"When Piggies Fly" Part 2: "We'll be in Scotland afore ye!"

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Rhode trip, Jul 8, 2017.

  1. Rhode trip

    Rhode trip guided by voices Supporter

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    Thanks, Blader54. That's a pretty amusing post. :lol3 Though I confess I had to use google to get the Brough reference...the wiki was a very interesting read. T.E.Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia) bought 8 Brough Superior Motorcycles... though he died on number 7 before the 8th was completed. He apparently suffered from one of the earliest reported cases of multiple bike syndrome (MBS).

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    Thank You, DunkingBird! Your photo is amazing... the stone slabs look exactly the same. And that looks like some nice riding there as well!



    Once we tiptoed past the bovine security guard, we were back on pavement...the A836, and we rolled right down into John O' Groats... a place I first heard of when Charlie and Ewan started The Long Way Down with a shot of the famous signpost.

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    John o' Groats is named after a Dutchman, Jan de Groot, who got the ferry franchise from the king back in 1496. There's still a ferry there to the Orkney Islands, but John o' Groats' real claim to fame is being the north end of Britain... according to the wiki, "The phrase Land's End to John o' Groats is frequently heard both as a literal journey (being the longest possible in Great Britain) and as a metaphor for great or all-encompassing distance, similar to the American phrase coast to coast." These days, it's a tacky mix of souvenir stands and takeaway chip shops.
    Excited at reaching one of the great ADV destinations...we were laughing and hamming it up by the signpost.... and another rider offered to take our picture. I thought we were recreating a publicity shot of Charlie and Ewan.… but I got it wrong.... they were shading their eyes.... not pointing in opposite directions... but there we were...

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    But what really confirms John o' Groats as one of the great ADV destinations.....

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    Is the Starbucks Coffee franchise in the building to the left of the Old John o' Groats House Hotel!

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    I couldn't resist the irony.... we had coffee and brownies to celebrate!

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    You're a real adventure rider now, Mrs Trip!

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    The ferry arrived as we were fooling around... the passengers starting to disembark on the foggy pier...

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    We'd been talking to these folks earlier, and admiring their bike. On a tour from home near Manchester.

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    John o' Groats, despite the reputation, is neither the furthest north, nor the furthest northeast point. A couple miles down a narrow road towards Muckle Stack, and you reach Duncansby Head. The fog did it's best to cloak the view from the edge... you can't even see the waves below...

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    A lighthouse stands just back from the cliffs.

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    Only 11 meters tall, but it sits 67 meters (220 ft) above the sea below, and marks the ACTUAL most northeasterly point on the island of Britain.

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    From Duncansby Head we rode southwest, back into the interior. Past one of the countless old memorials to the fallen from the Great War... a long list of names from where there is no longer even a town... the young men of Canisbay Parish.

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    We flew southwest... on the straightest road in Scotland (or so it seemed).

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    A jog at a crossroads... and straight on again...

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    Wind turbines along the high point.

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    There were a couple of curves by this point... but not many. And then we stumbled on the Grey Cairns of Camster.

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    A wooden walkway across the boggy ground. This is the Round Cairn, the smaller of the two. They were built over 5,000 years ago.

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    Further up the hill, The Long Cairn. Both of these have been rebuilt, to give an idea of what they originally looked like... except the experts don't agree.

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    Some dispute the double stone construction of the base walls. Others argue that the cairns were higher, more sophisticated structures with stepped sides.

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    Both human and animal bones were found in the chambers within. Its thought that the cairns were meeting places for ritual use... though the significance of the site is still a mystery.

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    From Camster we continued south... straight again down to Lybster. From Lybster we took the minor road north to Achavanich.

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    Achavanich means "the field of the stones" and it's the site of a very unusual horseshoe shaped ring of standing stones.

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    Achavanich is unique in the way it's stones are positioned with their edges facing the center of the enclosure. There is the remains of a chambered cairn on the site as well, even older than the 4,000 year old ring of stones. That is Loch Stemster beyond.

