When do you call it quits?

Discussion in 'Face Plant' started by Colorado Ron, Aug 21, 2012.

  1. mikegc

    mikegc Long timer Super Supporter Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2008
    Oddometer:
    4,762
    Location:
    High Point, NC
    :thumb

    Hey, did you find a cradle for you GPS? I "hollered" at you over on the What Have You Done to Your GS thread. I've got one for a zumo 665 in stock and it'll work with a Nav V.

    Mike
  2. zoomcarve

    zoomcarve Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2016
    Oddometer:
    28
    This is my constant internal debate- when to call it quits. Quit which part of my riding, keep which motorcycle- on-highway, gravel travel, singletrack, high mountains, all or none?

    After a long adventure trip with highway and gravel roads, back at home crashed the dirt bike on singletrack and got chest wall injuries; thus, off work for a few weeks. The injury occurred with front end washout, something that has not happened to me for decades! I was riding a mountain singletrack that I have ridden for decades without incident!

    I was complacent, and riding a gear too high (fast) for no reason. Really sort of spacing out, shifted and brapped the enduro bike and bam! Inexcusable and uncharacteristic- yet there I was, not concentrating, too fast, down with injury. I was wearing full body armor, and would have been critically injured in all likelihood without the armor. The impact was centered on a plate of my armored 'sweater' yet contused and fractured my chest wall beneath.

    A friend is a medical professional and likes to say about injuries while riding motorcycles are not "IF - but WHEN!" The article below about base jumping rather confirms this idea.

    Thus, it continues. This is my constant internal debate- when to call it quits. Quit which part of my riding, keep which motorcycle- on-highway, gravel travel, singletrack, high mountains, all or none?



    http://www.nationalgeographic.com/a...0160915&utm_campaign=Content&utm_rd=407166141

    Quote from the article- After years of narrow misses and seeing friends die who were better and more experienced than he, McNamara concluded, “BASE jumping does not get safer with experience.”
  3. Tin Dirigible

    Tin Dirigible Felix LaPu Belle

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2012
    Oddometer:
    2,705
    Location:
    Midwest, near the ocean
    7/24/2000

    the last time I rode a motorcycle greater than 15 miles, it was closer to 30

    very next day, at work I suffered a career ending and life changing injury
    broken leg / hip / pelvis
    it would be a couple of years before I would even be able to ride again
    and after considering the amount of pain I endured, the decision was easy
    combine that with a large dose of Warfarin (for life), even a minor incident
    with a helmet could result in further permanent injury

    I'm confident in my own abilities, its other peoples driving habits I question
    riding on the street for a limited number of years made me a much better driver
    factor in the explosion of cellphones and related distractions, it really was a no brainer

    do I miss owning and riding a big street bike, you're g/d right !!
    but do the risks outweigh the fun?,...not so much
    twinrider likes this.
  4. BMgreenmt

    BMgreenmt Long timer

    Joined:
    May 3, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,429
    Location:
    Vermont
    Inspiring.
  5. stevent

    stevent Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2010
    Oddometer:
    277
    Location:
    Near Tacoma
    I gave up commuting on the bike this year. I got hit last October for the 3rd time on the freeway. Once in 2005 getting stuck in the middle of a multi-car pile up, which hurt my back and totaled my Triumph Trophy, again in 2014 getting cut off and punted on my HD by a hit and run motorist which crushed and dislocated my ankle, giving me a 3 month wheelchair and walker vacation and again last October which totaled my Super Tenere, getting rear ended by some girl texting on a cell phone which chipped my elbow and shoulder. All this wearing high quality riding gear and riding well within the speed limit etc. I contemplated giving up riding all together but really couldn't do it. I bought a used Triumph Tiger which I ride around for fun or the very occasional commute and I'm pretty comfortable with that, I just can't see doing the daily 75 mile grind on the bike anymore. Way too much traffic, too many inattentive / asleep at the wheel / texting and cell phoning drivers on the freeway these days.

