When a project gets out of hand: Building two DR650 RTW bikes

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by micko01, Jul 4, 2014.

  1. redmurty

    redmurty Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2010
    Oddometer:
    122
    Location:
    Stourbridge West Mids
    Really nice work Mick

    cheers Spud
    #21
  2. micko01

    micko01 another DR650 rider

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    565
    Location:
    Back to reality.... WestOz
    Headlight Tower continued

    Right, next was to determine where the projectors needed to sit. I dummied up the fairing a couple of times at different heights. I used a heap of different photos of rally bikes, and then sat on the bike with the fairing at quite a few different heights until I got something I thought was about right. Here it is in basically the final position height wise, but obviously needing a lot of adjustment horizontally.

    [​IMG]

    I made a few final adjustments to a bit of shs I was using to locate the headlight tower. This kept the height the same but moved it a bit further away.

    [​IMG]

    So now I started the trellis frame which would be the headlight tower. Started with the first lower bar of 16mm OD x 1.2 pipe..…

    [​IMG]

    and checked the clearance on full lock. There is about 2mm of clearance against the fork.

    [​IMG]

    Added the second lower bar.

    [​IMG]

    Throughout the process I had to check and double check the position and angle of the tower. Before starting I measured the angle of the standard headlight frame relative to the headstem. Then I set up the frame on some chocks so it was level and the headstem was at the right angle so the tower would be vertical.

    [​IMG]

    Once it was in the right spot, the top two bars were added. I used 19mm OD x 1.2 pipe for these as the beams are longer.

    [​IMG]

    Test fitted the projectors to ensure they would clear the top bars.

    [​IMG]

    And then started the triangulation. I put a small beam between the two lower bars to give it some strength horizontally.

    [​IMG]

    Then start with the vertical triangulation.

    [​IMG]

    Bit of welding porn

    [​IMG]

    And finished, all 1.4kg of it.

    [​IMG]

    Couple photos of the rubber mounts

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    And test fitted the projectors. In this photo I’ve added the mounts for the ballasts (on the bottom bar) and the fuse box (top bar).

    [​IMG]

    When welding the first tower I was very careful to weld the frame symmetrically. I’d weld one side, then go to the opposite side, and back to ensure the heat was pulling evenly and frame stayed pretty straight. On the second tower I was rushing and welded too much on one side of the frame before moving to the other. This pulled the tower to one side quite badly.

    [​IMG]

    This was an “ah shitballs” moment.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I ended up just bashing on the female side of the interference fit to straighten up the frame.

    [​IMG]

    It took a lot of bashing and checking and bashing back but I got there. It did a bit of damage to the tight interference fit but it was still pretty tight and fine once bolted up. Here it is on the frame ready for the motor to go back in.

    [​IMG]

    Ok, next up. Fairing, dash and fender mounting.
    #22
    Bem and Colebatch like this.
  3. nzrian

    nzrian renegade master Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,823
    Location:
    Queenstown , NZ
    Nice work, looking forward to the rest of the build.:lurk:lurk
    #23
  4. bluestar

    bluestar sheep shagger

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2014
    Oddometer:
    26,950
    Location:
    sheep pen
    Very nice work. :thumb
    #24
  5. micko01

    micko01 another DR650 rider

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    565
    Location:
    Back to reality.... WestOz
    Forks, fairing and fender… Three F’s – and there were many many more f's to come during this part of the bike build! This post will be a bit all over the place I think but hopefully it all comes together at the end and works out ok.

    Just a bit of background. The forks we ended up going with were 47mm USD showa’s – a very common fork on dirt bikes in the mid to late naughties. KXF’s, CRFs and RMZ’s of this era all use this fork. The RMZ version however, specifically the 05-11 RMZ450 and 07-11 RMZ250 (??? I think 2011 it ended but check this, definitely 07 is right pre 07 the RMZ250 was actually a Kawasaki with KYB forks), bolts straight up to the DR650 – the headstem and bearings are exactly the same.

    Before I had actually lifted a spanner, while I was still dreaming about what weird and wonderful things I could get up to I found an ad on Gumtree (Oz version of Craigslist for Nth American followers) from a bloke wrecking an 05 RMZ 450 which had a blown motor. He was out in the wheatbelt, about 2.5 hours from home. He was a real character and offered me the entire front end of this bike for $450. No worries seeya tomorrow morning I said.

