What is the best glue for leather/leather?

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Lone Rider, Nov 7, 2006.

  1. Lone Rider

    Lone Rider Registered User

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    Anybody know...experiences?
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  2. Stromdog

    Stromdog Howl at the Moon

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    Gorilla Glue.
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  3. Lone Rider

    Lone Rider Registered User

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    That was my guess.
    I bought some (well, VR did) and it doesn't list leather or any textiles, and their website says it will ruin clothing.
    What's their definition of 'ruin'?
    I don't give a toot about discoloring, but disolving might be a tad different. :D
    #3
  4. hgulledge

    hgulledge Adventurer-of-sorts Supporter

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    Ask a shoemaker. They use rubber cement, I think. Just apply to both surfaces and let it dry. Be sure to line them up when you put them together. You can't adjust them later.
    #4
  5. xtphreak

    xtphreak from B4 "adventure bikes"

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    barge cement

    used to glue soles back on ..."

    "...The Original Barge Cement; Cobbler's 1st choice for gluing rubber and leather. Used in the motion picture industry by grips and set decoraters.

    All Purpose Cement for rubber, wood, leather, glass, cork, metal, plastic, plaster, paper, concrete, etc..."


    [​IMG]

    I used Freesole

    [​IMG]
    to glue the sole on my Oxtar Matrix boot back on about 4-5 months ago ... still holding good


    "... FreesoleĀ® Urethane Formula Shoe Repair<!-- #EndEditable --> <!-- #BeginEditable "Description" -->Urethane Formula Shoe Repair is a patented urethane rubber repair system designed to restore and rebuild all types of footwear. Unaffected by heat or solvents, FREESOLE cures to a flexible thermoset rubber product providing superior adhesion, wear resistance, flexibility and waterproofing. The highly concentrated formula has minimal shrinkage: thick repairs can be made with only one permanent application. Ideal for worn heels, toes, sole and ski delaminations and more. FREESOLE will not separate with repeated flexing. ..."


    used both
    both work
    not affiliated with either
    #5
  6. Lone Rider

    Lone Rider Registered User

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    Thanks, guy!
    Good suggestions.
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  7. rick danger

    rick danger The further adventures of

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    If you go with the gorilla glue I think they say to wet the surfaces some. Is it something you can rivet?
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  8. Renazco

    Renazco Formerly AKA Boejangles

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    Tell me what it is your trying to do maybe I can help.
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  9. Waco

    Waco Renegade Sickle Hound

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    Are you depending on glue to keep a layer of leather between you and high speed pavement?
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  10. luckyduck

    luckyduck Lost

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    Barge cement is the absolute best to use. I am a shoe maker and that is what I use if it is not going to be stitched as well. It is common to make a shoe by gluing the leather around to the sole with no stitching or mechanical means of holding the top to the bottom using barge.

    Hints to happy gluing:

    1. Have plenty of ventilation. The toluene in barge will knock you out.

    2. Overlap the 2 pieces by at least 1/2 inch for enough surface area to bond well.

    3. Wet both pieces with the glue. Put on 2 coats if you don't use contact cement regularly. Let it dry until you can touch it and it isn't sticky.

    4. Press it together (if you just set them together, you can get them back apart) and pound the shit out of it. The pounding together really makes it stick.

    Good luck. I use Barge by the gallon and it really sticks.


    Paul
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  11. Lone Rider

    Lone Rider Registered User

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    The sitching gave way on the inside half of the heel on one of my Contour Plus boots. There's the boot leather itself and then the outer cap that covers this, like an elongated 1/2 moon. It's here, not on the heel. The boot has an inner lining that I don't want to compromise with a local cobbler shop..
    I can send it off and maybe have it covered and fixed under some kinda BMW warranty, but I don't want the aggravation and wait.
    1 year of use.
    #11
  12. Lone Rider

    Lone Rider Registered User

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    Good stuff, Paul, thanks a bunch.
    I figure I'm gonna have one good shot at it.
    #12
  13. xtphreak

    xtphreak from B4 "adventure bikes"

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    on my Oxtar Matrix (GoreTex liner) the molded sole was pulling off at the toe

    I cleaned it with alcohol and filled the void with Freesole (my Barge Cement was like a rock) pressed it together and secured with duct tape

    the package says it cures faster in a humid environment, so I stuck it in a trash can with a damp towel over the top.

    next day it was set and it shows no signs of letting go

    ureathane is tough stuff

    also Dow Corning 5200 is what I caulked boats with below the waterline, 4200 above

    4200 isn't as strong, but it lasts a few years in salt water and is a little more flexible than 5200
    #13
  14. Lone Rider

    Lone Rider Registered User

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    I'll try something similar tomorrow.
    I don't want to pry the layers too far apart, but do want to clean/prep them. Alcohol is a good idea and q-tips are cheap.....

    I'll probably do duct tape too because I ain't gonna stand still in the boot for 'x' hours. :D

    As the guy at the gathering said to the young stoopid fcker, before he found the lady wearing stockings....urethane. :D
    #14
  15. Mully

    Mully Kineticist

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    I've had really good results with "Shoe Goo". Fixed my BMW Gore-tex boot seams, and otherwise I'd have had to throw them away.

    mully
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  16. Renazco

    Renazco Formerly AKA Boejangles

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    Lucky Duck gave good advice on this, the Barge has always worked the best for me as well. If you do have a void you can fill it with a piece leather/suede shoestring.
    Let us know how it works out for you.
    #16
  17. BigDogAdventures

    BigDogAdventures Fart Letter

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    I second the Shoe Goo---------and it's flexible when done.
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