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    You can see the fog starting to roll in again... it's late afternoon by now.

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    … and it continued to pile up...thicker and thicker the nearer we got to the coast.

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    Thinning a bit as we topped the ridge.

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    But you can still see the thick bank of fog ahead.

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    We rode the A9 highway south, along the coast. Visibility was very bad, in the fog. I turned on the flashing tail lights we have on the bikes, and we made our way down into Helmsdale. It was clear again as we rode along the river into town.

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    We stayed at the Bridge Hotel, recently remodeled and newly reopened. The owner checked us in, made us some coffee with little cakes, and joined us for a cup in the sitting area.

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    Then we went out for a walk around Helmsdale.

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    Not a lot of restaurants in town. We ended up getting fish and chips to take away at the little shop on the left.

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    And we ate our dinner in the little park across the street.

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  2. ben2go

    ben2go I am Ben! Hear me snore!

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    Great ride. I like the history and education side of your tip reports. :lurk
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  3. Rhode trip

    Rhode trip guided by voices Supporter

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    Thanks, Ben. I find that kind of stuff interesting when we travel, and most of the time what we come across is things I wouldn't have heard of otherwise. Hopefully, it's not too dull for you guys that are kind enough to read along!
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  4. Rhode trip

    Rhode trip guided by voices Supporter

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    Saturday, June 2nd
    The Bridge Hotel had great parking, a big, grassy yard surrounded by a high wall. We had to walk around the block to get in the gate at the back. Rode 'em around to the front to pack up.

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    I was surprised to find out there was no petrol station in Helmsdale, and we ended up having to backtrack north on the A9 to get gas; then we rode the A9 south, past Helmsdale, and turned off at Brora. We followed a narrow valley through the hills. A round tower rises out of the yellow gorse along the way.

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    A huge stone barn... industrial looking with the tall smokestack.

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    A narrow ravine cut into the hillside.

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    Loch Brora seems like a series of lakes that follow the valley north.

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    A quiet cove with a few cottages. All very idyllic. The loch was like a looking glass the whole way we rode. It's actually all one lake with an undulating shoreline...wide here... then narrow, then wide again... as the contours of the valley allowed, I guess.

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    After Loch Brora, the route arched back towards the southwest, following Strath Brora. Through close mown fields and over cattle guards...

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    Met up with A839, which we followed down to meet the A9 again.

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    Over Loch Fleet on the A9 bridge, and then we turned off along the shoreline on a single track road. Loch Fleet is what I'd call a bay...open mouthed to the ocean. Very different than Loch Brora.... a freshwater lake. You could smell the sea air... with the Loch on one side of the narrow road... and a long line of tractors coming the other way.

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    They're waving 'cause we pulled over to let them pass by.

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    It's The Annual Charity Tractor Run for Chest, Heart, and Stroke Scotland. There's over 100 tractors out for a ride. They make TW200's look fast. This could take a while!

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    We inched along from one passing place to the next … gaggles of tractors passed.

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    Loch Fleet on one side.... low tide from the look of it....

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    Tractors on the other.....

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    Loch....

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    Tractors. These guys were riding sweep.

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    Loch Fleet is known for its wildlife. Harbour seals swim lazily in the channel.

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    More seals lounging on a sandbar...

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    A Grey Heron stalks its prey in the shallows. This is the tallest bird in Britain.