    Turns out this fella was a proper bike nut and had a shed full of bikes – mostly eighties and nineties Japanese sports bikes. He had about 50 of them, including probably 15 early GSXR’s, plus heaps of nineties dirt bikes (another 20?), and a few odd balls like an 80’s Guzzi I couldn’t recognize which he was restoring. We had a good chat for an hour or so in the end.

    I always wanted the two bikes to be as similar as possible to minimise the amount of spares I had to carry, so the problem now was that I needed another RMZ front end. I ended up sourcing all the bits I needed off ebay for the second bike – for a fair bit more than 450 bucks. And so begun the cycle of project snowballing; I’d dream and drool about some idea, something would come up, I’d want it, I’d get it…… and then I’d need another one.

    Ok enough of that, I’ll get on with it. Towards the end of the frame reinforcement stage but before building the headlight tower, I bolted on the tank and put the forks on – straight bolt up.

    [​IMG]

    I decided to just weld some new steering stops on the frame, so cut some 16x1.2 pipe, capped them and welded them on.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Fitting the fairing was a case of much trimming and test fitting. I used a 5” grinder with a pretty blunt flapper disc on it for trimming.

    [​IMG]

    And now fitting better.

    [​IMG]

    The problem with the headlights fitting the holes in the fairing was starting to cause some headaches. As the TL projectors physically could not be any closer together vertically than they were mounted, the projectors were never going to be perfectly central in the headlight holes. But the 6mm horizontal misalignment of the headlight holes in the fairing meant that the headlights looked a bit “off”. This is probably the most disappointing bit of the build; the final finish of the headlights looks a bit amateur. In the photo below I’ve just got the fairing sitting on the top headlight – the final mounted position has the fairing about 3 or 4mm lower so the bottom projector better fits better in the bottom hole…. errrr so to speak.

    [​IMG]

    Moving on, a few measurements and marks to locate the fairing mounts.

    [​IMG]

    I sourced some ½ turn fairing fasteners and pop riveted them to some fabricated mounts that would be welded to the headlight tower. Here you can see some bicycle tube between the fairing and the 4 mounts. I ended up using some HD motorcycle tube for this and glueing it to the fairing. It was a bit thicker and hopefully will provide some damping for the fiberglass fairing.

    [​IMG]

    Mounts welded to the headlight tower, and it looks like this.

    [​IMG]

    Next was the dash. I made a cardboard dummy of want I needed first (sorry no photo). I got some 1.6mm aluminium and bent it up with 4 pieces of heavy angle iron, some g-clamps and a pair of shifters.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    And then mounted it on the headlight tower. The top mount would use the AMPS bolt pattern so I could bolt a RAM ball to it for the GPS. The eagle eyed will probably pick a pretty big problem with what I’ve built here in this photo… I sure didn’t at the time but I’ll go into it later this post.

    [​IMG]

    And this is what the Mk1 mounts looked like. I used 2 pieces of 16mm pipe standing up for the top mount, and some very lightweight steel for a bottom bar (can see it at the back of the photo). I trimmed back some lightweight angle to something like 8x4mm x 1.2 thick so it was very lightweight.

    [​IMG]

    Then the dash was trimmed to fit and all the holes drilled for the switches and other electrics. I’ll go into the electrics in a later post.

    [​IMG]

    This is what the headlight tower then looked like with the dash and fairing mounts attached. This was Mk2 dash mount (don’t worry, there is a Mk3) – I ended up cutting the first mount off because I had misaligned the dash, and decided to save some weight (and time) by reducing the top dash mount from 2 pieces of pipe to one.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    With the dash mounted, I moved onto sorting out the controls which meant mounting the steering dampers. This was a headache inducing stage. My bike had a RalleMoto RM1 steering damper (re-badged MSC Titan) on it which I really liked. The handle bar mount spacing on a DR is 100mm, and the RMZ is 95mm, so my damper mount wouldn’t fit. I looked into getting an underbar damper mount with 95mm spacing but couldn’t find one. I then looked into getting a RMZ top triple clamp with 100mm bar mount spacing and found a nice TAG one for $100 delivered. Nice, I'll have that. It had two bar positions and everything, so in a moment of incompletely thought-through creativity I made a steering damper post with two positions to match.

