When To Turn Around to See What Happened to Your Buddy?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Ray916MN, Oct 15, 2021.

  1. Ray916MN

    Ray916MN Dim Mak

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    I was riding TN 421 (aka The Snake) yesterday and came around a corner and found a rider lying face down in the roadway with his bike laying on his legs. I was checking him out when a car came by. Got them to call for an ambulance. 79 year old guy. No life threatening injuries as best as I could tell. Conscious, but clearly hurting. Got him comfortable. First responders arrived in about 5 minutes and I was on the scene for another 10 minutes. Guy was following a friend on a BMW. As I was getting ready to leave 2 riders who were down at the Shady Valley Country Store came by and I stopped them and told them if they saw a BMW rider stopped on the side of the road to tell him his buddy had been in an accident. By the time I left the friend still hadn't shown up. I did see the ambulance and sheriff going to accident and I didn't see a BMW rider going the opposite way on 421 till maybe 3 miles further down 421 after seeing the sheriff.

    Is it bad when the first responders, ambulance and sheriff get to your riding buddy before you figure out you should turn around to see what happened to him?
    #1
  2. mikes'gs

    mikes'gs BOTTOM DWELLER Supporter

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    1st... apparently they were'nt that good of friends
    #2
  3. rd400racer

    rd400racer Long timer

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    :photog OK, that was a spit take:D

    And I think this thread would be more appropriate in The Perfect Line section.
    #3
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  4. Sideroadrod

    Sideroadrod Been here awhile

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    I was taught that it is proper etiquette to always keep a look out for the rider behind you in your mirrors. if you suspect that something may be wrong for a variety of reasons, you should pull over and wait and or then turn around. This can obviously vary depending on the familiarity of the riders in the group and or any coms they may be running.
    Riding off road or dualsport, my group of riding friends always wait up at any forks on the trails so that no one gets lost or left behind.

    Cheers SSR
    #4
  5. oldoval

    oldoval Pleasant as fuck

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    Jesus, I'm supposed to babysit the riders behind me? This is why I ride alone.

    I'm afraid I'll never make Road Captain.

    .
    #5
  6. mikes'gs

    mikes'gs BOTTOM DWELLER Supporter

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    it's not what it's cracked up to be..
    #6
  7. Lead Wrist

    Lead Wrist Mehr Gelände Weniger Straße

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    Ouch... There are some group ride rules which rider ahead of the fallen one clearly didn't follow... :bluduh
    #7
  8. mrbreeze

    mrbreeze I keep blowing down the road Supporter

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    Crashing and ruining the ride for the others in your group is so inconsiderate!

    I'm just kidding, of course. I was involved in similar situation once... a group of 4 of us went for a ride in the Virgina mountains. We were all strangers, we met at a rally... so anyway, one of the guys was a real hot shoe and felt the need to show everyone that he was the fastest. Second guy simply couldn't let it go, and third guy was pretty much a newbie. So we get into the mountains and rider 1 and 2 pass and take off. Newbie was trying to keep up. This made me #4, and I could see that #3 was struggling, so I held back so as not to pressure him to go faster. He eventually went into the ditch, and we sat there on the side of the road for 3 hours before help arrived. This was before cell phones were common. Rider 1 and 2 did eventually come back.
    #8
  9. blk-betty

    blk-betty bam-a-lam Supporter

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    Maybe yesterday, there was no friend riding with.

    79 year old in an accident....possibly confused.

