When do you call it quits?

Discussion in 'Face Plant' started by Colorado Ron, Aug 21, 2012.

  1. s4awd

    s4awd Anywhere but here.

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    I guess how I felt was that when I was happy with my job and was successful, I began to play it safe and stay away from risky activities. I started asking myself... Hey, you have a great job and make good coin, why risk becoming a statistic when riding your motorcycle? etc.
    Desce likes this.
  2. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    And for some reason, I never think of riding as much of a risk.
    It might be, but I do not ride in bad places at bad times so it seems low risk to me.

    There is always SOME risk, I just do not think about it.
  3. browneye

    browneye PIN IT & BANG GEARS

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  4. FredBGG

    FredBGG Long timer

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    I don't think people quit because they are afraid they will crash...... I think it's more about being crashed into and killed, crippled by some douchbag drunk etc etc
    One you can control to a certain extent. The other is just a crap shoot.

    Life is short, but there are many things one can do other than ride motorcycles on the streets. If you think about it there is more dirt in the world than asphalt:-)
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  5. browneye

    browneye PIN IT & BANG GEARS

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    Right...50 years of it! :clap
  6. BigTexasOne

    BigTexasOne Motorcyclist

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    That's cool, but there'll be a trailer attached, so the bike has to go in and out of the bed
  7. FredBGG

    FredBGG Long timer

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    I've seen the Ultimate MX Hauler mounted between a truck and a trailer.
  8. BigTexasOne

    BigTexasOne Motorcyclist

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    Really, Ive got to do more research

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
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  9. Plebeian

    Plebeian Scruffy-Looking Nerf Herder Supporter

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    When you post a question asking if it is time to stop riding, you're past due.
  10. Harpoonalt

    Harpoonalt Been here awhile

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    No shame in quitting riding. When the thrill or fun is gone, it may be time. It's why I quit bowling. :)

    I'm 60, been riding something since I was 12. Being in Vermont, I have the luxury of riding some great twisties and dirt backroads with very little traffic. Our roads suck which is why I ride an S10. It handles potholes and dirt great. I avoid traffic as much as possible which is why I still enjoy riding. In our travels I've visited plenty of places I'd never ride on a bike. Too much traffic and too many distracted or idiot drivers.

    I've contemplated quitting occasionally. We were rear ended by a drunk while in the middle lane on an interstate. Cruise set to 70 and he flew up behind us in the slow lane only to switch behind us right before impact. My bike instincts of scanning 360 at least had me speed up right before I knew he was going to hit us. The Toyota Highlander took it well and the safety features kicked in so we kept control. I still can see the flash of headlights vividly as he switched lanes. My wife still won't get on an interstate. On a bike, I'd have been toast.

    I still have fun, ride too fast, lean too much, but I'm a recreational rider. I don't go out thinking about death or crashing. I do try to remember to pay more attention to everything around me more. Friends have quit. It's sad, but riding these days requires your head in the game more than ever.
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  11. whysub

    whysub Adventurer

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    I am very much of this view. Loved my job for 17 years but sadly management ruined it, so planned my get out for two years hence. Now retired I ride whenever I want to. Whilst working I commuted 20,000 miles a year on the bike into and out of London, and got to hate it-more traffic, rubbish drivers and other factors.

    I have a couple of small bikes-a 125 Cagiva Mito (33 bhp) and a RE Himalyan (24.5 bhp), both so much fun, Mito on the road, Himalayan on the dirt tracks. Riding both to their limits is possible. There is no way I can ride my RC8 to its limits, but do to mine. I know when to back off.

    Small bikes are great on local roads, although the Himalayan will be used for long runs as I now have the time. The RC8 will remain as it is a fantastic long distance, high speed tourer as well as a great track bike. It is also all to easy to lose my licence riding it.
  12. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    That is another reason I like and ride smaller bikes, tickets are very expensive here, and the police have gone underground in un marked cars.
    A serious ticket (more then 20 mph over) can ruin your life.
    The police target minorities, youngsters and people on motorcycles.
  13. slide

    slide A nation with a future

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    You have a 125 cc bike that dyno's at 33 hp? That's one intense engine.
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  14. whysub

    whysub Adventurer

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    It does need a bit more care than most 125's. The best two stroke oil isn't cheap, but service parts such as pistons and rings are easy to find and not too expensive. Working on the engine is easy. Second hand parts were plentiful (these were the first bikes that 17 year olds could have, so many were abused and/or crashed) but are now drying up. Taking them up to 33bhp is fairly straightforward, as this is the power that they were designed with. UK ones were deresticted for the Learner market, but many were at 33 bhp whilst showing L plates.


    It's great to ride on back roads as long as i keep it in the powerband.
  15. slide

    slide A nation with a future

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    Yeah, it sounds like great riding if you keep it on its pipe. Ride safe.
  16. Sal Pairadice

    Sal Pairadice Captain Obvious

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    Post this in the Perfect Line, but applies here ;

    The past Sunday I rode down to the riverfront park in my town on my old CB360 and it attracted a bunch of comments. One older guy showed me pictures of his motorcycle collection. That's all he had anymore, pictures. He rode his whole life, did a coast to coast and some other big adventures and finally felt like he could let it go before he got hurt. And so he sold them all and let it go. I'm not ready to do that, I'm still badly addicted, but if the day comes where I no longer care - I'm out.
    whysub likes this.
  17. mercman

    mercman Been here awhile

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    Well, I'm only 65 but am starting to get arthritis in my hips so getting off and on is getting to be a bit harder but once I'm on all is good and it's like I'm 20 again. With a bit more discretion. I've been down hard twice and might not heal as well with another oops.
    whysub likes this.
  18. AdventurePoser

    AdventurePoser Long timer

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    I'm 67 and enjoy riding very much, but it is no longer a passion like it was 20 years ago. I've done some amazing long rides, and feel I have a few more in me still. Yet, the 2016 GSA is getting very heavy for me, especially two up. I think a couple more years will do it, and then I'll take a look at my options, whether I hang it up, get a lighter bike, or maybe a small RV. I am a photographer, and I could see going this route!
    mikegc likes this.
  19. mikegc

    mikegc Long timer Super Supporter

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    I'm 72 and I cannot seem to get enough of riding. I left home on June 17th and returned last Saturday, July 20, and, frankly, I'm ready to roll again. I meet so many good and interesting people when I travel! I feel like I'm getting and education that's far superior to what I've ever gotten in a classroom. Yeah, my left shoulder needs surgery and I've got to get my third hernia fixed but that's just maintenance. I'll probably get one more good three or four week trip in before I deal with that stuff. I'm going to ride until I cannot.

    Mike
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  20. DaBinChe

    DaBinChe Long timer

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    I'd had the feeling of not riding lots of times it hasn't happened in over 5years now, I will always ride but in a different capacity. But more recently I decided no more big bikes and only stick with small bikes. Currently a Monkey125 and will get a SuperCub when available. I'm thinking maybe a cb300r or a R3 not not sure about those. I also got a Miata last summer because it's part of this plan of not riding big bikes, need some fun off the bikes even small ones.

    So one thing I could suggest for those that are thinking of hanging it up is to hang up the big bikes and try small bikes. Slower speeds more leisurely pace. My Monkey gives me a carefree fun while big bikes give a thrilling fun which safety always looms. Not to say that the small bikes are not dangerous, they are but the level is much reduce because of what they are capable of.
    Rusty J and Lep like this.