    [​IMG]

    I then turned the bars to test out my new toy and realized the damper was rotating on a different plane to the triple clamps, as the bar mount holes in the RalleMoto DR650 mount are drilled and tapped at 20 degrees from perpendicular. This is because the bar mount holes in the standard DR top triple clamp are at 20 degrees. So towards full lock the damper arm was twisting in the damper post.

    I was pretty pissed off I hadn’t realized this was going to happen. It was so obvious when you think about it, I just hadn’t thought it through properly. Next I test turned the bars full lock and the bark busters hit the dash before the steering stops hit. Oh you dirty f#$@% !^#&*@#*$

    I had a pretty genuine flip out when this happened. A real good one.

    When I calmed down I called the good people at MSC and ordered an underbar mount for a WRF450, which has 100mm bar spacing and mount holes are drilled square, not at 20 degrees. And to get the bars to clear the dash, I kept adding spacers until it was high enough to clear. I ended up with 18mm of aluminium underneath the damper mount.

    For Tanyas’ bike, her forks came with an RG3 top triple clamp which is a nice bit of kit. It had 7/8” bar mounts which was a problem, but I sourced some 1-1/8” RG3 mounts with genuine risers. I then got an over bar damper mount for a GasGas which has 100x40mm bar clamp spacing to fit the RG3 triple. I built a post for hers similar to mine, but higher and only one position.

    [​IMG]

    An interesting thing was, I built the post after test fitting my blue safari tank. It had no fuel in it at the time so was easier than the yellow one which had some residual fuel in it. Then, when fitting the yellow tank, the tank hit the damper post. Only thing I can assume is that they have swelled differently over the years. I ended up cutting off the post which is in the photo above and moving it as close as possible to the headstem so it cleared the tank. I also changed it from 19x1.2mm pipe to 16x1.2mm pipe to give it extra clearance.

    I sourced some fiberglass KTM 990 Adventure fenders. Since seeing Colebatch’s XChallenge with a low fender, it is something I had wanted to do. The fiberglass fender was a little flimsy so we decided to bolster it with a hoop of 25x2mm flat around the back. Here is my old man test fitting it.

    [​IMG]

    I didn’t take too many photos of this part of the build, so I’ll use a few photos from our shakedown trip. The lower stanchion bolts went straight in the RMZ lower fork protector holes. The resulting height of the fender was perfect..... and it made life easier for me. I sandwiched the fiberglass in rubber to provide some damping.

    [​IMG]

    And the final result, with fender extender.

    [​IMG]

    The brake line was run conventionally around the inside of the left stanchion and onto the fender. We then bolted on the DR650 runners (with some modification) onto the RMZ forks. In the photo the Vapor speedo cable is run with the brakeline which is a braided galfer unit.

    [​IMG]

    The only problem now was the dash... again with the dash– when I mounted the dash I hadn’t considered the brakeline and where it had to run. I actually hadn’t considered the throttle or clutch cables either. Here in the photo, I’ve already cut some clearance in the middle of the dash for the throttle and clutch cables. I’ve then marked up in blue where I needed clearance for the brakeline to run. It also meant the dash mount had to change slightly – hence Mk3.

    [​IMG]

    Final dash in action.

    [​IMG]

    Well, I think this is a good time to end a monster post.
    #25
  6. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    9,511
    Location:
    Anchorage Alaska
    Quite educational building stuff isn't it!
    I have done similar projects where I had not considered where everything needed to go...
    We learn as we go sometimes.
    And other times we get to learn from the mistakes someone else has made.

    Thanks for the good lessons! :clap

    Looks GREAT!
    #26
  7. micko01

    micko01 another DR650 rider

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    565
    Location:
    Back to reality.... WestOz
    Yep, if you are going to learn from my mistakes then I hope you've got a pen and paper and lot of spare time! This might take a while....:lol3


    #27
  8. Leo.G

    Leo.G Is still learning

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2011
    Oddometer:
    433
    Location:
    Marcos Juárez, Córdoba, Argentina

    In the end mistakes are what make you learn.. or not?

    I've been paying attention closely to the headlight tower and such..
    You'll have news from me as soon as I can buy a retrofit projector.. hehe!

    Thanks for documenting the build so well!
    I'll keep reading..

    Cheers!
    #28
  9. micko01

    micko01 another DR650 rider

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    565
    Location:
    Back to reality.... WestOz
    Yeah we all learn from mistakes, but sometimes we get a lesson too many....