    Just speculation but I image most all of us here if riding with a friend, a real friend, not a tag along, would check his mirrors and if said friend was no where to be seen, would go back and check.
    #9
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  10. kraven

    kraven Hegelian Scum

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    I tend to pull off the road ASAP when I lose them, and then if they don't zip by or stop with me I go back to look.
    Back when I first started riding one of my friends got yeeted off his bike by a car and then flat spun to a stop in the road. He was 17 then and he's still getting gravel working its way out of his skin 20 some years later.
    One of the old guys I know who still rides has had multiple get offs the last few years and swears he'll yeet himself off a cliff before he goes to a nursing home. He rides in a group, but nearly every one of those old guys has trouble seeing, get confused about where they are, over correct for simple situations, etc. They're all over 70, btw. One of them got left like that because the guy ahead of him just quit watching and was laser focused on riding fast to keep up with a kid on a sport tour bike.
    We're in the middle of what wellness nerds call the silver tsunami. We have a bunch of riders getting old and continuing to ride with their buddies. We'll likely see more of what you encountered. They just want to ride bikes with their friends as long as they can.
    #10
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  11. T-88

    T-88 Been here awhile

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    I suppose if you ride with genuine friends like I do, everybody looks out for everybody else, just like you would if your wife, brother or one of your kids was following you.

    If you have no friends, of course you look out only for Number 1.

    Tim
    #11
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  12. oldoval

    oldoval Pleasant as fuck

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    PM me your address and I'll get it headed your way.

    [​IMG]
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  13. dduelin

    dduelin Prone To Wander, Lord, I Feel It

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    That was my thought. Lots of assumptions and judgements above.
    #13
  14. advmgm

    advmgm Long timer

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    I agree with you.
    If you are riding with someone, then you check on them too.
    My riding partners are my friends so I watch out for them like they are.
    Particularly on a road like The Dragon.
    #14
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  15. T-88

    T-88 Been here awhile

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    LOL. We don't need no stinkin' Road Captain(s). :)

    Tim
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  16. JRMAL

    JRMAL Long timer

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    I will be 70 next year. My main riding buddy is nearing 75.
    The last few years I've been routing rides that are not fast and take the back way. We both ride cruisers.

    I've noticed he's not so sharp anymore (had to yell at him when he was going to go over a curb after gassing up and lagging behind and holding up traffic).
    I'm thinking of selling my bike so I don't have to ride with him anymore. Hoping I save his life from crashing his bike.

    I don't have the heart to tell him that he should give it up.
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  17. T-88

    T-88 Been here awhile

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    If he's truly a good friend, you WILL tell him it's time to hang up his bike keys and reminisce about the great rides you had together.

    It's sad, but inevitable that there comes a time when we have to stop riding, and eventually, cease driving.

    We don't want any of our friends or family to possibly injure themselves or anybody else. Imagine how any of us would feel if we or our family members got hurt just because some old git thought he was still capable of handling his 835 lb Gold Wing, lost control, and hit one of us.

    Tim
    #17
  18. jmq3rd

    jmq3rd .

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    I ride with my 72 year old dad and brother, street, dirt, and dual sport. I almost always lead. We intentionally spread out, so it's normal for me to not see them in the mirrors. On the dirt, I slow down or stop if I haven't seen anybody in the last couple of minutes. On dual sport or street, it's more like 5 to 10 minutes. Also at any turns I make sure I can see both of them.

    Part of us spreading out is for safety- if we stay together, there is a higher chance that one of us will "push" to keep up with the rider in front. If we get a curve or two apart, that doesn't happen..
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  19. wellcraft

    wellcraft Long timer

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    I ride in small groups and I'm normally the ride leader and while it is a challenge I keep an eye on everyone riding behind me and I always make sure the last rider is someone I trust so nobody gets left behind and if someone goes down there's help right there that can stop and lend assistance. To continue to ride and not notice your buddy isn't behind you for miles and miles and miles is inexcusable.
    #19
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  20. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Long timer

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    Rather agree with @blk-betty, sounds like there wasn’t actually another rider. Being old didn’t help, but simply crashing like that tends to confuse one, regardless of age.

    Anyhow, simply being aware of the others, and not letting them disappear into the background is usually quite enough. Pull over and wait. Just a minute or two is usually enough for them to show up. If after a few minutes they still haven’t shown, head back.
    #20
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