What is a good, obtainable daily mileage goal for a trip of a week +

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by crowtalks, Oct 20, 2020.

  1. crowtalks

    crowtalks escaping life, one ride at a time Supporter

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    I used to ride and camp for two weeks at a time, but I have done almost no traveling in the last ten years or so, due to increase of work responsibilities. I retired in March and looking back on my younger self, my riding partner and I used to burn the roads up, camp, get up early run all day, camp, etc and by the time I got home I would be absolutely worn out.

    Now, fifteen to twenty years older I am planning to travel solo on two lanes, camp and also visit historical and archaeological sites. I watch some videos (Itchy Boots for one) about travel and I realized Noraly averages maybe 150 to 200 miles a day, and she doesn't ride every day...that is relaxed...maybe a little too relaxed just for a week or so...
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  2. Vistavette

    Vistavette Been here awhile

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    For me, that really depends on how demanding the type of riding is. A days worth of super slab is significantly different than an entire day through tight technical curves. Are there lots of stops? Or is it a get somewhere day? On average, I ride about 300 miles in a day. On more technical days, it may be a lot less. Really, in my opinion, there is no "right answer"
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  3. crowtalks

    crowtalks escaping life, one ride at a time Supporter

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    I abhor super slab...there will be stops to enjoy the history, etc of the area. Some trips will be to pick a Federal Highway and ride it from beginning to terminus (example, I picked up US 70 in Los Cruxes (the farthest west I could find where it still exists) and rode it east to NC...some trips will be to check off states on my map...I used to ride I-40 to get "out west" and we would cover 700 to 800 miles a day, and then on the two lanes, we would still average 500 to 600 miles a day...that is way too much, especially now. I am wanting input from current wanderers (like you) to get a planning idea...
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  4. Glenn247

    Glenn247 Long timer Supporter

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    I often ride back roads avoiding interstate and highways at all costs.

    For example, I rode all back roads between Virginia and Michigan earlier this year and I seemed to hit my comfort wall at around 300-400 miles.

    I will never commit to riding more than 400 miles per day on future trips...

    400 miles at around 45-55 mph with frequent stops seems to burn up most of my daylight.

    Good luck with your adventures on two wheels...
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  5. Yinzer Moto

    Yinzer Moto Sloppy 300 rider Supporter

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    Everyone is a bit different and every trip is a bit different. On more asphalt oriented trips, 6-900/ days don’t leave much time for getting off the bike. On BDR or TAT dirt road type trips, 4-500 mile days are full days of riding. The more you stop and explore, the more it will slow down. You probably need to get out for a couple overnight trips and see what is a good pace for you.
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  6. crowtalks

    crowtalks escaping life, one ride at a time Supporter

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    Yeah, I actually did a camping trip a couple of months ago and I have been averaging 300 to 400 mile loops about once a week to get my old bones used to day-long riding again. 80 - 90% of my riding will be on tarmac. Now that I am going solo, I want to really enjoy and experience the flavor and essence of back-road, small town America in areas I haven't traveled...primarily the North Central and North East
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  7. jonz

    jonz Miles are my mantra Supporter

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    Sounds to me like you'll spend half the riding day on the bike and half off. So 3 hours +/- of riding. On back roads going through small towns, that sounds like 150 miles per day. Throw in the occasional 300-400 mile day to bridge an area of less interest which you have practiced riding and know how you'll feel.
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  8. Vistavette

    Vistavette Been here awhile

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    It also really depends where you live and where you're going. I live in Las Vegas, so to get anywhere I pretty much have to take a freeway and then I can get on the back roads when I get somewhere that's worth seeing. For me, trying to do back roads in the desert is not only excruciatingly boring, but you're usually so rural there's no where you're going to be able to stop for gas. I often envy you guys who live in much more picturesque areas. Especially those of you who just seem to have a never-ending supply of amazing backroads
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  9. crowtalks

    crowtalks escaping life, one ride at a time Supporter

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    I am blessed to live in the southeastern US...I am pretty familiar with your neck of the woods and I understand your dilemma...
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  10. Turtletownman

    Turtletownman Been here awhile

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    From your location and being retired, there is little reason for 1000 mile days. I now find about 400 miles gets me to any location I want to visit either from the Tennessee house or the Georgia coast. I, at times like to look at things-scenic vistas, historic sites-or participate in events. Having no scheduled agenda means being able to enjoy unexpected opportunities.

    For me, an idea of places to visit and roads to ride with possible campsites picked out written down on a route sheet (yeah I am a Ludite) but with flexibility to change any and all plans provides the best possible trips.

    Remember you are only a short distance from world class motorcycle roads across four states.

    Bob
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  11. PhotoAl

    PhotoAl Been here awhile

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    Didn't intend to write a book just turned out that way!

