When do you call it quits?

Discussion in 'Face Plant' started by Colorado Ron, Aug 21, 2012.

  1. s4awd

    s4awd Anywhere but here.

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Oddometer:
    222
    Location:
    NYC
    When I was happy with my job, I stayed off the bike. That lasted about 10 years. Now at a new job. I now ride literally every weekend. It's all about work life balance. When work sucks, I go out and risk my life. :hmmmmm
  2. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Oddometer:
    9,205
    Location:
    Southern New Jersey
    This does not seem right.
    My work is not bad, somewhat of a dream job really, but I like to ride as much as I can and always have.
    I have fun bikes, small, light under powered bikes its a hoot to go hooligan on.
    If you do not have a bike that makes you feel like you are age 16 when you are on it, you are doing it wrong.
    I am 59, but when I get on my bikes I act like I was about 12 years old.
    I don't ride just to ride, I ride because its too much fun not to!



    Sal Pairadice likes this.
  3. s4awd

    s4awd Anywhere but here.

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Oddometer:
    222
    Location:
    NYC
    I guess how I felt was that when I was happy with my job and was successful, I began to play it safe and stay away from risky activities. I started asking myself... Hey, you have a great job and make good coin, why risk becoming a statistic when riding your motorcycle? etc.
    Desce likes this.
  4. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Oddometer:
    9,205
    Location:
    Southern New Jersey
    And for some reason, I never think of riding as much of a risk.
    It might be, but I do not ride in bad places at bad times so it seems low risk to me.

    There is always SOME risk, I just do not think about it.
  5. browneye

    browneye PIN IT & BANG GEARS

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2009
    Oddometer:
    11,178
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
  6. FredBGG

    FredBGG Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2015
    Oddometer:
    3,088
    I don't think people quit because they are afraid they will crash...... I think it's more about being crashed into and killed, crippled by some douchbag drunk etc etc
    One you can control to a certain extent. The other is just a crap shoot.

    Life is short, but there are many things one can do other than ride motorcycles on the streets. If you think about it there is more dirt in the world than asphalt:-)
    ACR, 10K, s4awd and 1 other person like this.
  7. browneye

    browneye PIN IT & BANG GEARS

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2009
    Oddometer:
    11,178
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    Right...50 years of it! :clap
  8. California

    California Motorcyclist

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,565
    Location:
    Lantana, TX...after 56 years in Carmel Valley, Ca.
    That's cool, but there'll be a trailer attached, so the bike has to go in and out of the bed
  9. FredBGG

    FredBGG Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2015
    Oddometer:
    3,088
    I've seen the Ultimate MX Hauler mounted between a truck and a trailer.
  10. California

    California Motorcyclist

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,565
    Location:
    Lantana, TX...after 56 years in Carmel Valley, Ca.
    Really, Ive got to do more research

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
    DustyRags likes this.
  11. Plebeian

    Plebeian Scruffy-Looking Nerf Herder Supporter

    Joined:
    May 14, 2015
    Oddometer:
    6,249
    Location:
    Shoreview, MN
    When you post a question asking if it is time to stop riding, you're past due.
  12. Harpoonalt

    Harpoonalt Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2010
    Oddometer:
    333
    Location:
    Vermont ....
    No shame in quitting riding. When the thrill or fun is gone, it may be time. It's why I quit bowling. :)

    I'm 60, been riding something since I was 12. Being in Vermont, I have the luxury of riding some great twisties and dirt backroads with very little traffic. Our roads suck which is why I ride an S10. It handles potholes and dirt great. I avoid traffic as much as possible which is why I still enjoy riding. In our travels I've visited plenty of places I'd never ride on a bike. Too much traffic and too many distracted or idiot drivers.

    I've contemplated quitting occasionally. We were rear ended by a drunk while in the middle lane on an interstate. Cruise set to 70 and he flew up behind us in the slow lane only to switch behind us right before impact. My bike instincts of scanning 360 at least had me speed up right before I knew he was going to hit us. The Toyota Highlander took it well and the safety features kicked in so we kept control. I still can see the flash of headlights vividly as he switched lanes. My wife still won't get on an interstate. On a bike, I'd have been toast.

    I still have fun, ride too fast, lean too much, but I'm a recreational rider. I don't go out thinking about death or crashing. I do try to remember to pay more attention to everything around me more. Friends have quit. It's sad, but riding these days requires your head in the game more than ever.
    ACR, Desce, st2sam and 2 others like this.
  13. whysub

    whysub Adventurer

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2003
    Oddometer:
    49
    Location:
    Essex, England
    I am very much of this view. Loved my job for 17 years but sadly management ruined it, so planned my get out for two years hence. Now retired I ride whenever I want to. Whilst working I commuted 20,000 miles a year on the bike into and out of London, and got to hate it-more traffic, rubbish drivers and other factors.

    I have a couple of small bikes-a 125 Cagiva Mito (33 bhp) and a RE Himalyan (24.5 bhp), both so much fun, Mito on the road, Himalayan on the dirt tracks. Riding both to their limits is possible. There is no way I can ride my RC8 to its limits, but do to mine. I know when to back off.

    Small bikes are great on local roads, although the Himalayan will be used for long runs as I now have the time. The RC8 will remain as it is a fantastic long distance, high speed tourer as well as a great track bike. It is also all to easy to lose my licence riding it.
  14. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Oddometer:
    9,205
    Location:
    Southern New Jersey
    That is another reason I like and ride smaller bikes, tickets are very expensive here, and the police have gone underground in un marked cars.
    A serious ticket (more then 20 mph over) can ruin your life.
    The police target minorities, youngsters and people on motorcycles.
  15. slide

    slide A nation with a future

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2003
    Oddometer:
    21,380
    Location:
    NM, USA
    You have a 125 cc bike that dyno's at 33 hp? That's one intense engine.
    RedRover_CO likes this.
  16. whysub

    whysub Adventurer

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2003
    Oddometer:
    49
    Location:
    Essex, England
    It does need a bit more care than most 125's. The best two stroke oil isn't cheap, but service parts such as pistons and rings are easy to find and not too expensive. Working on the engine is easy. Second hand parts were plentiful (these were the first bikes that 17 year olds could have, so many were abused and/or crashed) but are now drying up. Taking them up to 33bhp is fairly straightforward, as this is the power that they were designed with. UK ones were deresticted for the Learner market, but many were at 33 bhp whilst showing L plates.


    It's great to ride on back roads as long as i keep it in the powerband.
  17. slide

    slide A nation with a future

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2003
    Oddometer:
    21,380
    Location:
    NM, USA
    Yeah, it sounds like great riding if you keep it on its pipe. Ride safe.