When do you replace your knobby???

Discussion in 'Australia' started by Wodger63, Jul 28, 2020.

  1. Wodger63

    Wodger63 Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2011
    Oddometer:
    3,580
    Location:
    Hervey Bay
    Serious question, how far do you wear down your rear knobby tyre before you replace it?
    As much as it is nice to have fresh tyres, at what point do you say it's time for replacement?
    On a trip it might be a little different as you might stretch it out to get home instead of changing mid trip.
    Big trips I will normally start with a new pair and keep the old ones for run outs on day trips.
    Currently have a Motoz Rallz rear with about 5mm of knob left in the middle, I have a new one ready to go.
    Do I get another day trip out of it and risk getting spiked on a sharp rock, or say fuck it and fit the new on?
    #1
  2. enookway

    enookway Are we having fun yet?

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    883
    Location:
    Leeton NSW
    Check the weather.
    Any possibility of being wet/slippery - new knobs
    Dry - keep the old tyre.

    Depends on how quickly they wear out too. If you get a full year out of a rear tyre; new one on at start of winter, half worn for dry weather riding in summer then repeat.
    #2
    Giddy Goanna, rvt, Cruz and 7 others like this.
  3. Nogoodnamesleft

    Nogoodnamesleft Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2015
    Oddometer:
    8,225
    Location:
    Brisbane
    I used to be a tight arse. Especially on road tyres.
    I would wait until wear indicators we’re wearing.
    Then I did some math.
    That last 5% or so is worth maybe $10 value on a $200 tyre.
    I don’t have a single part on any of my bikes that costs $10 or less if I was to break them in a fall due to traction.

    with knobbies I treat them like fuel now.
    I don’t wait until empty to fill up either.
    I’ve removed tyres with less than a few hundred km’s because they haven’t felt right to me.
    Once it’s in my head, it’s just a distraction.
    Not worth it in the $$ price of a fall, or insurance excess, if more tread and grip was the difference to stay upright.

    likewise I spend a shitload on bikes and a new knobby is a pittance to what I’ve paid for in farkles to gain a noticeable improvement, like a new knobby can make over a nearly dead one.
    #3
    DOT, GodSilla, sidetrack one and 2 others like this.
  4. BergDonk

    BergDonk Old Enough to Know Better

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Oddometer:
    13,681
    Location:
    Snowy Mountains Oz
    Depends, but I have a heap that many would keep using.

    [​IMG]

    Free to a good home, come and get them.
    #4
  5. Wodger63

    Wodger63 Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2011
    Oddometer:
    3,580
    Location:
    Hervey Bay
    I wouldn't have got a year out of tyre since I was 12 year old.
    #5
  6. Wodger63

    Wodger63 Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2011
    Oddometer:
    3,580
    Location:
    Hervey Bay
    #6
    Kiwirich and Nogoodnamesleft like this.
  7. Nogoodnamesleft

    Nogoodnamesleft Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2015
    Oddometer:
    8,225
    Location:
    Brisbane
    I don’t do much of it,
    so I try and make what little I do, count. :lol3

    if you ever need help to justify a new bike, I got that logic down as well. :D
    #7
    Bounty1 and Wodger63 like this.
  8. Dr AT

    Dr AT Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2006
    Oddometer:
    5,940
    Location:
    maffra, vic
    Depends on how good you are, and your personality.

    The most capable person I ride with turns up to multi day snow trips on rubber that barely qualifies as rim protection. From memory, he took the photo in my avatar and I swear hus rear tyre was one I'd tossed out a couple of years earlier. Rumour is he keeps second hand worn out rubber hardening in the shed so it'll last longer
    #8
    DeLewis, dmsantam, BergDonk and 2 others like this.
  9. Syc08

    Syc08 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2014
    Oddometer:
    216
    Location:
    Sydney Australia
    Winter change em early.
    Summer run em down.
    Start a trip with new tyres that will hopefully last the ride.
    #9
  10. Sundowner

    Sundowner Extended Play

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2009
    Oddometer:
    5,152
    Location:
    Sun Over Beach, Oz
    Run them to the canvas. Knobbies do this wonderful trick where the more you wear down the centre, the wider the contact patch actually gets as the outer knobs touch down and start to provide grip. People change tyres way too soon.
    #10
    dmsantam, AUSSIEADV, Dr AT and 2 others like this.
  11. Ron50

    Ron50 Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,096
    Location:
    Canberra
    I used to keep knobbies on until I got a flat. Another trick of knobbies is that if you drop the pressure from normal the knobs on the sides that weren't doing much work fold in and take over from the bald centre section.
    I took this pick of the XR's rear because I was impressed that it had got up Pork Chop. Pork Chop baldy 2 (2).jpg
    Pork Chop Hill.jpg
    Road tyres I try to change before they get to the canvas.
    tyre time.JPG
    #11
    BergDonk and Sundowner like this.
  12. AUSSIEADV

    AUSSIEADV 2wo left foots

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2006
    Oddometer:
    11,581
    Location:
    Ned and Wild’s fight site
    I buy second hand tyres to put on the rear.

    You can give old tyres a little edge by giving the outer knobs one pass with a hacksaw.
    #12
  13. GodSilla

    GodSilla I did that.

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2006
    Oddometer:
    12,782
    Location:
    GodSowncountry Australia
    When they run out of grip.

