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What did you 3D print today?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by beetakingthe405, May 19, 2017.

  1. JohnE65c

    JohnE65c Been here awhile Super Supporter

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    But it's too nice to scuff up with a kickstand.
    #21
  2. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    TUNING FORKS EVEN !!!!

    THAT'S AWESOME!
    #22
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  3. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades...

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    I don't get to do it, but the surgeon is having one of these made up to fit the chunk they cut out of my daughter's skull:

    [​IMG] Pretty awesome. She had a much bigger piece cut out to allow brain swelling from an epidural hematoma. She's going to make a very good, if not full recovery from her injury (caused by a freefall backward after a seizure, striking a tile floor with her right rear skull). The cool part is the use of an MRI to do a 3d CAD print, then fill in the opening with an implant CAD, and finally 3d print it in PEEK. Amazing what they do now. Better than titanium.
    #23
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  4. JohnE65c

    JohnE65c Been here awhile Super Supporter

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    Thoughts and prayers for your daughter making a quick recovery. I'm familiar with this application and process from working in the medical device field. 3D cranial implants with PEEK is state of the art.
    #24
  5. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades...

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    The kid survived what the neurologist and neurosurgeon said most don't. Then the speed at which she is recovering is incredible. Certainly reaffirm one's faith in the power of prayer. Six weeks and she's out of bed, getting stronger, from laying in bed, and speech skills getting better, mostly word substitution, able to carry on a good conversation. As serious as the whole thing was, the word substitution was humorous. Favorite substitutes were "dentist" for doctor and nurse, then general nonspecific ones were "toothpaste" and "lotion" for a variety of things and most paper products being "toilet paper". She is starting to catch and correct herself. Now to get the implant.

    The surgeon explained that they tossed the bone in the trash, due to the deterioration and that the healing leaves a bumpy scalp. Then he explained the process. I read an article and it explained some of the advantages of PEEK for having the bone grow over it a bit and that the expansion rates matched the bone better than titanium. Either way as the surgeon said "Cool, isn't it."

    Worst thing now is the butt ugly helmet that makes hockey helmets look sleek and styling! With all the technology and style in motorcycle and bicycle helmets you'd think they could get out of the 50s with the protective helmets people with voids in their cranium have to wear for protection. I saw the helmet and how it was fitted, I cringed. I did better work for fitting people with a low buck motorcycle helmet, inserting foam for fit. One fellow teacher whose husband knows Troy Lee said I should write to him and ask for help to give my daughter's helmet some style.

    I teach industrial tech in middle school. The other nonindustrial tech technology teachers are all hepped up on 3d printing. I like it but as "fast" as it is for prototyping and for custom medical use, it is slow for 20 kids to do projects. When I asked what was in it for the kids that didn't get to do a project I was told "they get to see it work." Just ain't the same as having something in hand for a 12-14 year old kid though. There has to be something rewarding for the work they do.

    I did laser engraving and also some mini-mill work and want to have that for coding and rapid custom work along with 3d printing. In my industrial experience I know it is more about rapid prototyping and applicable one-off items than actual speed when it comes to 3d printing. I'd love to buy one to play, but not at this point. As we see here in this thread, there's a lot of fun and interesting things that can be done.
    #25
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  6. JohnE65c

    JohnE65c Been here awhile Super Supporter

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    I don't know how sophisticated your school's printer is (or will be), but many can print more than one stl file in one operation. You can then restrict the models' footprint size per student project, load a number of their files, and print overnight.
    #26
  7. TommyBBQ

    TommyBBQ More Road than Dirt

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    Milled this kickstand coaster with 3DCarbide's Nomad 883. Not 3D printed but could've been.
    Wow, no words. Glad she's made it.
    #27
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  8. LeMaitre

    LeMaitre Been here awhile Supporter

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    Made front turn signal stays for a 1975 Honda 550F Super Sport last year.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I need to replace one that broke when I dropped the bike while putting it away for the winter. The other side shows no problems with highway speed.

    -Mark.
    #28
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  9. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades...

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    Yeah, but it would be great to do other kinds of work, since it is really about the CAD/CAM, not 3d printing. Laser engraving is pretty cool and doesn't really take much time and mills are pretty cool too. Students used G coding to do their names or other stuff on a block of Corian counter top scrap when I taught a class that had a mini-mill. Five minutes machine time. That is my thoughts on it. Don't focus on the trick buzz word item - 3d printer - focus on what makes it the engineering part.

