What Influenced the purchase of your Motorcycle?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by TheProphet, Aug 16, 2018.

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What Influenced the Purchase of your Motorcycle?

Poll closed Sep 11, 2018.
  1. Magazine Advertisement

    0.7%
  2. Television Commercial

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. Internet Advertisement

    0.7%
  4. Personal Choice, no outside influence

    69.3%
  5. Friends Pressure; It is what everyone I know rides

    1.3%
  6. Comparison of Technical Specifications

    25.3%
  7. Top MotoGP or other Racing Brand

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  8. I liked the way it looked

    20.0%
  9. Cost, Price, Money

    22.0%
  10. Brand Name Allegiance

    10.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. PeterW

    PeterW Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    4,238
    Location:
    Gold Coast
    I wanted a lightweight touring bike, something that'd handle bad roads if not dirt on the way out and the local highways with ease on the way home. (Days in the 1000km range being in plan). Looked around for a while and in the end 2014+ DL1000 with some inexpensive mods ticked all the boxes. Waited around until one came up online with low k's at a price I was good with. A couple of emails and a phone call later and it was mine - and yeah, it works well.
    #81
  2. thechief86

    thechief86 jack of all daniels

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2015
    Oddometer:
    1,447
    Location:
    White House, TN
    You must be a real hoss if a DL1000 is lightweight for you, lol
    :eek2:D
    I guess compared to the Harleys and Aspencades and Goldwings of the world it may as well be a dirtbike. Everything is relative.
    #82
  3. Daboo

    Daboo Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2011
    Oddometer:
    518
    Location:
    Seattle
    I would've picked "Comparison of technical features" if it had been there, along with "Test Ride". It's interesting reading the comments. I have owned six bikes in the time I've been riding, and I test rode every one. It was never an option in my mind, and maybe the seller/salesman realized that.

    My latest is a BMW F800GT. It may be my last. The technical specs that were important to me were
    • Less than 1000 ccs. I didn't want an engine bigger than cars I've owned, just to go down the freeway.
    • Shaft, or belt drive. Chains were a big drawback in my mind.
    • A fairing to keep the rain and cold from hitting me directly.
    • Something suitable for long year-around daily commuting, but also suitable for long in-state and eventually out of state touring.
    The F800GT meets all those criteria.

    I took one for a test ride. BMW dealers can't sell a bike for a "demo" price without a certain number of miles on them. So I was told to ride it wherever I wanted, and for as long as I wanted. I did, and found I liked it a lot.

    I've since retired. The long daily commutes are gone, replaced by shorter commutes to church, the store, and the local prison where I volunteer in some ministries there. I still take some long 10-12 hour day trips. When I've come back from them, instead of wanting to take a nap like I always did on the previous bikes, I'll do something like mow the lawn. The F800GT is so effortless at twisties and it eats up long stretches, to the point that I have a lot of energy left over.

    Now that I'm retired, I've taken road trips that have had me going through almost all the states and Canadian provinces west of the Rockies. I've never wished for another bike on those trips.

    Chris
    #83
  4. PeterW

    PeterW Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    4,238
    Location:
    Gold Coast
    No, I'm a small guy, and I wouldn't willingly take a DL1000 down some of the dirt tracks I've taken the 650.

    Point being, the 1000 is essentially a TOURING bike for me - very focused on long days on secondary roads. I have a DL650 which I did some of those rides on before, capable, lighter but not very pleasant on the last few hours of the long hauls home. Even compared to bikes like the FJR the 1000 is very light weight and it has no unpleasant vibrations at the speeds I run. I picked the bike on the basis that I wanted to make the rides I'd done and mostly enjoyed on the 650 less unpleasant on the way home and I aced it.

    And similar to the post above, I was looking for a bike that wouldn't leave me feeling beat up at the end of the day.

    The one downside, the 1000 is a lot quicker than I expected it to be and more than capable of taking on sports bikes on the back roads but I'll concede it's quite tiring if I do that - so provided I control myself it's a very relaxing bike to take on those long rides. I'm getting better at that - really I am.
    #84
    Grouchybastard and thechief86 like this.
  5. viajero

    viajero Too old to be a nOOb

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2006
    Oddometer:
    6,619
    Location:
    Idaho
    My current bike is a 2000 Honda VFR800 (in the fastest color - yellow).

    My previous bike was a 1996 VFR 750. The enjoyment I got from putting about 75,000 miles on it was a deciding factor in the purchase of the yellow one, which now has well over 100,000 miles.
    #85
    portalespeanut and neanderthal like this.
  6. Grouchybastard

    Grouchybastard n00b

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2018
    Oddometer:
    1
    Location:
    Rural Yamhill County
    My first set of wheels was a Yamaha DT 100 back when the world was still black and white. Killed a lot of mosquitos with that bike. From both ends. Went 30 plus years without one. Moved way out of town and decided it was time to start riding again. DRZ 400 because I have miles of gravel roads I could ride to get my skills back. Rode that for a year and found that I really enjoyed the twisty paved roads we have and moved up to a Wee Strom. Been on that for a couple years and getting ready to take what I hope is my last plunge. (Ya Right). Finding it much harder to dial in on exactly what I want.
    #86
    portalespeanut likes this.
  7. portalespeanut

    portalespeanut nEARLY nORMAL

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2011
    Oddometer:
    123
    Location:
    Desert southwest
    I'll refer to the two mentioned below...