    If you are going to retrofit a projector, get all the hardware done first - ie mount the projector, fairing, then run all cables and set up the bars, then build the dash in the space that's left. I had my sequencing a bit arse about face. In fact, have the top triple clamp and handle bars on during the entire process it will help you visualise the end product and help identify problems earlier.

    #29
  10. Tslapper

    Tslapper #!

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2005
    Oddometer:
    8,043
    Location:
    Mainely here
    Thanks for taking an enormous amount of your time to put this thread up here for us.

    Nice work!
    #30
    TreasureState likes this.
  11. Leo.G

    Leo.G Is still learning

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2011
    Oddometer:
    433
    Location:
    Marcos Juárez, Córdoba, Argentina
    Yes, what I'm trying to do is to improve my headlight just in case I have to travel at night or getting caught in the night...

    I've done some road trips in which I got caught in the night, or in the fog (that's why I asked you), and with a headlight slightly bigger than the one on the XR 250R, even with a xenon kit, you can't hope to have good lighting...

    For now at least the dash is staying stock..
    The other thing is the front fender, maybe I'll be stealing the idea of putting a piece of flat to reinforce the fender just in case..
    #31
  12. micko01

    micko01 another DR650 rider

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    565
    Location:
    Back to reality.... WestOz
    Hey no problem! It is taking some time to document it all but to be honest I am really enjoying it. Its good to get it all down in writing before I forget it all. Its also good to remember where the bikes have come from to now...

    #32
  13. micko01

    micko01 another DR650 rider

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    565
    Location:
    Back to reality.... WestOz
    I never disliked the B&B Offroad bashplate, in fact it is the complete opposite; it’s a bloody good bashplate, very well made and sold for a very reasonable price. My only issue with it and every other DR650 bashplate is its complete waste of space down there. There is so much room in front of and around the motor which is just ignored. And more importantly, its such as ideal place to store things from a weight distribution point of view.

    I looked into what KTMatt (a.k.a Rock Hard Rally Gear) had done in making toolboxes in the bashplate on both sides of the motor and I really liked that idea. Some companies like Force Accessories make bashplates with water tanks for safari bikes, and I really liked that idea too - but sadly they don’t make one for the DR650.

    ......

    On a completely different topic – I like water. I like it a lot. I think this was defined by one quite clear event for me as a kid – on the Gunbarrel Hwy between Carnegie and Warburton in the middle of December the rear axle on the 4WD snapped in half from the massive corrugations. For non-Australians, the Gunbarrel is very remote outback Western Australia where December is low to mid forties (Celsius) every day, and was even more desolate in the 80’s with no SPOT messenger’s and EPIRP’s being too expensive for the average family. We did what you did back then; told the police in Wiluna where you were going and when you expected to get to Warburton. There was a communication breakdown between Wiluna and Warburton however and the alarm was never raised when we didn’t turn up.

    No one came by for 3 days and it was obvious no one was coming. My Dad cut down a tree, which was really just a scrubby bush, tied it under the rear axle with rope, cut down another one and tied it to the first one with some fencing wire and aligned with the car as a skid to support the back of the vehicle, disengaged the rear axle, and skull dragged it by the front wheels in low range second gear for 150kms through the desert. We had to stop every 2 hours or so to cut down another bush because the skid would wear down too much. It took 2 days to do that 150kms to Warburton and we didn’t see another human until we got there. Its safe to say we would have been in very, VERY deep shit if it wasn’t for the extra provisions my folks took “just in case”, and my old man’s ingenuity. As a kid the severity of the situation didn’t register, but as an adult it has really crystalised with me just what went down over those 5 days.

    My feeling on water in remote Australia (and I’m talking proper remote) therefore is this; if you get to where you are going and you have no water left – you have fucked up. Big time. I always like to get to my destination and at the very least have a day or so worth of contingency water ready for the unexpected – 3 litres in reserve for when the shit hits the fan.

    Anyway, that is a pretty longwinded way to explain why I wanted a reserve of water on the bike, but I figure, if I want 3 litres of water at all times every where I go, it should be in the best possible position on the bike. That place is the bashplate.

    ......

    By a twist of fate, I met Treborbig who turned up at my place to buy some pannier frames that I didn’t have. Long story. Anyway, we got to talking and when he mentioned that he worked with aluminium as part of his job, I went into overdrive with ideas and brain farts about custom bashplates and other far fetched goodies and pulled out cardboard models I had made of tool boxes and fuel tanks. I’m pretty sure he thought I was some eccentric nut-job who had been stuck in a filthy shed for too long and decided to help me as an act of charity….

