What do you cook/eat when camping?

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by tafflink, Dec 3, 2007.

  1. UnclebudinTX

    UnclebudinTX Half Moose Whiskapalian TEX-LEX

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  2. radmann10

    radmann10 Derf Supporter

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    Next best thing and about the same price.... Jetboil MiniMo.jpg
  3. Kinsman

    Kinsman Ribs....for her pleasure

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    I use those a lot too. Cheap, filling, tasty. A can of chicken or some thuringer or other meat added for protein.
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  4. Ladybug

    Ladybug Bug Sister Supporter

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    For the Knorr, Uncle Ben's, etc. I use a 16oz wide mouth Thermos. In the morning while doing breakfast I boil water, Put dinner in the thermos, add boiling water, close top tighly and store somewhere in the bike. At lunch or dinner it is cooked and ready to eat. How hot it stays depends on the weather and where it rides. Many package meals are too much for the 16oz so I split it if needed and store in ziplocks. When I don't want to deal with washing the thermos I put the dry contents in a ziplock, put it in the ziplock and add boiling water, sip shut and add thermos top. When it time to eat I often eat out of the ziplock. The bag is a little more difficult to eat out of but sometimes I don't want to waste water for washing dishes. I use freezer zip locks since they are tougher. - Note: There are some that say using ziplocks in this manner is hazardous so use your own judgement if you want to do it.

    There are a lot of options for making your own dried meals on the grocery shelves. I always try it at home before taking things with me riding. I don't want to be out in the middle of nowhere and discover I don't like what I have for dinner. Then again most times at the end of a good day riding almost anything tastes good. :D
  5. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    I found that potatoes were always available and what I now know as feta cheese. Eggs too, although almost always pre hard cooked.
    Those were the staples for weeks. I could sometimes get olives, and occasionally come across a fisherman.
    I would buy a couple of boxes of tea leaves at a time - this was sometimes used for barter. Coffee was not available for most of the trip, and never nice when it was.

    I don't recall any meat, except in restaurants, and then not always. Villages had meat, but not of any sort I fancied. Hanging in the sun with strips of tin foil to keep the insects off is not my idea of appetising.
    Once you get so far away from home, buying food ready made is as cheap as sourcing, preparing and cooking your own. Plus you have to collect twigs and wood - in competition with the locals, who are better at it and need it more than me.

    Most countries grow at least a modicum of fruit, sold fresh on markets or right at the side of the road. Some fruits don't keep very long at all, so toss them once you have had your fill. Proper dried fruit like raisins, figs, prunes and dates have vitamins and dietary fibre.
    If on a long journey, you will be away from vitamin reinforced bought food. Topping up on fruit is a good start on not being ill in the wilds.
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  6. motomecha

    motomecha Adventurer

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    When travelling I'll drop into town towards the end of day and pick up some lamb chops or steak along with a bag of frozen veg. The frozen veg will keep the protein cold whilst trying to find a camp and makes for a delicious side dish to the main meal. Have spent a good few hours in 30+ celcious trying to find a camp spot thinking "steak is getting warm and will be ruined" only to find that all was still kept quite cool and safe.
    Tis a good trick with the frozen veg if yr wanting some real meat on your travels ;)
  7. goosecreek

    goosecreek A day late and a dollar short. Supporter

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    I would freeze a steak around a large bottle of beer(empty), slip a full bottle in place of it. When I got to camp I had cold beer and a steak.
  8. oldadvtraveler

    oldadvtraveler Been here awhile

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    your name must be MacGyver! job well done! :photog thankfully you have no patent on this, right?
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  9. Chrismcp12

    Chrismcp12 Been here awhile

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    That takes my idea of freezing a steak and putting it in a bag with a couple cans of beer to the next level.
    Brilliant


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  10. River-Runner

    River-Runner Been here awhile

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    We really like this meal with a little french bread. Tortellini and pasta in a jar. Cook the pasta, dump in the pesto. One pot and it will stick with you. Hardly any cleanup.