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    The other side of the shore road.... the remains of Skelbo Castle keeping a silent watch over the waters of the Loch. Viking raiders once prowled these shores. This old castle has played many a role in Scottish history.
    'Little is known about the early history of Skelbo Castle but it was probably raised during the reign of David I (1124–53). That King actively encouraged Normans and Flemings to settle in the more unruly parts of Scotland as they brought their castle building skills with them and helped strengthen Royal authority. The castle was a Norman style 'Motte & Bailey' design. Whether Skelbo was raised by a foreign lord or a local native imitating continental designs is not known. However, a rebellion in nearby Moray had been brutally suppressed in 1130 and it is possible Skelbo Castle was founded shortly after. By 1211 it was in the hands of William de Moravia, owner of nearby Duffus Castle and therefore it is possible Skelbo Castle was raised by his father, Freskin, who was a Flemish mercenary.
    In 1290 Skelbo Castle hosted Royal Commissioners on their way north to Wick in order to meet Margaret, The Maid of Norway as she returned to Scotland to claim the throne. However, whilst staying at Skelbo, the Commissioners received news of the death of the young Princess starting a chain of events that would lead to the Wars of Scottish Independence. The Moravia family supported the English cause during the early years of this war prompting Robert the Bruce to burn the castle in 1308.
    It was perhaps the attack of 1308 that prompted the rebuilding of the Keep in stone for this is tentatively dated to the early fourteenth century. The curtain wall was also rebuilt in stone enclosing a triangular shaped area which would have hosted all the ancillary buildings associated with such a site. A gatehouse occupied the south-east corner and the entire site was surrounded by a ditch.
    In 1350 the then owner of Skelbo Castle - Kenneth de Moravia, Earl of Sutherland - acquired Duffus Castle by marriage. Skelbo seems to have remained an important residence but substantial building work at his new acquisition led to that site becoming his primary seat. Skelbo later passed to Thomas Kynnard through his marriage to the daughter of Walter Murray (the Moravia family having now assumed this as their surname). The Kynnard family held it until 1529 when it was sold to William Sutherland who made a number of upgrades to the structure.
    A new house was built within the bailey in the seventeenth century with the former castle buildings effectively abandoned. By the early eighteenth century it was occupied by Eric Sutherland, a younger son of Lord Kenneth Sutherland of Duffus. Eric supported the 1715 Jacobite rebellion and accordingly Skelbo was confiscated after that uprising was defeated. Thereafter the castle drifted into ruin but in 1996 it was purchased by the Russian artist and billionaire Mikhail de Buar who allegedly acquired it to gain the associated title of ‘Baron’. He took little interest in the site and it required intervention by Historic Scotland to stabilise the structure.' The "Baron" has since passed away, without a will, and his estate is embroiled in lawsuits amongst his heirs. http://www.castlesfortsbattles.co.uk/highland/skelbo_castle.html


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    After Skelbo, the road turned inland, through fields of yellow-blooming rapeseed, down to the old town of Dornoch.

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    The old castle there is now a hotel.

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    An enterprising young piper was plying his trade.

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    The streets were lined with little shops.

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    I don't know why, but this trip we seemed to get a snack almost everyday.... not something we normally do. I probably gained 10 lbs on our trip to Scotland. We ducked into a coffee shop...

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    Then we strolled a bit of Dornoch to walk off the rocky road brownie and the little tart. :lol3 (Mrs Trip kept up, though)

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    We left Dornoch and rode down to meet the A9 again, and we crossed over the bridge on Dornoch Firth. Got off the A9 immediately after, and found ourselves following a green lane through the edge of Morangie Forest.

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    The fields rolled down, looking out to the Firth beyond.

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    Back across the A9 a few miles beyond.... and into the Royal Burgh of Tain.

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    South of town. The fields look out over Moray Firth.

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    Coming into the village of Nigg.

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    Nigg Hall.

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    We're traveling this way for the ferry, but discover that Nigg is a very interesting place.

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    We wander into an old graveyard. What is the 'Nigg Stone'?

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    There's no one around, but the church is open. We go inside....

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    Through the Nave. Stark, like the congregational church I went to as a boy. Then down a few steps into another room. The Nigg Stone. Supported by bespoke arms of brushed stainless steel. LED lights sparkle. A wide metal railing keeps it just out of reach.

