which BDR you guys recommend?

Discussion in 'Americas' started by tk1250gsa, May 23, 2020.

  1. tk1250gsa

    tk1250gsa Been here awhile

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    hi
    I'm planning to so 2 states BDR on middle of June and original plan was AZ-UT but thinking to change to UT-ID or UT-CO.
    How do you guys think? i'm going by my self. is it bit too much to do 2 bdr as solo rider?
    I ride local dirt usually and this is first multiple days bdr.
    Thanks.
    #1
  2. Tricepilot

    Tricepilot Bailando Con Las Estrellas Super Moderator Super Supporter

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    I've done the Colorado BDR and the Continental Divide Ride from Silver City New Mexico to Steamboat in CO. Two weeks from today doing the New Mexico BDR. I only say this to give you the idea I might have an idea of what you propose to tackle.

    There is really no way on the internet to give you a serious response without talking to you and getting to know your abilities, bike, risk management profile, and age/health. Total respect for the idea of going solo, which by concept definition has many benefits but comes with the corresponding risks.

    Your audience here has no idea of your experience or what bike you're taking and how you are packing. Going by your by line you have a 1250 GS Adventure? This is the bike you're proposing to take? Three weeks ago I did Western New Mexico and Eastern Arizona on my '15 GSA, with some 150 miles of dirt in New Mexico on it. In two weeks in New Mexico on the BDR I'll be on a KTM 500. Huge difference.

    May I suggest your audience might benefit from some more details as to type of bike and your personal travel experience, to give you the best response.
    #2
  3. tk1250gsa

    tk1250gsa Been here awhile

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    Thanks for very thoughtful reply and sorry for insufficient information.
    yes I'm planning to do with my 19 gsa and I haven't done any bdr so far. I do have riding experience for 6 years and done cross country and multiple time of road trip with gsa last year. and have plenty of camping experience. i'm 36 and I can say I'm pretty fit. working out every day.
    I've taken off road class twice (basic and advance) mostly ride in NJ pinebarren area which is sandy a lot of whoop.
    I wish I can have some riding buddy but it's kinda hard to fine someone for that long vacation and also I'm freelancer so my schedule not really expectable.
    And kinda same thing I worry cause even I fit, traveling multi off road trip with gsa by alone isn't easy.
    Thanks!
    #3
  4. Tricepilot

    Tricepilot Bailando Con Las Estrellas Super Moderator Super Supporter

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    I know what I want to say. However, I'll take pause and let others chime in and see if they're thinking like I'm thinking.
    #4
  5. tk1250gsa

    tk1250gsa Been here awhile

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    Haha yea I feel ya. I know I need more experience. I might shift my plan to 2-3 days pb400 course ridng my self with all the gear as practice and pre run. And do NEBDR. This year and going next year with full confidence. May be with lighter bike!
    #5
  6. TripleTriples

    TripleTriples Long timer

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    Just get out there and do it if you want to. Pick one of the routes that stays close to paved roads and you can always bail if it gets too dicey.

    I wouldn't get into anything rough of you're going solo, but it sounds like you've got plenty of seat time to me.
    #6
  7. marret

    marret Transient

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    The MABDR is not difficult technically. Mostly dirt/gravel or paved roads. I remember one part a couple hundred yards that was rocky. If wet though, some areas can be very slippery. There are a few spots with easier or harder options. Lots of options for alternate routes.
    #7
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  8. 95Monster

    95Monster Long timer

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    The MABDR is a beautiful route and easy to bail out of if you find things too muddy or wet.
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  9. cyclopathic

    cyclopathic Long timer

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    Here some info from ridebdr site:
    We can help you a bit by ranking the existing BDR’s from most difficult to least difficult. Here is the list: CA, AZ, UT, CO, WA, NM, ID, MA. So CABDR South is the most difficult especially if you ride the expert sections and Mid Atlantic BDR is the easiest in general terms. Although MABDR is the easiest there are still a few cha..

