What did you do IN your Garage today?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by JimVonBaden, Dec 17, 2012.

  1. ydarg

    ydarg Miscreant

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2015
    Oddometer:
    1,930
    Location:
    Above the Equator
    Yeah, I hear you. That’s a one car garage with 4 bicycles, two kayaks, a motorcycle with luggage and that honking toolbox along with the usual superfluous garage stuff. It’s somewhat organized for what it is.

    IMG_3320.jpg
    Mr Head and Jaws like this.
  2. RC Pilot

    RC Pilot Shut up and fly!

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    8,931
    Location:
    The garage
    New battery in the Bandit (no pics). Came out from work the other night (25*f) and she barely started. You never really think about batteries until something does not or almost doesn't start. The battery was the one in it when I bought it in Feb of 18. So, I get a new battery; Firepower AGM with 175 cca. When I pull the old one out I see the PO had put an Autozone 120 cca bat in it at some point. He did not ride in the winter so it must have worked fine for him. She cranks quite well with the higher capacity unit installed.

    Set up flaps on a Turbo Timber I picked up a couple days ago.
    Mr Head, Night_Wolf and DHC-2 like this.
  3. Mr Head

    Mr Head Adventure Hippie Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2003
    Oddometer:
    14,403
    Location:
    San Clemente, CA
    Yesterday I pushed the 990 out and went for fuel and groceries. Once, back to the shed, I fiddled the rebound settings a little. I've ignored the suspension settings for a long time. They were good enough as they were for droning along, but not for fun.
    I had noticed when I rode out to Colorado and back the rebound needed looking after, but was focused on burning miles.
    So, notebook out, checked where I had them. Cranked the rear shock closed then opened back up to my new setting. Same at the front.
    From here I'll move them either 5 or 3 clicks in the direction I figure they need to go, depending on feel. After that two then one.
    The thing about the rear of the KTM is the spring feels very stiff. Or at OEM set up there is far too much compression damping. I'm thinking that is it.
    The mismatch to the forks softer setting make it hard to find a balance for me. I'm still messing with that side of things.
    I've had both ends revalved, the rear specifically for less compression damping.
    All the expert professional wisdom say the springs at both ends are right. That leaves it to damping settings and internal setup.

    So, for winter I'll fiddle it a bit.
    What I've done in the past is ride out to the dry lake for a long day of testing and fiddling. Notebook, screwdriver and seat of the pants are the tools.

    So, that is it. Both ends have new settings for rebound. I think I'll look at the rear compression today. Maybe do a little test riding on the street. Not really hard to feel since I just ride it over a course of dips and bumps, with a few turns for direction change. No need for elevated speeds, just looking for a firm base.

    In a small garage, this means the bike sits outside to have room enough to get my old creaky self down on the ground to get at the rear rebound. Of course up front the compression is on the ground, where I have to lay down on my back to get my bifocals where I can see. :gerg
    :imaposer
  4. Lycan1

    Lycan1 Grizzly herder

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,572
    Location:
    Calgary
    Yes, age sometimes requires new tools like this.

    IMAG0878.jpg
    Doesn't help with the eyes but sure does with the back and knees.
  5. tominboise

    tominboise Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,807
    Location:
    Boise, ID
    I rode my Triumph 800XC around the local area for a bit and then changed the oil and filter. I see that I average 1000 miles per year on this bike - not nearly riding enough. I need to step away from my job and into retirement so I can start riding somewhere other then the office.
  6. NorthBayPete

    NorthBayPete Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2013
    Oddometer:
    100
    Location:
    North Bay, Ontario, Canada
    TW200 gas guage! I drilled two holes in my tank and soldered in a couple pieces of 3/16 brake line. Joined them with a piece of clear fuel line and voila. XT350 tank with a fuel sight glass. 011.JPG
  7. unfocused_adventure

    unfocused_adventure Not my circus, not my monkeys... Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2019
    Oddometer:
    61
    Location:
    Auggieland FL.

    Just a suggestion. Unless you know that fuel line wont soften up from the fuels or turn very brittle from the UV, I'd still zip tie 'em for prevention of spit spat and sputter... but i'll hand it to you, good work!
    SmittyBlackstone likes this.
  8. greasyfatman

    greasyfatman Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2014
    Oddometer:
    2,688
    I know that motor well. Are you doing a piston and rings? Hope you didn't go for Chinese parts, like snow flakes no two are alike.

