, would easily fit into a cigar box. Readers of the Laramie Sentinel were elated to learn of the murder and destruction of Captain Jack.

    From the Hayden Heritage Center Facebook Page
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  9. ROAD DAMAGE

    ROAD DAMAGE Long timer Supporter

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    Hey There Western History Thread fans ............................ :wave

    I've been clearing off some bookshelves lately. :brow
    I've got a short stack of used books and it has made me curious about starting a "Rockies Forum" loaner library of Western History.

    Anybody got any ideas how to set it up and keep track of where everything is, and who's next in line for a particular book?
    It seems that the ability for multiple inmates to be able to "edit" a single check out page would be needed?
    Can we do that? :scratch :dunno

    Please fire away with any and all ideas of how to organize something like this so that it would work smoothly.

    OR, with so many things online these days and cheap books available through Amazon (I despise them! :lol3) ........... IS IT worth it to try to move books around the west from inmate to inmate even at media rate postage?

    Your thoughts & ideas History Thread fans?
    CAN we do this?
    SHOULD we do this?

    Thanks, RD
  10. WYO George

    WYO George Epstein didn’t kill himself

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    It could be done as simply as a thread with a list of all the books. Then when a book changes hands the entire list gets copy/pasted into a new post and just change the one book that has moved locations. We did that on another forum several years back and it worked pretty smoothly.

    I think it's a great idea, books are much better than digitals.
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  11. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    I have a pretty extensive collection also. Some I would be willing to loan out.
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  12. BAGSTR

    BAGSTR BAGSTR

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  13. MrBob

    MrBob Long timer Supporter

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    Maybe I got the gene for baldness from the maternal side. :lol3
  14. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    Friday, October 24, 1913 was a red-letter day in the history of Hayden. It was a perfect October day, not a cloud in the sky! So much planning had gone into the celebrations to take place this day. There was a buzz of excitement in the air. Elk, mutton and beef were all roasting over fires watched by head chef Dick Caraway. 2,000 potatoes raised by the Shelton family were roasting along with many other vegetables from the area. Pies, cookies and cakes galore sat on tables, under tents rented from Denver, waiting for the grand event.
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    One of the happiest crowds that ever assembled in Northwestern Colorado, including many “old-timers” stood around or sat in their buggies or autos while tears of joy rolled down their faces. Their long-cherished hopes and dreams consummating. This day meant that loved ones were closer than ever and shipping in and out of town was not only easier but more economical.


    At 11:30 a.m. as the first passenger train pulled into Hayden cheers went up and a sense of joy was felt by all! Jim Norvell and Sam Walker stood on top of the caboose, right behind the engine, as the train pulled into Hayden, waving their hats and shouting their joys!

    The special train over the Denver & Salt Lake rail left Denver in time to roll through Yampa and then Steamboat, picking up passengers on the way. The train from Steamboat, leaving Friday morning and returning Saturday evening would cost $1.20 for a round trip ticket! The trip from Steamboat took two hours and fifteen minutes which was considered remarkably good time given the new unsurfaced tracks. This time would be considerably less in years to come.
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    The date had been up in the air for awhile. No one sure when that first passenger train would roll into Hayden. The track laying machine had hit Hayden on October 22. Leaving just two days to get the word out that the celebration was happening on the 24th! This didn’t stop the crowds though!


    1200 plates of fine things from across the valley were served to the guests for EACH of the two days of the celebration -- all donated by the Hayden community – along with accommodations for all those who stayed overnight. Hotels were scarce in Hayden, but that didn’t stop the crowds!

    Exhibits of grains and vegetables grown throughout the valley was a wonderful illustration of what could be grown in the driest season ever known in this region. Twenty-four pound cabbages, carrots, sugar beets and parsnips and dry land potatoes were among the highlights. A block of anthracite coal weighing more than forty pounds and two large lumps of bituminous coal from the Sage Creek district stood testimony to the rich supplies.
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    Many sporting events were held both days, although the weather on Saturday put a damper on some of the planned events. Basketball, baseball, football games, and races galore – both of the human nature and that of the horse – and of course bucking events! Steamboat beat Hayden in the basketball game and the football game between Hayden and Craig went scoreless while Hayden won the baseball game against a team compiled of players from both Steamboat and Craig! Cash prizes were awarded to winners of most competitions - $10 in foot races and up to $50 in some of the team competitions! Both evenings consisted of speeches, dances, concerts and Saturday even had picture a show!

    While Friday proved to be a beautiful day weather wise, Saturday morning was pouring rain and there was even snow falling in and around Steamboat. This did seem to stop some of the people from making the early morning trek, but by noon, the clouds broke and although there was a cool breeze, Saturday’s programs were carried out almost in their entirety, with the exception of the automobile race. Due to the wet track on Saturday morning, most of the participants backed out. Knowing the crowd swelled to over 1200 by the noon BBQ, imagine what it would have been if the weather hadn’t discouraged some of the neighbors!

    Less than a week after the celebration, talks were underway to make this celebration an annual event – which it did become! The first Routt County Fair was held in Hayden in 1914 and was born out of this 2 day celebration of the first passenger train into Hayden!

    The train reached Craig just a couple of short weeks later with 170 people on board the train for it’s arrival! In comparison, passenger trains had been in Toponas and Yampa since the summer of 1908 and the first passenger trains rolled into Steamboat in January of 1909. The trip from Yampa to Denver took 11 hours! The last passenger trains left the Yampa Valley in the late 1960's with many Hayden residents taking that last historic ride.

    The railroad opened up the Yampa River Valley to visitors and family, but more importantly it opened up the valley to a more economical way to ship livestock, coal and other supplies. And while the tracks were supposed to extend on to Salt Lake City, the tracks have never made it past Craig…although, 2020 just may be the year!

    Recently there was talk of extending the tracks to Vernal and south to Price, this would of helped the Yampa Valley and the economic downfall we are having due to coal, oil and no electrical generation being cut back. But the BLM put the kibosh to that.
  15. cagiva549

    cagiva549 whats a cagiva

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    Running tracks from Craig west to vernal would be a lot easier than what it took to get to steamboat . After seeing the electric rail south of dinasour I was curious if it connected to the outside world or was local to the area .
  16. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    The rail to nowhere. Goes from the Mine to Powerplant. The BLM shut the idea down due to possible impact on native historic sites that are not yet located.
  17. minerbill

    minerbill Emits Methane

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    That and the rare plants that they won't show you.
  18. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    O yea I forgot about those. Hi @minerbill !
  19. Nailhead

    Nailhead Inclusion Rider

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    That would be addressed during the construction process with a preliminary survey along the proposed route, and excavation, documentation, and conservation following. Standard operating procedure.

    The politics, however, probably wouldn't be so cut-&-dried...
  20. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    Should be that way, but they came out and said they were against it prior to all of that. Granted there are some pretty cool known sites out there. I gigantic clock from the Freemonts, also three astronomical sites that line up on certain stars. They also make a 30/60/90 triangle and are miles apart. The RR would not be close to those from the surveys I have seen. And as Bill said, the rare plants that they will not tell you where they are.
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