    I totally understand someone giving it up if they feel the need, I really enjoy just getting out and about but the commute bit is just too stressful anymore.
    twinrider likes this.
  6. anotheroldfart

    anotheroldfart Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2010
    Oddometer:
    522
    Location:
    Arizona
    I would like to remind your "medical professional" that a hell of a lot more people die in a hospital from medical screw ups, than from a motorcycle crash.
  7. Plebeian

    Plebeian Scruffy-Looking Nerf Herder Supporter

    Joined:
    May 14, 2015
    Oddometer:
    6,509
    Location:
    Shoreview, MN
    "Not if but when" applies to playing basketball as well...
  8. anotheroldfart

    anotheroldfart Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2010
    Oddometer:
    522
    Location:
    Arizona
  9. zoomcarve

    zoomcarve Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2016
    Oddometer:
    28
    It seems that in the entirety of discussion here....

    A crash is not 'if' but 'when' is not far off. Few have not crashed a motorcycle, few have not been injured riding a motorcycle.
  10. zoomcarve

    zoomcarve Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2016
    Oddometer:
    28
  11. Alpinescars

    Alpinescars n00b

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2016
    Oddometer:
    9
    Location:
    London
    I have had a number of close friends leave this earth over the last 5 years. One broke his neck skiiing whilst on a family holiday with his wife and 4 kids. Two in car accidents - one a driver and one a passenger. One, a tree surgeon who didn't replace a harness, which failed at over 100 feet. Plus, another was paralyzed after a horse-riding accident and another was paralyzed from the neck down after turning round in his kitchen and catching his chin just in the wrong place on an open cupboard door. I had another dear friend who lived a hugely risk-averse life, ploughed everything into his pension/retirement pot and on his last day in the office died of a heart attack whilst waiting for a bus home. Sure, I know the risks of riding a bike. For me, a life without risk is not a life worth living. I have young children. Apart from my family, riding a motorcycle is the one thing in my life that gives me the greatest pleasure. It makes me happy and have a healthy state of mind. I owe it to my family to be happy and have a healthy state of mind. Just my ramblings... :-)
    ultrasheen and MrCrisper like this.
  12. FredBGG

    FredBGG Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2015
    Oddometer:
    3,088
    This is very true for riding motorcycles on public roads.

    Experience does make you safer, but really only over a certain period of the learning curve. Experience reaches a point where more experience does not make you grow eyes out of the back of your head and miraculously make cars drive through you without killing you.
    zoomcarve likes this.
  13. SnipTheDog

    SnipTheDog Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2015
    Oddometer:
    507
    Location:
    San Jose
    My 2cents: I stopped commuting on the bike after 10 years of daily riding. I still enjoy riding dirt bikes, and will continue to ride. I'll probably try to ride some dual sport events, but my street riding days in heavy traffic are hopefully behind me.

    There is way too much competition and distraction getting to work these days. I'd rather get up a little earlier and avoid the traffic as much as possible.
  14. scfrank

    scfrank Old farts riding club. Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2005
    Oddometer:
    25,091
    Location:
    Upstate SC
    Just now recovering from a fall down stairs while on a riding trip with my buddies. Took a wrong turn down a dark hallway in a strange house, fell down 13 stairs. 13 stitches in the galea, under your scalp, and 18 staples in scalp. Very scary at the time. Rode all day the day before, 250 miles at a spirited pace without incident. Yes, I know, walking down a dark hallway with out a light is stupid. I paid the price. Life is full of risk and one can mitigate it somewhat. Motorcycling is risky, walking down a dark hallway is more so. One, I am committed to stop doing.
    ultrasheen and zoomcarve like this.
  15. zoomcarve

    zoomcarve Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2016
    Oddometer:
    28
    Wow. Sorry for the loss. Decades ago I had similar experiences with acquaintances' accidents.