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    It turns out that the 'Nigg Stone' is one of the treasures of Celtic civilization. Carved in the 8th century, its a detailed Pictish cross and one of the most elaborate carved stones surviving from early medieval Europe.
    'It is now displayed, restored to its original proportions, in a room inside the parish church. It bears an elaborately decorated cross in high relief on the 'front' and a figural scene on the reverse. This scene is extremely complicated and made more difficult to interpret by deliberate defacement. Among the depictions are two Pictish symbols: an eagle above a Pictish Beast, a sheep, the oldest evidence of a European triangular harp, and hunting scenes. Scholars interpret the scene as representing a story of the biblical King David. The carvings on the cross side show close similarities to the contemporary high crosses of Iona. These works may indeed have been created by the same 'school' of carvers, working for different patrons.'
    It's very impressive, not least because of the contemporary setting for it inside the old church.

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    The back side. The stone was broken, and a section is missing. It has been infilled to restore it to its original shape.

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    The stone was originally located in a corner of the churchyard. The church itself was built in 1626.... but on the site of worship dating back at least 1200 years... the stone itself was carved in the 700's... well before the general adoption of Christianity in the region. It's considered probable that the site itself was used by Irish monks who came to introduce the faith.

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    There are more mysteries to the old church, though.

    It was in this church in 1739 that a religious revival began which was eventually to influence much of the north of Scotland. Large numbers of people met for weekly prayer meetings and a prominent part was taken by leading lay preachers known, in Gaelic, as Na Daoine (The Men). Some of them were thought to have supernatural powers, prophesying and seeing visions. The most prominent of The Men of Nigg was Donald Roy who died in 1774 at the age of 105.

    Outside in the churchyard is the Cholera Stone, dating from the cholera epidemic of 1832. One of the elders, on coming out of the church, saw a cloud of vapour hovering above the ground. He believed it to be a cloud of cholera, threw a blanket or cloth over it and placed this large stone on top to keep it from escaping.

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    And finally legend has it that for many years an illegal whiskey still was kept in the space under the pulpit...hidden from the authorities. We left the old church and continued south, climbing up the Hill of Nigg.

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  5. Rhode trip

    Rhode trip guided by voices Supporter

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    Once we hit the top of the hill, the waters of Nigg Bay spread out in front of us.

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    The bay is the home of an Oil Fabrication Yard, as well as a pipeline terminal bringing oil ashore from drilling sites in the Moray Firth.

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    We rode through a farmyard, then the road widened again as we headed downhill. It got steep.... REALLY steep as we went over that edge beyond.

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    ...and it was a quick, photo-less slide down to the ferry dock.

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    The Nigg Ferry is also known as The King’s Ferry – it's the route taken by King James IV of Scotland when on pilgrimage to the shrine of St Duthac at Tain, doing so at least 18 times in the years between 1493 to 1513. It's at the foot of Nigg Hill, whose bluffs mark the entrance to Cromarty Firth... considered one of the finest natural harbours in Europe.

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    The ferry itself is arguably the smallest ferry in Britain, carrying 2 cars and up to 16 passengers the short distance to Cromarty.

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    The cars have to back off the ferry when they arrive.

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    It's snug with the bikes and the cars on board... the second car is barely on....

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    There's a sea-level view of the oil rigs...

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    The Fabrication Yard is making wind turbine towers as well these days...

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    It's just a short ride across to Cromarty.

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    Back the cars off, and up the ramp.

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    Then we followed them off.

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    Cromarty is much more of a town than Nigg that was mostly farms. We rode up to the headland above the town.

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    Looking across to the Hill of Nigg. These matching headlands are known as the Sutors of Cromarty... 147 meters high on the north side, and 140 from where we stand.
    The Sutors stand guard over the firth, and many stories have been told about them. Sutor is the Scots word for shoemaker, and one story tells of two giant shoemakers, the sutors, who used the two cliffs as their workbenches, and tossed their tools to and fro between one another.

