What you're Missing: a Guide to Side Trips off the Cassiar

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Crooked Creek, Aug 4, 2011.

  1. leftystrat62

    leftystrat62 Adventurer

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    That's very interesting about the bear bag situation;I've actually thought the same thing,but figured if I "read it somewhere to string it up,then it must be right":lol3
    Would you recommend leaving what ever food stuff in a stuff sack outside of your saddle bags so they don't get destroyed-allowing the bear to take what he wants and leave,or do you keep it stowed in your bags and hope for the best?
    I keep everything in zip lock bags,but I'm sure they can still smell it. Thanks for your input.
  2. leftystrat62

    leftystrat62 Adventurer

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    I'd agree that it was torched. Note the lack of black smoke stain on the grey painted frame work,and how the timbers were burnt on each end and in the middle,but no where else. It looks like they used an accelerant and torched it-bummer:cry
  3. Crooked Creek

    Crooked Creek Been here awhile

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    Haha, excellent. Now I just need an aircraft.

    If you're on a real expedition, where it would be bad to lose all your food, then it will take longer for a bear to get your food if it is in a skinny tree, especially if you have one of those bear resistant sacks. Just put it a ways away from your tent. This also is a good idea if you're using the same camp for a couple days and are leaving food there when you're not around.

    If I'm alone, I don't tend to bring much food at all, and if I do, it's all sealed (like Sidekicks/granola bars etc.) So, honestly, I keep it in my tent with all my gear to keep it handy and dry (since I don't have have fancy panniers or anything) I wouldn't recommend it you doing that though, even just for the psychology of it. For myself, I don't really mind a nosy bear sniffing around the tent, because then a boot to the nose or yell will likely scare him bad enough that he probably won't come back. I'll usually put my (washed) cook pot outside by the fire pit, because that'll be the first thing a bear will check out and if you put it on rocks, then it serves as an early warning system, and will scared most bears when it clangs.

    But to answer your question, it's so very unlikely that 1) a bear will come into your camp 2) it will sniff out food though a sealed bag and 3) be bold enough to try and break into your pannier on your bike . So if you usually leave the panniers on the bike overnight (I don't, because mine aren't waterproof and I just grab them to bring all my stuff into the tent) then I would just leave them there. A bonus of this is that a bear will probably knock over your bike before destroying your bags and that should either wake you up or scare him off.
  4. leftystrat62

    leftystrat62 Adventurer

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    Thanks CC for your continued bear advice-it truly has been VERY helpful.
    You mentioned:
    "I keep it in my tent with all my gear to keep it handy and dry (since I don't have have fancy panniers or anything) I wouldn't recommend it you doing that though, even just for the psychology of it. For myself, I don't really mind a nosy bear sniffing around the tent, because then a boot to the nose or yell will likely scare him bad enough that he probably won't come back."

    I've got to say I really hoped I'd be lucky enough to NOT hear a bear outside my tent sniffing around,but from the sounds of it,it probably will happen-won't it? What should one do from inside the tent-yell or punch the thing in the nose like you did, or wimper like a little girl like I might do:lol3
    Seriously,one way to help keep ones fear in check is to have some knowledge,and a plan,so I'm interested in what you have to say.

    I'm also interested in some info of weather,temps,and bugs. I figure Jun,Jul & Aug. are the best riding months,but what's some of the pro's and con's of each month? My guess is June can be very cool,and probably has high water crossings; how about the bugs-any particular month you prefer? I can really only take off the month of June,but would still like to hear what you think. Thanks
  5. Lornce

    Lornce Lost In Place

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    If you're trip is boring, put some smoked salmon and blue cheese under your pillow before going to sleep. The smell will inspire colourful dreams.


    :augie
    squonker likes this.
  6. leftystrat62

    leftystrat62 Adventurer

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    You wound me deeply
  7. GISdood

    GISdood Been here awhile

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    And to do their 'business'. That "does a bear **** in the woods?" nonsense is misguided. Based on the piles of bear scat I've seen everywhere, I'm pretty sure at least 2/3 of the black bears up here prefer to take a dump on the forestry roads. :rofl
  8. Lornce

    Lornce Lost In Place

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    And under the fruit trees in the fall.

    :deal
  9. Crooked Creek

    Crooked Creek Been here awhile

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    You probably never will have a bear come sniffing around you tent. I've only had it happen once (that I know of anyways) in all of my camping. I was just a kid and I hadn't taken any bear precautions at all. My face was probably smeared in bacon grease... It was at a campsite full of people, and it was a "garbage bear" that was acclimatized to people and used to scavenging campsites for food.