    I don't like a lot of salt and this is not salty like most prepared foods.

    We often have limited water so we don't waste it on dishes.

    Attached Files:

  11. River-Runner

    River-Runner Been here awhile

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    We don't like to cook a lot.

    We've bought Subway Sandwiches in the afternoon and asked for the oil, vinegar, etc. be on the side in a zip lock bag or such. This way they taste fresh when we eat them.
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  12. BigEasy

    BigEasy Fish Eyed Heathen

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    That is a brilliant idea. A buddy that I fish with turned me on to it a few years ago. I do it all the time for work. I work out in the boon docks a lot or am in situations where I can't leave site for lunch. Works a treat. I will also grab the Arby's deli style sandwiches they hold up well.
  13. MaverickNC

    MaverickNC Gnarly Dude

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    I know Jerky is a camping/hiking/motorcycling staple, but I find the main commercial brands sub-par.

    It's probably because I grew up chewing on Cattaneo Brothers Jerky back in California. Made in my hometown of San Luis Obispo. This is far and away the best Jerky I have had IN MUH LIFE. Holds up amazingly well. Not greasy. Cut off a knot and enjoy it for 5-10 minutes. Damn good stuff.

    http://www.cattaneobros.com/

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
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  14. staudio

    staudio Time to take a ride.....

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    Also a SLO native and can attest to how really good Cattaneo Brothers jerky is. My dad knew the family so we often had some of their jerky in the house.

    There was some type of riff between the family many years ago. I don't know the whole story but I don't believe it is run by the Cattaneo family anymore, but regardless the jerky is still great.
    One of the brothers branched out and started his own company and his stuff is good as well. To me it has a different texture and difference taste (maybe less spices than what
    Cattaneo) but its still good jerky, bought a pound last time I was down there.
    http://raysownbrand.com
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  15. David321

    David321 n00b

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    For trips, I use special plates for ease.
  16. MaverickNC

    MaverickNC Gnarly Dude

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    Those look pretty good! Never considered checking out mobility/aid sources for camping gear, but it does make sense!

    I've been using a Sea to Summit X Plate because of the walled edge, like the plate you posted. Makes one-handed eating a heck of a lot easier! Can even eat stews, chili, and other similar one-pot camp meals in it.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004BKNJW...t=&hvlocphy=9009996&hvtargid=pla-392487198851
  17. Bill 310

    Bill 310 Poser Emeritus Super Supporter

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    Seagulls prefer pepperoni


    http://www.timescolonist.com/news/l...oni-seagull-fiasco-has-been-lifted-1.23247203

    Lifetime ban from Empress for pepperoni seagull fiasco has been lifted

    Katie DeRosa / Times Colonist

    APRIL 1, 2018 03:18 PM

    Seventeen years ago, Nick Burchill stayed at the Empress for a work-related conference. He was in the Canadian Naval Reserve and his navy buddies asked that he bring Brothers pepperoni, a Halifax delicacy for a ship,” Burchill wrote in a Facebook post about the ordeal.

    His pepperoni-packed suitcase was misplaced by the airline and arrived in Victoria a day late.

    Burchill felt the pepperoni was still edible but thought he should keep it cool until he turned over the goods.

    His fourth-floor room facing the Inner Harbour was large but lacking a refrigerator.

    “It was April, the air was chilly. An easy way to keep all of this food cool would be just to keep it next to an open window,” Burchill said.

    He spread the packages of pepperoni on a table and along the window sill, then went for a leisurely four- or five-hour walk.

    A surprise awaited when he returned.

    “I remember walking down the long hall and opening the door to my room to find an entire flock of seagulls in my room,” Burchill said. “I didn’t have time to count, but there must have been 40 of them and they had been in my room, eating pepperoni for a long time.”

    Burchill discovered that spicy pepperoni does not agree with a seagull’s digestive system. The room was covered in guano.