    Both the North Sutor and South Sutor carry the remains of substantial military gun emplacements, coastal batteries built in the early 20th century to protect and defend the naval anchorage in the firth, which saw service during both World War I and, to a lesser degree, World War II, but was abandoned by the 1950s. Built before the outbreak of World War I, this protection included elaborate defences to protect the firth from U-Boats, including not only the batteries, but a Boom Defence and Minefield, together with Lookout and Observation Posts, and Searchlight Batteries.

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    Far below, a swarm of sea birds are drawn by something in the water.... a school of fish, perhaps...

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    Looking west, over the town of Cromarty.

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    Back through town, then south west, on a diagonal traverse across what's known as The Black Isle.

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    One of the little towns along the way.... it could be Fortrose... it could be Belmaduthy…

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    We crossed the B9169... the road south to the Muir of Ord.

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    ...down to the shore of the Cromarty Firth, and around the end to Conon Bridge.

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    ...and into the town of Dingwall. We had to ride around a bit to find our B&B. I stopped to admire another WWI monument...this one topped with a tough bronze Tommy about to poke someone with his bayonet.

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    Eventually we found the place... The Bed and Breakfast was one of a wall of rowhouses just off the center of town. Dingwall is not far from Helmsdale if you follow the A9 highway.... but we'd had an interesting day wandering back and forth along it......
    mathdl, Saso, yehaaa6 and 4 others like this.
  6. Blader54

    Blader54 Long timer

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    The assemblage of buildings with the smokestack near Brora, was, if I'm not mistaken, the Clynelish distillery. The whisky it produces is highly sought after for blends but they do now produce a single malt of their own. And you were in Tain! Home of the Glenmorangie disillery, whose bottles proudly proclaim the whisky to be the product of "the 16 men of Tain." Another wonderful chapter in this fine, fine report! Thanks again for letting us catch a ride with you! And thanks to glenn, below, for catching my 18 for 16 error in my original post! Good on ya!
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  7. glenn2926

    glenn2926 Been here awhile

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    I think you’ll find it’s the 16 men of Tain. It’s my favourite whisky.
    Brilliant report. I ride this area at least once a year. Never get bored of it. Thanks.
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  8. TheAdmiral

    TheAdmiral Long timer

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    I'm kind of surprised at the size of the ferry myself. Hey, it works! :thumb

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  9. Blader54

    Blader54 Long timer

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    @glenn2926.....ah, but of course you're right! I misread the age statement for the tag line! Should have posted before indulging! Fixed now!
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  10. Rhode trip

    Rhode trip guided by voices Supporter

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    Thanks, Blader54... it didn't even occur to me that it could be a distillery. I think we went by the backside, and I don't remember a sign, but I did a google image search and you are absolutely correct... it's the Clynelish distillery! I had been wondering why they needed that big smokestack...now I know.

    Thanks, Glen! I know nothing about whisky, but I bet I could learn if I rode that area more often....we came across other distilleries the next day... there's sure a lot of them!

    Thanks, Admiral! It must be tough to make money with only 2 cars and a few walkers. Pretty cool, though. I don't know about this one, but the turntable ferry to Skye was operated by a non-profit group. It had a little shop selling tee shirts and other souvenirs to supplement the fares.
  11. Rhode trip

    Rhode trip guided by voices Supporter

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    Sunday, June 3rd

    We left Dingwall...heading in the wrong direction.
    It wasn't until you could see the bridge taking the A9 across Cromarty Firth that I started to realize.

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    Had to round the roundabout at the foot of the bridge, and head south, back the way we came.

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    Aahhh! That's better. We picked our way south through some back roads.

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    And went through Beauly, where we crossed over the river of the same name.

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    Then we rode in a loopy, winding route through Kirkhill, Easter Moniack, down to South Clunes.

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    Through Glen Convinth and The Aird.

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    Misty this morning... hanging in the glens and dense within the woods....

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    Low clouds lay on the hilltops.