    Congratulations on your retirement. I retired three years ago, 2 1/2 years ago I took the grandkids to a local motorcycle shop and saw a used BMW they had marked down. Deep soul searching and thought for a week and traded my Kawasaki ZX6R 636 for aa BMW F800GT. That was a gigantic change! Wahoo got the bike now lets fo somewhere. Left a couple of months later and rode to Yellowstone and back, primarily stayed at KOAs sometimes in a cabin (it it was hot) and sometimes in a tent. I didn't do any cooking which made packing easier. Since then I have done 4 more long trips of 14 to 17 days. Being in Birmingham the toughest part is getting out of the south. First two days are hard but fun cause I'm off on an adventure! 1st day is 575 miles to Springfield MO and second 500 miles to Grand Island NE. From there either go west to Cheyanne or north to South Dakota. I avoid interstates wherever possible but some routes like Grand Island to Cheyanne are a lot of interstate. In June coming back from Ft Collins CO to Grand Island I rode due east from Fort Collins and only picked up I80 just before Grand Island. Saw a lot of small towns and nice friendly folks. Typically I have a destination in mind and will push a little to get in that area and then back off the distance. In my June trip first 4 days were 575, 500, 353 and 150. At that point I was in Hot Springs SD in the Black Hills and took a day off for sightseeing - still rode. After that the longest day I had until I started back was from Moab UT to Rock Springs WY - 326 miles. Only one problem - it rained! All day it rained! Temperature down to 34.7F and rain! I did not carefully check the weather forecast. LOL my heated jacket liner was in the bottom of my waterproof duffel bag. Why? It was 99F the day before in Moab! Started in full gear but wearing pants and two T-shirts under the gear. Stopped and traded summer gloves for winter gloves and put on a fleece jacket. Rain jacket was a thin WalMart FroggTogg jacket. My middle got wet pants were damp I was shivering but I made it without too much trouble, just kept on plodding along and riding safely. I had a test site reserved in Rock Springs but when I arrived asked if cabins had heaters so upgraded to a cabin and dried my gear and washed clothes - dinner was a coke and a pack of crackers! But I'll always remember it as a special time, me and my bike humming down the rainy road on an adventure! Was going to Duboise WY from Rock Springs but canceled and went to Fort Collins CO instead. Always watch the weather especially in the western states. The morning I was supposed to be in Dubois it was 29 with snow on the ground. FroggToggs make great rain jackets (I did buy a better one for the last trip), they pack small and work well but don't last long. They are my easy to reach rain suit for when I'm riding. They also block cold which is nice when I'm wearing my mesh jacket.

    For electronics I take iPhone, iPad, GoPro, InReach mini, SPOT, and maybe a small computer. For navigation I have a Garmin Zumo XT which is nice but haven't used much. I recommend having one or two USB outlets on the bike and hard wiring the GPS to a switched circuit. Depending on the bike handlebars can have lots of vibrations. My BMW F800GT was particularly bad. USB outlets would not survive and I messed up the autofocus on my iPhone 10S mounting them on the bars. Current bike is a Tracer GT and much less vibrations, currently going thru and setting it up. Not necessary to have a lot of outlets but they make things nicer. Traded bikes in Sioux Falls SD in September (an interesting story all by itself) but wound up using the Tracer GTs outlet with an AutoZone adapter to power the Zumo XT and charged everything else at night. Currently looking at a Neutrino Element to control stuff like USB ports, aux lights, extra brake lights and control heated gear. I like having aux lights on the front and extra brake/tail lights for added visibility. Do not plan to ride during the dusk hours or at night due to wildlife but if I go to dinner or get caught out the extra lights are nice.

    Don't need a lot of gear, I use sidecases plus a waterproof duffle (Amazon) on the rear seat plus a tank bag. I also look at routes to make sure they have gas stops within range. The BMW's range was 142 to 180 miles depending on speed. I would generally look for gas at the 100 to 120 mile point but then look ahead to see if there was gas further down the road in case a stain was closed. A couple of times Ive had to put 87 in because that was all that was available.
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  12. crowtalks

    crowtalks escaping life, one ride at a time Supporter

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    Thanks for the story and info. I traveled out west camping from middle TN for 13 -14 years starting 1991, first on a R60/6 (2 years), then a goldwing (1 year), then a K100RS (6 years) and R1100GS, which I still ride (as well as the R60). Then work seriously got in the way and I went ten years without a major trip (went on a few three to four day outings).

    I tended to do the same as you in leaving TN...hoof it down the road until I get out of the uber familiar riding areas, then start taking two lanes. I probably won't go back out west, at least not until I cover states I haven't ridden to...primarily North East and also WI and MN (and don't forget, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, Labrador, etc). I have ridden through some very nasty rains for days on end, as I tended to start out the first week of Sept (hurricane season)...I found out pretty quickly that state parks with lakes in Texas have large covered picnic shelters that a bike and a tent will fit into nicely, when you move the tables about.

    The worst rain was from Hondo, NM east toward Roswell, where it was raining so hard, I could barely see the tail lights of the semi ahead of me. 3 or 4 miles from Roswell the rain stopped and I pulled into a gas station to dry my face and helmet off and a startled woman pulled in behind me saying that was the most amazing thing she had ever seen, and how she couldn't believe I made it because she could barely see me!