    The XR650R...why wouldn't anyone want one? Seriously, while I've owned many makes of bikes over many years, I've always had Honda dealerships nearby...and I live in the middle of nowhere...so I've had several of Hondas. While healing from one of my many dirt bikes accidents, I began to re-think the whole dual-sport thing. I'd always believed that a DS bike was a 'waste of time'...not a real dirt bike, and not very good on the pavement either, compared to road bikes. They were 'not very good at anything'...just under achieving porkers that would hurt you on the trails, and get run over on the streets (Not necessarily true, by the way). I couple of dawgs I'd owned in my past convinced me of that. As I pondered the possibilities, I passed on a KLR (see above), and I found a pristine BRP that was plated since new, and thought it'd be perfect for me as an aging, crippled dirt-biker. I'd always wanted one every since they made history in Baja. Years later, it's still my 'do it all bike' if I could have only one. I thought about buying 2, so that when I wore one out, I'd have another since they're 'obsolete'...but now I'm quite sure I'll never wear mine out. In fact, it appears that it will 'wear me out' in the end.

    The Triumph Tiger 800XC...where I live there's just so many unimproved roads, and I was having the urge to get off my '09 Concourse and find an 'all-road' bike. At that time, the Super Tenere was on the showroom floor, the Africa Twin was just a frustrating rumor, but my Honda/Yamaha dealership had taken on the Triumph line. I rode a Super Tenere...nice, but seemed to have no personality...or maybe our personalities just clashed. I rode the Tiger and just loved the motor...and thought, what a unique bike. Shortly after that, Triumph ran a 'special', where they threw in the large windshield, heated grips, and luggage for no charge to anyone buying the 800...that did it for me, as it was over a thousand dollars of 'freebies'. Since then, I have really enjoyed the bike...the one bummer is that my local dealer later dropped the Triumph line, saying the corporate rules makers were impossible to deal with (and that's from someone who has to deal with Honda corporate). Now it's 200 miles each way if I ever need a Triumph dealer...plus, the Africa Twins are here for the 'pickin'. I do all my own maintenance, and barring some software glitch, I hope to never need a Triumph dealer...still, I think about the possibilities of replacing the Tiger all the time. It's a character flaw...
    #87
    Billy52 likes this.
  8. Addapost

    Addapost Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2016
    Oddometer:
    317
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    I bought my bike specifically for the TAT next summer. I had a list of specific criteria I wanted: cheap, reliable, long service intervals, small motor (250), and not tall. Honda crf 250 L fit it all so I bought it.
    #88
    portalespeanut likes this.
  9. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2014
    Oddometer:
    719
    When you live/ride at 10Kft ASL it's all about the power to weight ratio.
    Everything feels slow at this altitude. :becca

    At least the riding is fvcking epic.
    #89
  10. Jarlaxle

    Jarlaxle Bregan D'Aerthe

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2014
    Oddometer:
    12,088
    Location:
    New England
    I wanted a standard that was suitable for touring. I also wanted something that did NOT need lots of service. (Which immediately eliminated all chain-drive bikes.) Something that had plenty of places able to service it. Also on the list was decent fuel range (~200 miles), storage, and the ability to easily add the needed farkles (highway pegs, windscreen, luggage rack) to make it a long-distance highway runner. Those specs boiled down to "V-twin cruiser", and the minimal service and abundant accessories boiled down to "Harley Davidson". Not wanting forward controls, also not wanting an 800+lb bike, and not liking the sometimes-troubled Twin Cam engine, that meant Sportster.

    I did plenty of shopping, and found a 1200T...the right bike for THAT GUY, the dude touring on a Sporty.
    #90
    prima19rider likes this.
  11. sleazy rider

    sleazy rider przemądrzały dupek

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,834
    Location:
    SE Michigan
    Comfort, unrefueled range and accessibility of accessories to make it mine were the needs. Over the years, I've lusted after the Honda ST1300 as a sport-TOURER and long distance ride. One popped up on ST.owners for under $2000 with under 100k miles on it and it started another fly and ride adventure. It's been modified with a custom Corbin seat, a couple sets of LED driving and fog lamps, a better windscreen and is currently getting a 4 gallon auxiliary fuel tank added in place of the top box. To guide me on these adventures, it has a Zumo 590 GPS on the right handlebar and an older Street Pilot 2720 on a dash shelf.

    When purchased, it ended up as a two day ride home because the stock seat sucked mightily! :lol3 It's had three aftermarket seats installed since and I've settled on the Corbin Canyon Close as the winnah. Also tried were a used standard Corbin front seat, the Spencerized one it came with and a used Russell Day Long.