    A laser can be had pretty low buck and a mini-mill isn't horribly costly either. Do all three. That was my thing for the industrial aspect. The tech people are stuck on the "latest and greatest" buzz word. When the one school got a laser engraver for their STEM proram is you'd think the laser engraver was some new thing. I was doing laser engraving in 1992. I recommended a great and inexpensive program, for the education version, CorelDRAW at about $125/seat. Corel is a good graphics program as well. One year I took advantage of their old 30 day trial, having each kid download a sample and we made sticker designs then had some made for each student. Instead, they use some free ware program. I tried it out, it cannot have decent dimensional design work done with it like a good CAD or graphics program, but hey, it is free. Spend several thousand dollars on machines then use crappy software.

    I can't even get a decent 3d drafting program to do work for the woods class design work, they don't think with an engineering thought process. Most of the people dealing with STEM don't actually have any kind of engineering/industrial education or background, they just did a lot of stuff with computers, likee video and office computer classes. Most are general subject teachers.
    #29
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  10. WJBertrand

    WJBertrand Ventura Highway

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    Are you making the headlight covers available?


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    #30
  11. PunkinHead

    PunkinHead Moobless Adventurer Supporter

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    Any suggestions on brands/models to look at?
    #31
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  12. Hack'dTiger

    Hack'dTiger n00b schn00b

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    @markk53 I second that motion. :thumb
    #32
  13. Hack'dTiger

    Hack'dTiger n00b schn00b

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    I'd be happy to share a printable file, but if you're asking if I'm printing these for distribution...no.
    #33
  14. Hack'dTiger

    Hack'dTiger n00b schn00b

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    While I'm happy to see "STEM" on the rise, you're right. The byproduct of the buzz is that lots of people don't have the right background. It's a catch 22 I suppose. I'm part of a STEM Academy program, and 3D printing was the tool that got them interested in learning CAD. It's a stepping stone, and plan to grow our program into something that sounds like what you have. Fun stuff.

    As for the software, were you aware that Autodesk offers educational licenses for all their products free of charge? You might look at Fusion 360. It's like a hybrid between AutoCAD and light version of Inventor. It's all web-based (which may be good or bad depending on your needs), and seems to be user friendly from what little I've started to use it. I'm still trying to work around how it shares files, but may be worth looking into for you.
    #34
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  15. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    . that is amazing. thanks for the info. would you mind if I share this picture/story with my Cranio facial surgery fb group ?

    also the drs name? if you prefer to keep it private I understand, but a LOT of kids can benefit from this.
    #35
  16. RichPlusXT350

    RichPlusXT350 Adventurer

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    The first question is what do you want for a hobby: 3d printing or building a 3d printer? My coworker just bought a kit (that I cannot remember the name of....) for 500USD and he was printing after a day of assembly. He also has been slowly tweaking it since he bought it by replacing low quality parts, making it more rigid, and recalibrating, and now produces some very nice prints, however he has spent a lot of time improving it.

    I own a Flashforge Creator Pro (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00I8NM6JO/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_dp_T2_Z8xnzbNY4GR59) which I have done no additional work on beyond initial setup (one hour). I reliably print quality parts although I can see room for improvement - being that most of my parts are structural in nature I'm not too fussy with some imperfection. I also haven't figured dual extruder prints yet, my tests have all turned out terrible. It is convenient to keep two plastics loaded though.

    Lastly I would mention the Monoprice printers (https://www.monoprice.com/pages/3d_printers) which are rebadged Chinese printers that get decent reviews. With that said the price is right, you can get a printer for under 300USD, and supposedly later this year the price will drop below 200.
    #36
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  17. beetakingthe405

    beetakingthe405 Limit your always and nevers

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    As an engineer, I see this all the time when people find out I have a 3d printer. They ask me to make figurines or personalized this or that. It bugs the hell out of me. I print exclusively functional parts which are usually a) replacing something I broke, b) cheaply making something that would otherwise be expensive (quick turn throttle tube for example), or c) a new and novel item that would be too expensive to mill or lathe.

    The problem is G-coding and drafting and such are pretty outdated. The best thing I think you can teach is 3d modelling, with Google Sketchup or OnShape. Then the next thing is design for printability, such as using as little support as possible (reducing overhangs), designing features for hardware such as hexagonal pockets for nuts so you can bolt parts together, considering where you need strength and how print orientation affects that, and finally, printing a part to fit with other parts nicely because printing has it's own tolerances that are much different than milling and lathing. There's a lot you can do if your goal is to teach the students how to problem solve. Heck, just buying and setting up a printer could be the first project.
    #37
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  18. beetakingthe405

    beetakingthe405 Limit your always and nevers

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    I have an old Monoprice printer that was basically a rebadged Makerbot/Flashforge. Best and cheapest printer we have at work.
    #38
  19. Hack'dTiger

    Hack'dTiger n00b schn00b

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    Good info for the group, thanks, but I was looking for a referral on a good laser engraver. :beer
    #39
  20. WJBertrand

    WJBertrand Ventura Highway

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    Ok thanks.


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    #40