    We cut a deal; he supplied aluminium for 3 bashplates plus my tanks and toolboxes, I supplied him some forks and a few other things for his chopper project, I’d cut and weld it all and he would fold it. Awesome.

    Rightio then enough jibba jabba lets get back to this build report. The bash plate was modeled off the B&B off-road one I already had, but room was made for the tank. Instead of the base of the plate coming up in front of the motor and behind the exhaust, it would come up 50mm forward of that position under the exhaust. The bashplate would be a little narrower than the bottom of the Safari tank which would add more tank capacity and also provide protection to the feet of the rider from anthills. Sounds silly but anthills is a cause of lower leg fractures here in Oz, you clip a small anthill which is hidden on the side of the track, it twists your lower leg around and you get yourself a spiral fracture. Lucky you.

    Everything would be 5083 ally, which I think is pretty ideal, especially for water storage. The base of the bash plate would be made out of 6mm aluminium, mostly because Treborbig had 6mm and 3mm so we chose 6mm. A “lid” of 3mm aluminium would then sit on top of the base and the volume in between would form the tank. I did some rough calcs and came up with 3.5l before taking into account the thickness of the aluminium – I was guessing something like 3.3 would be the final outcome which was ideal.

    The various pieces were cut out. All internal corners where cut with a hole-saw so the resultant corner was round and didn’t concentrate stresses and lead to cracking.

    [​IMG]

    A pretty major problem was I had never welded aluminium before. My old man taught me to stick weld when I was about 12 so I’ve got a fair degree of backyard experience with steel, but this would be my first project with ally. I did a couple test welds and think I picked it up reasonably quickly. First weld was the disaster on the right, second in the middle was better. Third on the left I turned the gas down to see what happens and you can see the oxidation marks through the bead.

    [​IMG]

    I played around a bit more and got it pretty sorted.

    [​IMG]

    And then got stuck in to the bashplates. Sadly I didn’t take any photos of the bits before or after pressing – just after welding. The bashplate would be made out of 4 parts - a base, a lid and two wings; this is a photo of the first wing welded to the base.

    [​IMG]

    And the bottom of the bashplate completed - the base with two wings attached.

    [​IMG]

    Here is the lid going on to form the tank.

    [​IMG]

    And three bashplates partly completed. 2 have the lids on to form tanks – Treborbig was umming and ahhing about his and decided to turn his into a tool box instead, so I haven’t welded the lid into the 3rd one.

    [​IMG]

    Next was to mount it. This is a first fit up to a bare frame. I used the factory bash plate mounts which where reinforced (see earlier post) – this made mounting quicker and easier. I counter sunk the holes with a 16mm drill bit I had which was perfect – sorry no photo.

    [​IMG]

    I’m actually missing a few photos through this process which is unfortunate. I sourced some 1” weld in fuel fillers which are designed for marine applications, but would work well for this. The filler was put on the right hand side which would be the high side when the bike was on its side stand. I also welded on a plate which would mount the bashplate in the same manner as the B&B one. You can see these here in this photo.

    [​IMG]

    You may have also noticed the little hole cut in the front? No? Well, my measuring was a little off when designing the bashplate. There should have been a couple mm of clearance to the exhaust, but when I mounted it the lid of the bashplate was actually pushing on the exhaust. I was worried that if I had a good sized hit on the bashplate it would shear the exhaust off at the head, which would be a sub-optimal outcome in deepest darkest Africa. I needed some clearance, so cut some with the 5” grinder and bent up a bit of ally to fill the hole.

    [​IMG]

    And welded up - come up pretty good it thought.

    [​IMG]

    And clearing the exhaust!

    [​IMG]

    There is some space down the sides and I am presently trying to work up the motivation to turn these into little storage areas. This is the right side.

    [​IMG]

    And the left side. Note the nipple for draining the tank. I welded on a boss very tight to the left hand cradle, and drilled and tapped it out and installed a stainless steel barb. There is now a very small piece of 6mm pipe and an inline petcock for draining the tanks.

    [​IMG]

    And to prove they work – a photo of my dad watering the bashplate with garden hose before we set off on our shakedown trip. For the record they ended up at 3.1l capacity but not too sure of weight, I'd estimate less then 3.5kg mounted.