    I use a single burner camp stove and a US canteen cup as the basic cookery tools, dome tent, air mattress, bag, etc. I have USB and use a TomTom and the GS has PIAA aux...I will check out FroggTogg...
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  13. ADV Wanderer

    ADV Wanderer Been here awhile

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    I'm also an "avoid the interstates as much as possible" rider.
    I actually don't plan mileage. For me its more about time in the saddle, which I aim for about 5-6 hours/day on extended trips. That allows for breaks, detours, smelling the roses, chatting with the random people at the gas pumps, etc. I'm also mostly camping.
    With modern electronics (Google Maps) I just look for a suitable campground about 5 hours "driving time" in the general direction/route I'm on, and there's my destination for that day.
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  14. Glenn247

    Glenn247 Long timer Supporter

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    Not to turn this thread into a dialogue on stealth camping, because there is already a thread on this forum for this very practice, but the tactic allows for extreme flexibility when combined with campgrounds and motels, etc.

    Riding back roads often leads to wanting to end that day's journey in a random area without an ideal campground or motel around...stealth camping allows you to get some sleep almost anywhere along your route, whether it be at a church, school, field, farm, business, etc. (assuming they are sufficiently desolate of course). Simply a consideration...
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  15. EvilClown

    EvilClown Standing by to standby for a possible disregard Super Moderator

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    Absolutely!

    Make sure you camp at Meat Cove when you get to Nova Scotia and definitely go to Newfoundland! Give yourself plenty of time.

    As you work out what works for you miles/day this might be a concept worth considering: The Mobius Trip

    Enables someone without a huge block of time all at once to make those epic journeys without all the slab time that might otherwise be necessary.

    Two things that jumped out at me were "I retired" which instantly got me to "I don't understand the question." The j.o.b. is typically what gets most of us into a short window and a deadline to return. (Congratulations on your retirement!)

    But the last part of that statement - "...I got home I would be absolutely worn out".

    Travel isn't for the weak but there should be something revitalizing about it, imo. The style riding you described just doesn't seem like it would be...but we all have our preferences and motivations.

    One way to find your happy place might be ride 'out' for half the time you are allotting yourself. Make your stops, see your sites, take your time finding your pace then halfway through work your way back doing more of the same. It'll come to you what you like.

    Following the concept of the Mobius Trip I've had days as short as 0-75 miles and as long as 4-500 (not my longest ever - just since starting the Mobius concept). It's nice to just stop and check things out along the way that might grab your interest, rarely making any reservations along the way. Down days aren't a bad thing either if you find a spot you want to check out further or just need a day off the bike.

    It's the journey.
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  16. crowtalks

    crowtalks escaping life, one ride at a time Supporter

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    LOL...Oh, I have definitely done that in the past...camped out on the side of the interstate (up a bank), in the grassy triangle of an exchange/off ramp (didn't know that was what it was until daylight) someone's front yard (ditto), farmer's field where I was able to bath in the stock tank, etc...
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  17. crowtalks

    crowtalks escaping life, one ride at a time Supporter

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    Thanks for the very informative reply!

    Could you give me the nickle definition of the "mobius trip", I have not heard the term before...

    my retirement didn't mean that I suddenly didn't have anything to do, (I have a farm) but it allows me to be very flexible with my time. My riding buddy gave up the bike travel and even though we took a rental van on a 5000+ mile trip through the Northwest US, I realized two old independent coots traveling captive in a car was not the way to go! (never again). I'm figuring I will get great ideas from several to form a basis to work from...and I am receiving great ideas...
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  18. yokesman

    yokesman Long timer

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    My wife and I just did our first van n ride trip. To the moab area for 2 weeks.
    We have all the bike camping equiptment but due to adjustments needed to be able to make trips , bought a van and put in a sleeping deck, a HF trailer to put the bike on it.
    With that we do our slabbing between destinations and ride a smaller(ktm 390 adv) around the scenic areas.
    Besides not having to break camp each move , it is more like making the bed and putting the dishes away at most.
    a 15 x 20 foot tarp covers us when shade is not available and a winch to pull the bike on is carried in case of a lack of a good loading point.
    by the way, 3 inch air matteresses allow me to situp and I sleep better than at home. a few blocks to level out the deck makes for a good, long sleep.
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  19. crowtalks

    crowtalks escaping life, one ride at a time Supporter

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    I wish my wife liked riding, but she doesn't...she abhors "wandering aimlessly" and she would be happy to be placed in a coma and revived when we arrive at the destination. For her, the vacation is the destination (that's OK) but I love exploring and traveling...I usually chose a destination before I leave on a trip and sometimes I even make there...
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  20. Amphib

    Amphib A mind is like a parachute....

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    Ive done many kinds of trips over the years. My last trip which was 14 days, I averaged 250 miles a day. This included a BDR and lots of stopping and wandering. For my style of travel, off the beaten path, I'm happiest in this range. I'm on the bike early, and generally prefer setting up camp around 5pm. I had some longer faster days and some slower days smelling the roses. I was fortunate that the "trip" started basically from home, I didn't have to get anywhere, but when slabbing it to get somewhere, I'll usually keep it to around 600 miles. My hammer down big milage days are behind me.
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