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    Flying through a dark pine forest.

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    Into the city of Inverness, so we can cross the bridges where the Caledonian Canal and the River Ness flow into Moray Firth... on their way from Loch Ness to the sea.

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    And then across Drummossie Muir, near the site of the Battle of Culloden in 1746.

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    This was the final fight of the Jacobean Rising, and was the last major battle fought on the island of Britain. Bonnie Prince Charlie and his Highland clansmen made a bold and misguided charge across the boggy ground of Drummossie Moor and into the teeth of the English troops. Some 1500 Scotsmen died that day, and their dreams of the restoration of King James to the throne died with them. The aftermath of the Battle of Cullodon brought a crackdown on the Highlands and all things to do with the Clan system...and the Highland way of life. Thousands of Scots were killed or imprisoned. Many thousands more were driven from their homes, fleeing to America and the South Pacific. The Duke of Cumberland, the government commander, earned the name “Butcher Cumberland” because of his role in the wanton destruction of the Highlands by his forces.

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    Strathnain… the valley of the River Nain... crosses eastbound, down to the town of Nain and Moray Firth beyond.

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    The valley is spanned by the Nain Viaduct, an impressive structure built in 1898 of sandstone. It's 28 arches, each 50 feet wide, except the 100 foot arch over the river, cross the wide valley from one hillside to another. At 1800 feet, it's the longest viaduct in Scotland. Heck, even the sheep is impressed!

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    Old farmyard. I liked the potted garden.

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    An over-the-shoulder shot... riding through more pine forest.

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    a rocky brook tumbles below...

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    We crossed a "ford". The water is flowing beneath the road... but at times of high water, it will flow right over the top.

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    I don't think I'd ride it if the water was that high...there'd be a pretty strong current with that much flow...

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    Forests and fields.... this area is very different than the moors.

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    The roadsides were painted with rhododendron in bloom.

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    Over the River Findhorn

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    Ran into some gravel roads. There was a couple of detours in this area, a bridge out on the River Divie…in another spot, a washout... we had to backtrack and find another way.

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    Old Stone Barns.

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    At Dunphail, we turned onto the old road to Tomnamoon. They'd been logging in these woods. We rode past an old cottage, then uphill on a gravel road.

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    The way then turned downhill, hugging the side of the hill. The road was washed out a bit, rutted with loose patches of rubble. Crossed an old bridge, green with moss.

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    By this point, we were pretty deep into what was probably Altyre Woods... the remains of an old estate. We met some walkers.... an older couple who were very interested in Lynn and her bike... they talked for quite a while, while I rode ahead.

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    Meanwhile I met 2 women on horses... they were not real keen on us being there... I had the bike turned off, talking to them, and they decided to take a cross trail. We rode on through the woods.

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    The trees thinned. The road ran through a series of fields.

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    The roads were dirt all the way to Rafford...

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    Where we met B9010... turned off towards Pluscarden… past the Rafford Parish church.

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    This road eventually met back up with B9010, and we followed it into the city of Elgin, our goal for the day. We had hoped to meet a couple of guys from the ADVScotland site, but between the detours and the wandering about, and that it took us a while to find Cooper Park and the 2018 Elgin Motofun event once we reached Elgin, we missed them. The fair was winding down by the time we arrived.

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    We stayed in a B&B on the outskirts of town. We walked through quiet streets in search of a restaurant.

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    Sunday evening, we ended in a pub. Then walked back to our lodgings past the Elgin Cathedral... the grounds closed for the night.

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    Construction began in 1224... but the cathedral burned again and again....in 1270, in 1390, and again in 1402. After the fire of 1390, the bishop Alexander Bur wrote to the king, seeking reparations....it was the king's brother who had burned it in a violent dispute. "my church was the particular ornament of the fatherland, the glory of the kingdom, the joy of strangers and incoming guests, the object of praise and exaltation in other kingdoms because of its decoration, by which it is believed that God was properly worshipped; not to mention its high bell towers, its venerable furnishings and uncountable jewels." Robert III granted him an annuity of £20.
    By 1560, the cathedral was abandoned, and fell into ruin over the course of the intervening centuries. There is a surprisingly extensive Wiki page on this cathedral, with a great deal of detail about it's history: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elgin_Cathedral
    But we just peered through the gate....