    Unless it is a Mitas C07, in which case it is when I get really sick of spinning the rear (around 7 -8k).
    #13
  14. darren70

    darren70 Loud pipes matter

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2013
    Oddometer:
    3,673
    Location:
    Hunter Valley
    I change my tyres every nearly every other week, i just put a rear on the wr before i came inside. Because im a tightarse but i like good tyres i have a range of tyres at home and if its going to be wet (most of the time) i run new or close to, but if the next week i am going somewhere dry and stoney i whack an older set back on. Then when there half done i save them for the 701 for trail rides and rears only reall last a ride or two.
    Low tyre pressure can get you out of trouble if your a bit under done but as far as riding on shit bald tyres go, i ride good dirtbikes with well set up suspension, it would be stupid to run bald tyres and it would reduce my enjoyment. I alway laugh at those mega threads where knobs will spend money on annodised oil filter covers and nav towers but have shit tyres.
    #14
  15. TenereMark

    TenereMark Where are we????????

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2012
    Oddometer:
    485
    Location:
    Dongara, WA
    Shit, I was near your place in February! I could have loaded up.
    Trouble is I already have a stack of secondhand tyres, and as I have only done about 20km on the Tenere in the last two years, it would be wasted economy.
    #15
    BergDonk likes this.
  16. bigredroosta

    bigredroosta Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,611
    Location:
    Western Vic
    Hey Chook I'm still running that retread you got for me light years ago!
    XR250s don't wear out tyres
    PS have you still got the re groover?
    :lol3:lol3
    #16
  17. troy safari carpente

    troy safari carpente Team f5oolery

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2005
    Oddometer:
    34,933
    Location:
    "Swednavia" - f5ederation of Scandwegia
    :y0! THIS ^^^ :clap

    The main reason that a lot of blokes back away from changing worn out rubber (ie. a partially worn hard terrain tire in soft/muddy conditions, is not ideally suited to the conditions... but they press on with it anyway), is that they are more often than not useless (scared of) actually performing the task of changing a tire on their own... So, I suspect it is not so much the "tight arse" (economic) aspect of it - at all. :1drink We've all read the threads by blokes who dread the hour(s) it takes to break the bead on the tire/rim, the skinned knuckles and pinched tube dramas. 99% of time - it is poor technique - or the wrong tools. :augie

    And no... you don't need a thousand dollar tire changing frame in the garage to do so (yes, they do make the job simpler; especially if you perform regular/multiple rubber changes - like if your stupid enough live in Sweden where it rains every other week; and you have sand, mud or rocks to choose between on any given weekend, with four different mx/enduro bikes in the shed to re-sole. :hmmmmm).

    OK, so having the right tire levers and bead breakers etc. makes the task a breeze... but in essence, it all gets down to using the tools in the right manner and not getting greedy trying to take huge bites when cinching the tire bead over the rim. I've seen blokes make a meal of a tire change; even when the have a ISDE wheel frame and bead breaker in their ham fisted mits. :eek7

    If - like Darren - you are comfortable changing a tire and tube with the rudemantary tools needed on the garage floor, then 20 minutes is all it (really) needs to take... regardless of make and model of tire or motorcycle. Sure, it you're trying to get an old dry 5.00 x 18" army issue Trelleborg off your worn out old shitbox of an IT 465, using a rusty Sidchrome flat blade screwdriver and two ancient Bedford tire levers you inherited from grandad... then yes, you're gonna score some barked knuclkes and drop a few "F" expletives. :lol3

    But with the right workspace, some basic tools and the correct technique... with practice you can regularly have fresh rubber whenever you need it, without the anguish and drama... just like Darren. :norton

    Many of us should strive to be more like Darren. :D :nod

    This has been a COVID approved 4.50x18" presentation. :wave
    #17
    DeLewis, Dakar Dan, BergDonk and 5 others like this.
  18. Ron50

    Ron50 Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,096
    Location:
    Canberra
    Just a humble suggestion, Darren. Try running shit tyres - or even much higher tyre pressures if you don't have any - leading up to your next vinduro and then fit the new tyres for the event. I'd be interested in your impressions.

    That technique seemed to give me a real advantage when I was competing - but it could have all been in my head.

    My theory was that the lower traction meant I was riding "loose" all the time so was developing better throttle control, quicker reflexes and more muscle memory of corrective responses.

    Second, even though I would have to be going appreciably faster or harder in an event for the tyres to break traction, the good tyres made the breakaway slower and more controlled, which gave more confidence. It just felt like the bike and I could do nothing wrong.
    #18
    BergDonk, DOT and darren70 like this.
  19. seancampbell

    seancampbell Long timer

    Joined:
    May 28, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,250
    Location:
    Gosford, NSW. Australia
    The local bike shop has a pile of tyres out behind the skip bin. When it's dry, like it was for much of the past couple of years, I would routinely scavenge the best looking rear tyre and run that until it was really rooted. I think I went almost 2 years without buying a rear tyre.

    My thanks go out to all those cashed up riders that need to have the bike shop change their tyres.
    #19
  20. AUSSIEADV

    AUSSIEADV 2wo left foots

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2006
    Oddometer:
    11,581
    Location:
    Ned and Wild’s fight site
    For me the front is more important than the rear. With that said i get good mileage out of my fronts. Its not an economic reason, i run them for as long as im happy with their performance.

    I dont need a sharped edge rear for trail riding.

    Darren, for many running tyres down is not a tightarse decision. I just plain dont need sharp edged tyres.

    B2E79C1E-148F-40A5-A81A-A09B4698A8EC.jpeg
    #20