    Attached Files:

    SmittyBlackstone likes this.
  9. Lapchik

    Lapchik Tinkeritis posterboy

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,519
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Good excuse to buy safety wire pliers!
  10. VietHorse

    VietHorse Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,972
    Location:
    Recalculating... recalculating.... HCMC-Vietnam :)
    Guess what I am doing???


    [​IMG]
    NorthBayPete likes this.
  11. SilkMoneyLove

    SilkMoneyLove Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,121
    Location:
    Minneapolis
    Thanks for the details. Yes on Chinese but no on me ordering. The Dad did that. He also ordered the PW50 set by accident, hence the waiting for the next set.
    My guess is the CN bits will last a year or two, then Cam will be 16 and driving. The 80 will get stuffed to a back corner and forgotten.
    Thanks for the specs though. I have saved them.
    Night_Wolf and SmittyBlackstone like this.
  12. greasyfatman

    greasyfatman Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2014
    Oddometer:
    2,688
    I will buy the take off cylinder and head if it is OEM Yamaha.
  13. Themastermike

    Themastermike Think you caught me in a coma Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2011
    Oddometer:
    3,056
    Location:
    So Ill
    I give
    VietHorse and SmittyBlackstone like this.
  14. Riteris

    Riteris Dessert Runner

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2002
    Oddometer:
    4,843
    Location:
    A place many ADV Riders fear: The Nation's Capital
    Feel free to let us know.
  15. armith

    armith Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2013
    Oddometer:
    139
    Location:
    Youngstown, OH
    Turning an old bike into a flower planter??
  16. rodrigzj

    rodrigzj Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2014
    Oddometer:
    321
    Location:
    Culver City, CA
    Finding TDC?
  17. Tall Man

    Tall Man I'm out in the club and I'm sippin' that bub

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2007
    Oddometer:
    6,111
    Location:
    The Occident
    Here's one you won't read here every day.

    Having paid dearly for a vintage Tecalmit grease gun, it was received in non-working order. Grease of unknown provenance was caked solid inside. The spring mechanism was stuck solid. None of the solvents I dared to use for overnight soaks (and I keep some nasty $hit in stock) made a bit of difference.

    I had one last play.

    With Mrs. TM away for 3 hours, I boiled some water and carefully inserted the spring pump body therein. Not 30 seconds later, I heard a distinct pop. One minute after that, a ring of brown froth formed along the edge of the pot. The steam took on a familiar scent, also.

    Familiar when in the garage. In the kitchen, not so much.

    [​IMG]

    Sensing success, and knowing there were tracks to cover, I carefully rinsed the pot and lit one of the innumerable scented candles that the Missus keeps on hand.

    A quick reassembly and test on the work bench revealed the proper compression. A bit of the old grease, now well-thinned and, uh, greasy, came out easily and in the correct manner.

    Yay Me.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The little vintage grease gun was purchased as a perfect solution to add lubricant to the zerk on the Ural's main driveshaft. It's almost inaccessible, and standard grease couplers simply don't fit.

    Tecalmits were standard tool kit components on [then new] Jaguars and the like.
  18. Pokie

    Pokie Just plain Pokie.

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2013
    Oddometer:
    3,635
    Location:
    Fort Collins, CO
    Single pointed a tool to remove the steering head bearings from my BSA M20 frame. 1 1/2-24 thread. Didn't make it fancy, just wanted to get the bearings cups out. Made the thread a little tight to make it as strong as possible as there's only 2 to 3 threads engagement.
    doc moses likes this.
  19. Sidevalve45

    Sidevalve45 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2014
    Oddometer:
    28
    Location:
    West Coast of Wisconsin
    I made a wooden sleeve for my battery box on my Harley WL45. The existing sleeve I had was for a small lead acid battery which usually went to hell in two or three years and caused damaging corrosion to the sleeve and my precious original battery box. I've been running a agm battery in my other old bike for four years with good results even though the battery sat on my bench for at least three years before the bike was ready for the road. They will now accept the same agm battery.
  20. VietHorse

    VietHorse Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,972
    Location:
    Recalculating... recalculating.... HCMC-Vietnam :)
    :lol3 :jack

    [QUTE="Riteris, post: 38821232, member: 1622"]Feel free to let us know.[/QUOTE]
    :D :-)

    :rofl:imaposer
    Hahah, I like that idea, but wait until the bike is parted out :) :) looks like it's gonna be a long time....

    Bingo! You are the winner! Yes, a tool which is super easy to find in a tropical country for TDC determination:)
    Great catch! :clap:clap
    SmittyBlackstone, armith and rodrigzj like this.