    IMG_0128.jpg

    IMG_0129.jpg

    I've tried a few different lighting options also and am thoroughly happy with an inexpensive set of eBay Chineseum 10 watt fogs on the lower fork legs and a set of Hella four LED spots on new factory police mounts over the mirrors. Headlights have been upgraded with LED hi/lo bulbs too. They all work to turn night into day at a very reasonable price point.

    IMG_0272.jpg

    The stock windscreen had been modified to use some upper corner mounted mirrors and they left a large glue scar on each side of the 'screen. I grabbed a Cal Sci tinted screen and it seems to work well in all weather conditions.
    #91
  12. drrod1

    drrod1 Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,195
    Location:
    Calgary
    I bought my Blackbird simply because of the way it looks. It will still look good 50 years from now. Pic is not of my bike but it is identical. Everything else about it is a bonus.

    upload_2018-11-14_22-42-39.png
    #92
  13. hooligan998

    hooligan998 Save a life, grope your wife.

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2018
    Oddometer:
    100
    Location:
    Chester, VA
    None of the poll choices really fit my scenario. Years ago I had a deposit on a Liquid Silver 2004 Yamaha R1. I made the down payment well in advance of release as the dealer was only going to get three of them. Well, the chance came up to move into a bigger house with an attached garage. My family needed it and I had no garage at the time, so I used some of the money I had set aside for the R1 so we could buy the house. I would just put the money back before the first one came in. Well first one came, and I didn't have the money back in the account yet, so I passed it along to the next guy and would get the second one. Same deal on the second one. Well the third one came. And went. Of course I was bummed out big time. So I went down and talked with the salesman. I had enough money for a left over silver 03 Yamaha FZ1. Not my first bike of choice, but when he rolled it out into the sun, I thought maybe this wouldn't be so bad. Thus began my love affair with my trusty 03 FZ1.

    FWIW, I did end up owning a 2007 R1. That thing was an absolute beast to ride!
    #93
  14. portalespeanut

    portalespeanut nEARLY nORMAL

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2011
    Oddometer:
    123
    Location:
    Desert southwest
    I had a 1200 Sportster and loved it for the all reasons You mentioned. The worst part was when I rode with a group of other HD owners once and was told to 'ride in the back of the line, and next time, don't bring my 'wifes bike'... :rofl
    #94
  15. slobinski

    slobinski easily amused

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2006
    Oddometer:
    672
    Location:
    Powell Butte, Oregon
    I'll go with brand loyalty (mostly) and personal choice. Had a Honda SL 125 and a Triumph Tiger TR6C waaay back in the day when I'd just moved out and lived on my own at age 19. Many moons later, I've been through several brands, usually one street bike and one dual-sport at a time. Current rides are a new Bonneville T120 (my fourth Triumph) and a used DRZ, which just followed me home a week ago. The pattern continues. Closing in on my mid-60's these two may be my last bikes, and I've enjoyed every one of them along the way.
    #95
    portalespeanut likes this.
  16. Andyvh1959

    Andyvh1959 Cheesehead Klompen Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    3,375
    Location:
    Da frozen tundra eh? 1.5 mile west of Lambeau
    Personal choice and brand loyalty. I've ridden BMW flat twins since 89, and still own three of them; 76 R100RS, 94 R1100RS and a 07 R1200RT. I like the versatility and durability, and easy maintenance of the BMW twins as I do all my own work on them. I've always like the overall capability of the R1100RS, backroads, twisties, touring, commuting, did it all well. My R1200RT is similar and more, to me it feels light and nimble, MUCH different feel than my 03 Vulcan VN1600
    #96
  17. JETalmage

    JETalmage Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2014
    Oddometer:
    720
    Honda Montesa 4RT 300RR Cota
    KTM 500 EXC-F
    KTM 990 SMT

    Three bikes; one reason: Purpose-built excellence.

    JET
    #97
  18. goD giB

    goD giB Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2016
    Oddometer:
    322
    The only common denominator in the 9 bikes I have bought, I wanted to ride them more than I wanted the money in my pocket.
    Sometimes more than I wanted money I hadn't earned yet.
    #98
    Vertical C likes this.
  19. Oilhed

    Oilhed MarkF Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2003
    Oddometer:
    12,229
    Location:
    Connecticut
    My last four bike purchases fall into that “I always wanted one” zone. So when the opportunity came I jumped.

    If I had really evaluated the purchase before hand two might have been something else. But then I still woulda always wanted one.
    #99
  20. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Love those blue pipes Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2003
    Oddometer:
    10,348
    Location:
    Southern Louisiana or Southern England or ...
    I'd say magazine test reports influenced my decision to buy a KTM 1290SA but NOT magazine adverts (or ads anywhere else.) After that, it was a lot of internet research, followed by a few test rides.

    Other bikes I have bought based on their reputation (weestrom) or simply because they were a good deal, in the right place at the right time. I initially didn't want my R1100GS but it was too good of a deal to pass up.