    What you say is a valid and strong point! Reduce the risk, live your life!
    Not intending to offend, some folks live in environments with scarcely any risk, and what risk exists in their life is controlled by others. As a result, some folks it seems are not attuned as intensely to risk. Bla bla, I hope this makes some sense...?
  16. Unca Fud

    Unca Fud nrpetersen

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2006
    Oddometer:
    268
    Location:
    Minnetonka MN
    Just found out today an 88 (yes!) year old riding buddy rode his Harley from Minnesota to Alaska and back this last summer. Details to follow..........
    mikegc and zoomcarve like this.
  17. RedRover_CO

    RedRover_CO Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2016
    Oddometer:
    119
    Just want to say thanks to all the posts in this thread. I've gained some valuable personal perspective from what you all have shared.
  18. lulu

    lulu Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2009
    Oddometer:
    103
    Location:
    Schenectady NY
    I can't say I ever extensively rode in my life. I enjoy it very much, but when I had time I had no money, and when I had money I had no time. I put some miles on my bikes, but a lot less than some people here do. I'm not the greatest rider, I don't even like going fast.

    One year after my first child was born, I took a cross country trip. Through Lolo Pass, I was passed by a speeding ambulance. 20-30 minutes later, I reached the accident scene. There was a motorcycle on the side of the road, and I think what I saw was the paramedics closing a bag over a body laying on a stretcher. I'm not 100% sure this it what I actually saw, because I passed the scene quite quickly. I finished the trip with dark thoughts in mind, and was happy to get back home. This was with only one child, and a healthy wife.

    Two years ago, during my wife's pregnancy with our second child, we found out she had cancer. Thankfully not the kind of cancer that leaves you with only 6 months to live, but not benign either, so chemotherapy, surgery, radiation. All that to only lower the chances of the cancer coming back, no guaranty that it'll work. One year after the end of the treatment, she's still alive, the cancer has not come back yet, but it could. She is pretty young, and as I understand it, cancer like young people.

    I decided I wanted our kids to have a reasonable chance to have at least one parent throughout their childhood. I did not totally quit motorcycling altogether, but the three bikes I have total 114 years, and sometimes see a deserted road on an early Sunday mornings. No more. I decided it will be so until my children are 18. My bikes will be 55 then!

    Reading through the posts (it was in 2014, that thread was already started) helped me made this decision, and comfort me into thinking this is the right one. Logically, it is the right decision, but emotionally, it wasn't that obvious. At the time, I had just bought my first new motorcycle, an F700GS, and I sold it losing lots of money. It did not bother me at all, on the contrary, the only feeling I had was relief.

    Thank you very much to the people who took the time to write their story.

    (please forgive my english, French is my native language)
  19. Falconfixer

    Falconfixer It is what it is....

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,066
    Location:
    Lost Wages, Nv
    This question has been bugging me so much lately, I had to do a search for this thread. I've done very little riding in the last year, and the more I go without riding, the less I want to do it. I wanted my first bike so bad I had to join the military, get out of my home town to get one. And now, only 16 years later, I have zero desire to go ride. I have two KTM's in the garage just collecting dust. Not sure what the hell happened to me.

    Hell maybe I'm not even in the right thread. This one seems to be more of a thread about not riding, in order to preserve yourself and life.

    Maybe, Is it that I live in Las Vegas? For me, it's just a hassle to ride now, it's a chore. I rode my KTM 950 to work yesterday, don't think I smiled once, going there and back. Do I need a different bike? Sorry, too many questions all at once, and I'm not even PUI. Just totally mixed up about what to do next. I keep looking at a new GSA, but honestly, not even sure I'd actually ride it. Sad....

    EDIT- just realized that I was in Faceplant and not Inmates. Oops, sorry
  20. FredBGG

    FredBGG Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2015
    Oddometer:
    3,088
    I can totally understand losing the wish to ride a motorcycle on the street.

    Maybe time for a motocross bike? Lots of nice dirt around Las Vegas!