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  12. jgormley

    jgormley Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,180
    Location:
    Lincoln, RI
    Hi Jim,

    Do have a spot track to see where you have been?
    I imagine it will cover quite a bit of ground...'
    Have you added up miles traveled?
    Rhode trip likes this.
  13. Rhode trip

    Rhode trip guided by voices Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,803
    Location:
    Coventry, RI
    They say goldfish have no memory
    I guess their lives are much like mine
    And the little plastic castle
    Is a surprise every time.
    -Ani Defranco

    Unfortunately, you're dealing with people here who lack the foresight to note their mileage before they start riding. Every. Single. Time.
    So, no, I don't know how far we've ridden.
    Here is the link to our Spot track for Scotland: https://spotwalla.com/tripViewer.php?id=18e8a5afc74d55ac83&hoursPast=0&showAll=yes
    You can zoom in on that map if you care to. You can also click on 'Looking for Brigadoon' at the top of the page, find 'adjustments', choose 'all', and click on update map.... it will give a more detailed track, although still at 10 minute intervals. I do also have GPS tracks if anyone is interested.
    We flew into Cork, Ireland on May 16th. Flew home from Edinburgh on June 10th.
    ben2go likes this.
  14. jgormley

    jgormley Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,180
    Location:
    Lincoln, RI
    Thanks for the gpx...
    Here is what basecamp came up with...

    Scotland May June 2018.jpg

    Interesting... 2,203 miles and 140,695 ft of elevation changes...
    ben2go, B10Dave and Rhode trip like this.
  15. ben2go

    ben2go I am Ben! Hear me snore!

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2011
    Oddometer:
    7,162
    Location:
    Upstate SC USA
    I don't do the trip mileage thing on long trips. On 3 to 4 day trips I can usually remember my starting mileage an give and edumakaded guess.

    That's pretty cool. Is that just for Mr. and Mrs. RT's Scottish journey?
    Rhode trip likes this.
  16. TheAdmiral

    TheAdmiral Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,675
    Location:
    Frosty Hollow, Idaho
    Awesomeness!
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    Rhode trip likes this.
  17. Rhode trip

    Rhode trip guided by voices Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,803
    Location:
    Coventry, RI
    Yes, just this trip, Cork to Edinburgh. It's more miles than I would have guessed even with our circuitous route.
    Map courtesy of jgormley:
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    Pretty cool and it shows the actual route ridden...detours and back-tracking included.

    Thanks Admiral. You will be very interested when we get to Edinburgh! - stay tuned!
    ben2go, Turkeycreek and TheAdmiral like this.
  18. jgormley

    jgormley Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,180
    Location:
    Lincoln, RI
    It looks like you tried to go west at Lock Bienn...
    but could not get through...

    Did you run out of road there?
    Rhode trip likes this.
  19. Essbee

    Essbee Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2009
    Oddometer:
    73
    Location:
    Durban, South Africa
    This RR is mind blowing....one stunningly beautiful landscape pic after another....and another...and and and! :D The trouble you have gone to to post so many pics with such informative writings is admirable. Thanks so much! You deserved the good weather!!!! Every ray of it.
    zookster, Rhode trip and TheAdmiral like this.
  20. Rhode trip

    Rhode trip guided by voices Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,803
    Location:
    Coventry, RI
    Yes, that was Glen Affrick… what once was a road is just a hiking trail now....there was no way through those mountains in the distance.

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    Geez, Essbee… Thank you very much. It's fun going back and re-living the ride... but it does take alot of time.... I'm glad you're enjoying it!