What do you cook/eat when camping?

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by tafflink, Dec 3, 2007.

  1. Grinnin

    Grinnin Forever N00b Supporter

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    East or west, rivers often have a narrow end and a wide end.

    I hopped from rock to rock while wearing a backpack to get across the Hudson River. Near Lake Tear of the Clouds, the Hudson River is pretty narrow.
  2. Some_Dude

    Some_Dude Been here awhile

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    This conversation reminds me of the Jordan River.

    (That’s Israel on the west bank and Jordan on the east)

    [​IMG]
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  3. zap2504

    zap2504 Dave E.

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    Or the time I visited the historic Concord (river) bridge in MA. Or some parts of the "Big River" (Rio Grande). It's all in the perspective.
    Getting back on track, I bought a 6-pack of Udon Premium Noodle soup (Nongshim brand) from Costco that is a pretty good just-add-hot-water soup that is either good by itself or as a base for additions.
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  4. Secundius

    Secundius Adventurer

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    There use to a company that produced great "Retort" type complete meals (i.e. Vacuum Pack and easy to Reheat) called "Yurika Foods"! "Market Street" produces a fairly good tasty copy of their Reheatable food items and a 12-volt low heat food heater, MRE Heaters or sous vide will do, or even a simple cooking pan...
  5. Highway Hornet

    Highway Hornet Major Fear

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  6. Toto1

    Toto1 n00b

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    ” What do you cook/eat when camping? "

    The first couple of days I eat veggies and other items I've brought from home out of the fridge/pantry - carrots, beetroot, mushrooms, salad greens, avocado, nuts, hemp seeds, bread, peanut butter, and a can of Amy's Kitchen organic soup. As well I like to pack a can of coconut cream, some matcha, cacao powder, cayenne pepper capsules (extra hot), Himalayan rock salt, . . . And I generally have one or two 1-litre plastic bottles of water as well as the two glass ones in the outside bottle holders of my panniers. The plastic-tasting water is for cooking, the glass bottles' water I save for drinking by itself.
    I keep an eye out for a Coles or Woolworths supermarket when I'm going through a town, where I can get more of the same sort of items; they mostly have an organic section I can restock from.

    Around 4pm I usually start looking for a camping spot in the bush about 20km or so outside of the last town so I don't get bothered by hoons after the local pub closes. Sometimes I'll pay for a tent site in a caravan park if it's been a while since I've had a shower.

    I generally have just the one meal a day, at night in my tent (it's called a 3-man tent but I don’t see it happening). My mini-collapsible chair, a Helinox-1, is an essential part of this; the under-side of the tent roof just clears my head when I'm sitting inside, enabling me to lounge in comfort while dining and reading or watching a video for company.

    In warm weather I don't bother cooking but on cold nights I might chop up the veggies to add to Amy's soup with water and coconut cream, heated up on my tiny stove in my stainless steel cup from Amazon. I’ve been using the stove and the cup on camping trips for nearly six years {correction - around 4 years} and they still work like new. Thanks Jeff.

    During the day I might pull up somewhere nice and make a hot drink of either matcha or cacao powder (aka hot chocolate) with coconut cream and a dash of salt and about a third of a cayenne capsule in boiling water. To store the coconut cream I carry a couple of small glass jars (in bubble wrap, yes) with me and when I open a can I put what's left into the jars. It lasts a day or two without going off, especially in cold weather.

    Most days I’ll stop at a café and plan the next part of the trip on my iPad while sipping a long black. Caffeine for me tends to make an ordinary stretch of road enjoyable, and enjoyable riding doubly so. Not all country cafes make five-star coffee though, but I add a pinch of salt if it’s a tad bitter, as it can be when the espresso machine hasn’t been properly cleaned, and that greatly improves the flavour.
    I also have a magnesium tablet before a cup of coffee, dissolving it under my tongue while waiting to be served. This is good practice if you’re drinking more coffee on a trip than you’re used to having. Caffeine tends to deplete your body’s minerals and replenishing the Mg is thought to restore your taste buds and prevent caffeine jitters. If you decide to try this, look for an amino acid chelated formula rather than the usual magnesium sulphate or oxide. (I buy Doctor’s Best High Absorption Magnesium from iHerb.)

