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What did you 3D print today?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by beetakingthe405, May 19, 2017.

  1. TommyBBQ

    TommyBBQ More Road than Dirt

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    I use SolidWorks (educational license) and SketchUp (open-source by Google's Trimble). I especially love SketchUp. It can even do animations.

    For printers, at the Naval Postgraduate School we have several Ultimaker 2s, 2+s, 2ext's, etc. Love them and when I leave here I am going to buy one (saving pennies).

    I also use 3D Carbide's CNC mill, the Nomad 883. I LOVE the mill, and may get my own before the printer. The mill can do any plastic (delrin, polyethylene, etc), wood (oak, ply, etc), and even metal (aluminum, titanium if in lubricant).

    As for Laser Cutters/Engravers, I am skeptical. We have a big GCC LaserPro SprintGLS, which works as a printer through CorelDraw. While fast, it typically can't cut much more than 1/4", and can't do metals because of the reflections. It can do the lettering and stenciling with the black paint-like substance that we spread over aluminum...
    #41
  2. RichPlusXT350

    RichPlusXT350 Adventurer

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    For lasers I've used ULS and Epilog at TechShop. Both are very capable although the ULS is the superior product in my opinion. They also are quite expensive.

    I really want to buy my own laser cutter but cannot justify the cost. From my review of the Chinese importers I picked Boss as my favorite, but didn't pull the trigger on it. Other companies to look at would be Rabbit and Full Spectrum Laser.

    The lasers I worked on were 60W at TechShop, and wouldn't buy anything lower wattage. It is enough to cut thin MDF and acrylic well. If you want to cut metal, you are in a completely different ball game (different type of laser actually producing different wavelengths).
    #42
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  3. Hack'dTiger

    Hack'dTiger n00b schn00b

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    Good info, thanks. Capability to cut thin (<1/8") aluminum would be nice...but mainly for acrylic, wood, cardboard, etc. I'm also looking at a CNC router table, and would welcome any input there as well.
    :beer
    #43
  4. RichPlusXT350

    RichPlusXT350 Adventurer

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    Just job out any aluminum laser jobs. In Arizona (TechShop) I did 1/4" aluminum parts on the waterjet, but I also got quotes for the 24"x24" telescope rings, and they would have been about $100 each including material. Between the tool time, my time, and material it really was a wash between doing it myself and jobbing it out.

    CNC routers are very capable tools, although I have only used a ShopBot. I would recommend them unless you want to build it yourself (same question as above: do you want your hobby to be making things or building a CNC machine?). Most of my experience has been on CNC mills which are also expensive, but it is the primary money maker of my father's small business.
    #44
  5. Hack'dTiger

    Hack'dTiger n00b schn00b

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    This would be for educational use with kids in our after-school program. I'm trying to see how much money we have left in the budget this year, and will be looking at some sort of equipment to add to our shop/makerspace. Currently the only "CNC" equipment we have are 3D printers, and I'm looking to up our game a bit.
    #45
  6. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades...

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    Laser engravers, some wood, possibly Corean (counter top plastic/stone composite) if it will work, makes for some great plaques and such. Another great one with Corean and metals is to get a mini-cnc mill. I've had experience with both and projects can be a lot of fun. I did CorelDRAW (and still do at times for gaskets and graphics) with the engraving and it is really fun with good projects. Plus if you find a local sign shop that will work with you, students can make stickers, then have them printed and cut, using CorelDRAW. The mini-mill is harder to get more creative for kids, but usually can be run both with written G-code or importing CAD files.