    But if you do, screaming like a girl will do just fine. I don't suggest whimpering though, because you'll sound a wounded rabbit or something :D.

    They best time of year to go is the time you can go. So June it is.

    Seriously though, weather is always a crap shoot, especially in the mountains. You could can get snow at any time of the year, especially in the higher elevations. Last year when we canoed the Spatsizi/Stikine at the end of August, the water was higher than it had been all year. There also was only one really nice day in the Spatsizi all summer (according to the outfitter we met.) That was extremely unusual, but this is not California; the weather is always unpredictable.

    I have never had an issue with bugs (July-August) because I like to camp in the mountains, and it usually gets cold enough at night to shut the bugs down. Finding somewhere with a breeze helps. Again, I think rivers are the best places to camp. Less bugs. More fish. Free dishwasher and laundry mat. It's the way to go.

    Just be prepared with rain gear, real (28.5-100%) DEET bug spray, and a head net, and you will be good to go. If you have a month you will get some bad and some good weather, guaranteed. I usually only can get a week off, so I always have 3 or 4 possible trips in mind, and then pick the one that seems best at the last minute.
  10. Crooked Creek

    Crooked Creek Been here awhile

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    Haha, I forgot about that. That's actually a real danger on twisty remote roads (and way more likely than hitting a bear and especially being attacked.) Turd traps I call them. Just like a Mario Kart banana; they can be very slippery when fresh, depending on what the bears been eating. I haven't had much of a problem with knobbies, but with street tires, it could be an issue.
  11. Crooked Creek

    Crooked Creek Been here awhile

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    First test of the new packraft.

    <iframe src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/9r8hJpgSMGo?rel=0" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="480" width="640"></iframe>
  12. riverman

    riverman Life is great !

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    Hey buddy. That confirms it. You are definitely crazy enough to join us on one of our Labrador canoe expeditions. I think you also just sold me on a dry suit. I figured you were one of us when I saw your portage route in the earlier vid but now am convinced.

    Naskaupi River - 2013??
  13. BigDogAdventures

    BigDogAdventures Fart Letter Supporter

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    OK--your makin' me a nervous wreck.
    Survivor man ain't got nothin' on you :eek1:huh:huh
    Think I'll throw another log on the fire to warm up.
    BigDog
  14. Gale B.T.

    Gale B.T. Long timer

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    WAY TO GO BEN, and I would venture to say you really got Balls but I am sure if you have anything there , it will be drawn way up inside your belly where things are warm!:lol3

    Never get dull with you, keep us smiling,
    gale
  15. Crooked Creek

    Crooked Creek Been here awhile

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    Who knows...I've always wanted to go to Labrador.

    Haha, it wasn't that bad. It was a little chilly when I forgot to put my gloves on the first time I jumped in, but I spent probably a 1/2 an hour swimming in total and it was no problem other than being a little cold on the face and ears when I put my head under.
  16. Sunday Rider

    Sunday Rider Adventurer Wanabe

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    Man you are living the life. Can't believe you did that, figured you were just going to test that bag of air, instead you jumped in. Whoa. Thanks for posting that up. Amazing. Wish I could see the look on the guy fishing when he saw you jump in.:lol3
  17. Lornce

    Lornce Lost In Place

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    Before we all try this at home, tell us you were wearing a dry suit?
    :ear
  18. Gale B.T.

    Gale B.T. Long timer

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    I am in total agreement Lornce, I did a recovery dive in October in Kinbasket Lake, Valemount ,BC for a little logging bull boat. I had only a WET SUIT:wink: and to say I got cold is a joke. I ,once out of the water and on the float deck tried to drink a cup of hot coffee, needless to say I could not keep any of that hot coffee in the cup, my shivers must have been fun to watch.

    I also was hoping Ben was using a dry suit or he was part polar bear., He just may be!!!!! :lol3
  19. Crooked Creek

    Crooked Creek Been here awhile

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    Sorry, I thought between riverman's comment ("I think you also just sold me on a dry suit.") and the video it was apparent that I was also testing my new drysuit. Wanted to make sure it doesn't leak before trusting my life to it in the boonies.

    That said, I have swum in that aeration hole in March in just my swim trunks. But not for as long. I think it's good to figure out how your body responds to hypothermia in a safer situation, so you can deal with it better when you need to.

    So don't try this at home. But if you do, bring a friend (and a camera.)
  20. Crooked Creek

    Crooked Creek Been here awhile

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    New packraft seems to work ok. Fell off a few beaver dams no problem.

    <iframe src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/kdXsZJRPI3E?rel=0" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="480" width="640"></iframe>

    When for a ride on the R2 today. The river wasn't open, but the creek was and I couldn't resist :D.