    [​IMG]

    Well that should do it for now. I’ll do a another post later if I end up putting little storage containers on the sides of the bashplate. I think I will…. might have to cut another deal with Treborbig......

    Cheers, Mick
    #33
    TreasureState likes this.
  14. boboneleg

    boboneleg we can rebuild him.

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,744
    Location:
    Bristol UK
    On a completely different topic – I like water. I like it a lot. I think this was defined by one quite clear event for me as a kid – on the Gunbarrel Hwy between Carnegie and Warburton in the middle of December the rear axle on the 4WD snapped in half from the massive corrugations. For non-Australians, the Gunbarrel is very remote outback Western Australia where December is low to mid forties (Celsius) every day, and was even more desolate in the 80’s with no SPOT messenger’s and EPIRP’s being too expensive for the average family. We did what you did back then; told the police in Wiluna where you were going and when you expected to get to Warburton. There was a communication breakdown between Wiluna and Warburton however and the alarm was never raised when we didn’t turn up.

    No one came by for 3 days and it was obvious no one was coming. My Dad cut down a tree, which was really just a scrubby bush, tied it under the rear axle with rope, cut down another one and tied it to the first one with some fencing wire and aligned with the car as a skid to support the back of the vehicle, disengaged the rear axle, and skull dragged it by the front wheels in low range second gear for 150kms through the desert. We had to stop every 2 hours or so to cut down another bush because the skid would wear down too much. It took 2 days to do that 150kms to Warburton and we didn’t see another human until we got there. Its safe to say we would have been in very, VERY deep shit if it wasn’t for the extra provisions my folks took “just in case”, and my old man’s ingenuity. As a kid the severity of the situation didn’t register, but as an adult it has really crystalised with me just what went down over those 5 days.

    My feeling on water in remote Australia (and I’m talking proper remote) therefore is this; if you get to where you are going and you have no water left – you have fucked up. Big time. I always like to get to my destination and at the very least have a day or so worth of contingency water ready for the unexpected – 3 litres in reserve for when the shit hits the fan.

    Anyway, that is a pretty longwinded way to explain why I wanted a reserve of water on the bike, but I figure, if I want 3 litres of water at all times every where I go, it should be in the best possible position on the bike. That place is the bashplate.


    Your dad sounds like a pretty cool dude :clap

    Great fabrication skills by yourself, I've just bought a DR650SE a couple of days ago (pretty rare in UK) but I don't think I'll be doing as much as you to it :lol3
    #34
    Anthiron and TreasureState like this.
  15. micko01

    micko01 another DR650 rider

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    565
    Location:
    Back to reality.... WestOz
    G'day Bob. Hope you enjoy your DR. They certainly aren't the most high tech bike getting about, but like a good hammer, they get a lot of jobs done.
    #35
  16. Kernel

    Kernel Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2010
    Oddometer:
    232
    :ear
    #36
  17. micko01

    micko01 another DR650 rider

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    565
    Location:
    Back to reality.... WestOz
    G'day kernel, yep more build report coming in a couple days. The last week and a bit has been hectic - we've packed the last of our stuff into storage, dropped the the bikes off to Qantas freight on Monday to go to Durban and now we are in the middle of a drive from wa to qld. Busy busy.
    #37
  18. micko01

    micko01 another DR650 rider

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    565
    Location:
    Back to reality.... WestOz
    Sorry for the delay in getting back to this thread – we have had a hectic last couple weeks packing all our stuff into storage, getting the DR’s on their way to Africa, cleaning and leaving our house and then driving 4500kms across the country. Its been a busy time. We are currently in transit in Mumbai Airport, the DR’s should have arrived in Durban today and we land in just a couple of hours. Fark!

    ………..

    This is just a quick follow up from last post with a few extra photos of the bash plates. I had to pull mine off after the shakedown trip to drill the sump plug hole and also cut the wings back slightly; occasionally the tip of my boots would hit the wings when reaching for the gear lever, especially when going up a gear. So I took another 10mm of which seems to have sorted it out. While it was off I got some extra photos of the mounts and also the hole cut for the accessing the sump plug.

    Here is the front mount. I added a small strip of 6mm to the 4mm plate to thicken up the section where the bolts go through.

    [​IMG]

    And hole for sump plug. 30mm holesaw I think – can’t really remember I just grabbed one and drilled it.