    It's a shame schools gutted and dumped the industrial arts/technology programs and now are replacing them with classes frequently guided by people who may not have ever used an engineering by design thought process or possibly even any sort of actual industrial/engineering kind of courses. Before returning to teaching I spent a decade in industry, yet the school's curriculum person and the computer tech (aka video and general programs) do not understand anything about actual industry practices and intent. They just follow the buzz words.
    #46
  7. WrenchMonkey

    WrenchMonkey Two wheel slave

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    I don't have any experience with 3D printing but I had a thought today while waxing my 36 year old station wagon. What would I need to do to have someone recreate the original badging on my car? It's a 1981 Subaru DL that's nearly original but the badges are crumbling. Thanks for the input
    #47
  8. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    our local library has a3d printer.... you might do better to slop around for printing-by-the-hour shops and let the kids work more on the designing process instead of the execution.
    #48
  9. VX Rider

    VX Rider Long timer

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    Take some good pictures with 12 3D, then get them off to a printer that can make a stl file of them and print them for you.
    #49
  10. PowersUSA

    PowersUSA Adventurer

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    Shown bellow is an adapter plate I designed and 3D printed for mounting a gas can to the rear seat base of my 2012 Super Tenere without needing to drill any holes. The plate bolts to the four holes normally occupied by the rubber standoffs. The standoffs are in turn pressed into the plate for supporting the gas can. I designed the part in Fusion 360 and printed it in ASA plastic (a UV Resistant polymer intended for use outdoors) on my Prusa MK2 printer. The print is at 5 layers per mm with a 20% honeycomb infill and took about 8 hours and 30 minutes to complete.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #50
  11. TommyBBQ

    TommyBBQ More Road than Dirt

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    That looks fantastic, PowersUSA. Great work. I hear the Prusa is the bee's knees too. Do you concur?:dunno
    #51
  12. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades...

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    FWIW Off topic. My daughter was released from the hospital for home rehab and is going to have near 100% recovery after all works out. Another month and they will be doing the 3D printing of the plate for the void in her skull.

    Cool! Thanks for thoughts and prayers.

    Now back to the subject...

    I like that rack plate.
    #52
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  13. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    most excellent, carry on strong woman !
    #53
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  14. wbm

    wbm I ride.

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    I went shopping for a GPS unit to lay down some tracks when I take the KTM out on the trail. Then I realized I have a perfectly usable iPhone 4 lying in a box somewhere. None of the available mounts seemed adequate enough to ensure my iPhone wouldn't go flying over some high speed whoops are a vicious crash…

    A coworker and I sketched up a mount in SolidWorks that attaches to the bars between the clamps and secures the phone with zip ties. I've been out twice with this setup and it works perfectly for the application. I may design a clamshell to capture the phone with a single fastener so I don't have to cut the ties.


    I like it so much I may even have a set machined and anodized!

    Attached Files:

    #54
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  15. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    that's pretty sharp.

    if you prefer landscape mode, there is a iPhone sized bar pad....

    s-l1000.jpg
    #55
  16. LeMaitre

    LeMaitre Been here awhile Supporter

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    After looking for a magnetic cup holder and not finding one suitable, I created one with Sketchup. Printed with Makerbot Replicator 2 plus. I found a five pack of cabinet magnets that attach with one screw.

    [​IMG]

    I use Sketchup because that is what I learned on. Not really pleased with the rendering of curved surfaces though.

    -Mark
    #56
  17. Hack'dTiger

    Hack'dTiger n00b schn00b

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    Have you played with adjusting the circle resolution? You may be aware, but you can adjust the number of edges when you create curved line work. It's meant to let you keep face count down, but for printing you may have to jack it up. I think the default is '12', but '24' is pretty smooth. Adjust as necessary.
    #57
  18. LeMaitre

    LeMaitre Been here awhile Supporter

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    Thanks for the tip. I started a new project and noticed it was at 24 already so I changed it to 100. Drew a 3x4" Cylinder and exported it then into Meshlab. The flat spots are definitely smaller.

    -Mark
    #58
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  19. Hack'dTiger

    Hack'dTiger n00b schn00b

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    Good deal. If you turn on hidden edges it'll probably give you a better idea, too. You could easily see all of the faces that way.
    #59
  20. TommyBBQ

    TommyBBQ More Road than Dirt

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    There's also an extension for adding corners to edges, even converging edges.
    #60