    Hope there’s some stuff you can use in there Tafflink
  7. 6steve

    6steve n00b

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    Tim hortons for breakfast , any grocery deli for the rest . No dragging cookware , stoves etc etc . Bike is so much lighter and honestly doesn't cost any more .
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  8. Adv Mike

    Adv Mike Off the deep end

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    The experience is worth the extra cost. Even if it’s just crap ingredients you’re throwing in a pot, after a long day of riding it tastes better than anything store bought.

    A backpacking stove and pot doesn’t weigh that much nowadays, or take up much room. My MSR fuel bottle also holds some extra fuel should I need it.
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  9. Highway Hornet

    Highway Hornet Major Fear

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    Pancakes

  10. MotoBoss

    MotoBoss Go Ahead

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    wat?.......
  11. ts3doug

    ts3doug Long timer

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    Dorf on cooking

    Screenshot_20200705-100609_YouTube.jpg
  12. Ndlulamiti

    Ndlulamiti Been here awhile

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    To me, it's about riding and backcountry camping, not gourmet dining.

    No lunch - don't like eating before I've finished riding.

    For dinner one of these
    1. Subway sandwich bought before heading into the sticks.
    2. Can of Denty Moore stew - some bread.
    3. Freeze dried backpacking food.
    Usually a few blocks of chocolate for dessert.
    Always have some scotch of bourbon on hand.

    Breakfast:
    1. Coffee- Moka or Starbucks Via
    2. Instant oats.

    Cooking stuff takes up much volume.
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  13. mouthfulloflake

    mouthfulloflake Not afraid

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    Some of us enjoy eating well, cooking AND riding.
  14. acesandeights

    acesandeights Noob

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    Yep, cooking is easy, fun and can be quick if planned well. A nice meal is like a nice scotch or bourbon, whether it's a quick bite in the morning or part of winding down at the end of a day. Why skimp when the effort is small and the benefits can be high? That is, if you know how to cook, haha.

    One pot with a lid and a grate to go over a fire; you have a pot, a pan, an oven/roaster and a grill. There isn't anything you can cook at home that you can't cook with that.
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  15. OKDQ

    OKDQ Been here awhile

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    Therein lies the problem, I don’t plan anything well! :rofl
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  16. acesandeights

    acesandeights Noob

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    touché
  17. xtphreak

    xtphreak from B4 "adventure bikes"

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    Damn!!

    I'd guess a truck stop roller dawg or two would be outta the question???
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  18. njpaddler

    njpaddler Been here awhile

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    I've been a vegetarian since 1993. I'm an excellent cook. I love to eat. A motto in my family is " don't eat to live ,live to eat !" Am I painting a picture here?

    MSR Whisperlite is 34 years old. I gave it some new rubber o-rings a few years ago, thanks Pep Boys! The cookware consists of some fairly newer stuff plus a government issue mess kit that's older than me. The folding fork and knife are from when I was a boy scout at 8 years old, 56 years ago.

    I bought a food dehydrator decades ago and a big stack of the trays. I dry a lot of things put them in food storage bags and then pick from the supply when it comes time to prep a trip. I supplement with certain products from Trader Joe's that are partly cooked and sealed in vacuum bags or the small boxes of soups that don't require refrigeration. I eat very well while camping sometimes attracting unwanted visitors of the two-legged kind.

    Oh,and the Indian market supplies me, too, with plenty of vacuum-packed flavor-packed choices that are easily heated, combined with rice, etc., and low-cost.
    I avoid the commercial dehydrated insanely overly salted stuff and control what I eat rather than take what I can find. I do occasionally eat fish so cans of Herring, mackerel, sardines, even better if I can find some fresh fish along the way are a welcomed change. Dried chunks of pineapple rehydrated make a fine dessert as do most of the fruits.

    When out for a day of cross-country skiing I'll bring the whisperlite and have hot soup for lunch to the envy of other people and their rock-hard frozen peanut butter sandwiches.

    Life is too short.
  19. MotoBoss

    MotoBoss Go Ahead

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    How do you know if someone is a vegetarian? Just wait 10 minutes and they'll tell you!









    Oh wait, is that vegans?




    :hide
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  20. boulet_boulet

    boulet_boulet Long timer

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    Actually one of the most annoying things about being a vegetarian is it being THE topic at every single meal with people outside of my own household. It’s annoying. Seriously, I don’t think I’ve been out to a single restaurant or meal with my extended family when my dietary choices don’t come up at some point.
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