    [​IMG]

    I also played with some ideas for building some storage on the side of the bashplate – but I ran out of time……… by a lot! In retrospect I was really just goofing off and procrastinating while I should have been packing the house! Maybe if I get bored on the road and get access to a TIG and some ally I might have a play. It’s a bit of a shame really as it’s a great spot for storing stuff from weight distribution point of view.

    [​IMG]

    And as a side note, I’m pretty sure my memory of weighing the bashplate was significantly off – when I had it in my hands this time around it is definitely lighter than 4kgs, which is what I posted in the last post. So I’ve edited that post. We had already packed away the scales so I couldn’t measure it again but I’m thinking it was more like 3 or 3 and a bit.

    ………..

    Moving onto the rest of the build. I really wanted to start on the post for the tanks, but first I need to explain the rear rack as the mounting of this impacts the tanks.

    To maximise space for the tank, the toolbox and its mounting points needed to go, along with the helmet lock and rear tab that most pannier frames and rear racks mount to. These were all cut off.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The rear tab that was removed would need to be replaced with something so the fuel tank and rear rack could be mounted. I already had the 25mm flat stood up on end on the top side of the subframe from my first round of reinforcements a couple of years ago. This would be the perfect place to mount the luggage on.

    The OEM rear tab that mounts most racks and pannier frames is a pretty crack prone bit of rubbish for a couple of reasons. It’s too thin and it is only in one plane so it has no torsional strength. Another smaller issue is the welds are in tension - the weakest orientation for a weld to be stressed. Another benefit of moving the mount to the top of the subframe is it would load the welds in shear which is stronger.

    So I drilled a 13mm hole across the top of the subframe tube through the two bits of 25mm flat.

    [​IMG]

    And installed some 25mm long M8x1.25 coupling nuts which were ground down slightly to fit in the 13mm hole. These would be welded in to form the mount.

    [​IMG]

    When welding in the nut, I had a bolt indexed as a heat sink to reduce the risk of damaging the thread. I welded the inside too but don't have a photo of that.

    [​IMG]

    And the other side. In this photo you can see I’ve cut off the exhaust mount of the standard can and welded it to the frame. I can’t remember who I stole this idea off but I thought it was a good one so I did it too.

    [​IMG]

    I then had to drill a hole in the rear plastic to fit the new mounting bolts through.

    [​IMG]

    Next was to build the rear rack. Both bikes did have rear racks already – mine was a hatchet job from the previous owner that I had modified and re-welded back to something pretty presentable and strong. It was a pretty decent rack in the end but a little bit on the heavy side. The one on Tanya’s bike I had made and it was a fair bit lighter – however when I built it I didn’t have a pipe bender so it had mitered corners which weren’t exactly pretty.

    The rack that Erik built for Colebatchs Xchallange where the top of the rear mudguard plastic was the level of the rack itself I thought was a great design so I wanted to replicate that for the DR650’s.

    Sadly I don’t have a heap of photos of the rear rack build. I started by building the mounts which were 16x1.2mm pipe cut to about 20mm and capped with 2mm flat. The ends were drilled out for the mounting bolts to go through. These would then land the pipe which would be the rack.

    I then bent up some 19x1.2mm pipe and started cutting to make the rack.

    [​IMG]

    And this is what it ended up looking like sitting on the ground cooling down.

    [​IMG]

    One of the problems of not having a jig was the rack needed a bit of pushing a pulling to re-mount after it had been welded up on the bench. But once that was done, it got painted and mounted. I don’t have any photos of the finished product before mounting but here is one from when I was test fitting the pannier bags that I have cropped to show the rack. I think it shows quite well how low the rack sits. You can also see the right hand rear indicator mounted and one of two droppers which got added a bit later to mount the right hand side tool box.

    I should also note that I lived in a rental property – I take no responsibility at all for that monstrosity of a brick wall in the background!!!!

    [​IMG]

    And another photo cropped to show the rack. In final form, including the two tool box mounting droppers, the rack was 1.6kg which I was pretty happy with.

    [​IMG]

    Ok, next up -> rear fuel tank.
    #38
    TreasureState and Colebatch like this.
  19. Night Falcon

    Night Falcon Structural Failure

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2008
    Oddometer:
    9,397
    Location:
    New Zealand
    wow excellent build/s Hope all goes well in Africa!
    #39
  20. Kernel

    Kernel Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2010
    Oddometer:
    232
    That seat looks comfy!!
    #40