    Burchill’s entry startled the birds.

    “They immediately started flying around and crashing into things as they desperately tried to leave the room through the small opening by which they had entered,” he said. “Less composed seagulls are attempting to leave through the other closed windows. The result was a tornado of seagull excrement, feathers, pepperoni chunks and fairly large birds whipping around the room.”

    Lamps tumbled to the floor and curtains were trashed.

    Burchill waded through the flock and opened the remaining windows to let the gulls escape.

    “One tried to re-enter the room to grab another piece of pepperoni and in my agitated state, I took off one of my shoes and threw it at him,” he said.

    When the intruders were down to one remaining seagull, he chased it through the room as it held a “big hunk of pepperoni in its gob.”

    He grabbed a towel, captured the bird in it and threw it out the window.

    Unbeknownst to Burchill, the shoe and the towel-encumbered seagull fell to the Empress’s front lawn amidst a group of tourists walking toward the tea room.

    By then, it was almost time to attend a dinner with customers.

    But Burchill had only one shoe. He went out and found it, damp from landing in a wet patch of soil.

    Back in his room, Burchill tried to dry the shoe with a hairdryer. When his phone rang, he was startled and the hairdryer fell into a sink filled with water.

    “I don’t know how much of the hotel’s power I knocked out, but at that point I decided I needed help,” Burchill said. He called the front desk to ’fess up.

    “I can still remember the look on the lady’s face when she opened the door,” he said.

    He left the dismayed cleaner and went to his dinner. When Burchill returned, his items had been moved to a smaller room. Eventually, his company received a letter banning him from the Empress.

    Years passed and Burchill wrote a mea culpa letter to the hotel.

    “I have matured and I admit responsibility for my actions,” he wrote. “I come to you, hat-in-hand, to apologize for the damage I had indirectly come to cause and to ask you reconsider my lifetime ban from the property. I hope that you will see fit to either grant me a pardon, or consider my … years away from the Empress as ‘time served,’ ”

    Tracey Drake, the Empress’s director of public relations, said as wild as it sounds, the story is true. Drake, who heard the news Sunday, initially thought it was an April Fool’s joke but long-term staff confirmed the tale, she said. “It’s one of those things where you can’t make this stuff up.”

    Burchill visited Victoria and the Empress Hotel over the Easter weekend. Ryan Reardon, the hotel’s director of rooms, told him he is once again welcome as a guest.

    “I bet it was the pound of Brothers pepperoni that I gave them as a peace offering that did the trick,” Burchill quipped.

    kderosa@timescolonist.com

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  18. FMFDOC

    FMFDOC IBA #63181 Super Supporter

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    You sir, have won the Internet.
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  19. sagedrifter

    sagedrifter Southern Explorer

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    Keeping it simple is key for me. I'm a one pot or one skillet meal guy, but I like healthy and tasty food.

    Lately I've been eating stir-fry vegetables mostly with those organic rice pouches.

    Usually an egg burrito for breakfast with onion, peppers or whatever I have on hand. I get a few veggies as I travel, potatoes, sweet bell peppers, one onion, a cucumber etc. To keep my cooler cold I buy frozen stir fry mix, frozen fajita mixes and frozen fruit. Wheat tortilla wraps and some eggs always.

    Mix up my own seasoning blends at home and I carry olive oil and good quality soy sauce. I try to always have a bottle of valintina extra hot too.

    I've been eating out less, staying at the campsites more and relaxing. Making good coffee with my own breakfast makes for a pleasant start, gives the fog time to burn off where I like to ride. I haven't done a morning breakfast run in a long time. Rather do an occasional nice dinner at a good restaurant when touring.
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  20. Laromonster

    Laromonster Lean, mean pacifist machine

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    Prepacked small bags of couscous mixed with a powdered stock cube and various dehydrated vegetables.
    Fish if caught or canned tuna/chicken/meat.
    IMG_20180527_112424.jpg
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