    Agree with @Tricepilot doing BDR solo on GSA is not wise. Expect to pick bike up at some point. There was a day on CABDR when I picked bike 6 times.. then I stopped counting but I think it was another 5 before the day was over. It was a long day first 4 times it was without unloading
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  10. black 8

    black 8 coddiwompling motographer

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    ^^^ +1

    I did the CABDR solo as my first BDR since it's practically in my backyard... I did it on a Yamaha XT250 just for that same exact reason; picking up the bike... I'd rather pick up 270 lbs+ than 550 lbs+ camping gear... not to mention if your leg gets caught under all that weight... I had a low side in deep sand and my left leg was pinned under the bike but I was able to budge the bike enough to free myself...

    Everybody drops their bike off-road whether they like to admit it or not... even the best of us; something as simple as an off camber situation where you tip the bike over at zero speed or misjudging the terrain...

    Nothing says you can't do it solo; you just have to mitigate some of the possibilities you might encounter out there... BTW get yourself a Spot or inReach tracking device if you already don't have...

    Have fun out there and be safe..
    #10
  11. jonz

    jonz Miles are my mantra Supporter

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    With a big 'ol GSA, I'd say maybe ride the Idaho BDR north and come back south on the Continental Divide Ride which is easy IF DRY. Mid June, you might have to bypass a high pass or two due to snow.
    #11
  12. tk1250gsa

    tk1250gsa Been here awhile

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    Thank you all replies.
    I understand it’s risky as solo rider with gsa but bit hard to project my self to how much is difficult level.
    hum.. been watching a lot of AZ , UT CO CA video to get idea how difficult is so far looks ok.
    I’m pretty comfortable with sand since where I usually ride area is all sandy. Only thing I worried is rocky terrain.
    #12
  13. cyclopathic

    cyclopathic Long timer

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    From what I understand COBDR isn't bad unless you decide to do Black Bear pass and moondust on section before last or two? It is a risky business to judge route by videos. From personal experience CABDR was very different from videos I watched; sand on section 2 was deeper than anyone mentioned. Plus weather threw a wild card Hunter pass was snowed in.

    As for sand vs rocks you have traction on rocks but it isn't a question of what is easier or harder; it is a question of picking up bike when it goes down. If you are a strong guy and lifting GSA solo in imperfect conditions is no prob then go for it. BDRs main routes are big bike friendly and many expert sections has been done on big bike.
    #13
  14. Tricepilot

    Tricepilot Bailando Con Las Estrellas Super Moderator Super Supporter

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    @cyclopathic Black Bear isn't a part of the COBDR. You probably already know that. While doing the COBDR I camped at City Park in Telluride. I took a scouting opportunity and rode up towards Black Bear to the one way cut off (the pass is downhill only), parked the 500, and hiked up to the famous "steps". I took it all in, the challenge, the views, the cascading water etc. I sat there. Point numero uno is that I decided I didn't want to try it (not growing up on dirt bikes) because of my skill level and numero dos I didn't want to have to loop around again to once again go up Ophir Pass twice to do the published COBDR route. In other words, I didn't have the skills, and even if I did, and this is a timing point, it would have been too much of a big burrito to try to swallow in one day. Remember. I was on a 500. Only the pros (and I'm sure this post will lure one or two of them to post) will descend Black Bear on a loaded GSA. In other words, my Risk Management Spidy Senses said "watch it on YouTube with a beer in your hand". Lol.

    @jimmex is a Black Bear pro, but he knows me and he knows what I'm saying here.
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  15. cyclopathic

    cyclopathic Long timer

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    I haven't looked at COBDR route yet but didn't expect Black Bear be on main route.. that would be a killer.

    As for descend the friend of mine did it on Vstrom in group of 5 they took time to get off the bike and safeguard each other on Steps.. he managed without dropping bike. That cliff on the side is very intimidating for sure! Take it away and it's not as bad. I might have been on roads as intimidating.. can't really say as I was not looking that way!


    #15
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  16. DittyBag

    DittyBag A bag of dirty stuff

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    As others have said, if you can't pick your bike up when you are TIRED then don't go alone. But it sounds like you have that well covered (plus those bikes don't go all the way to the ground anyway :D). I'd only ride them alone, but that's just me.

    I literally SUCK at riding and did the bottom half of UT and the CO, solo, on a Hypermotard. I fell off a lot on side trips like Imogene and Mosquito, but not on the BDRs (except Lockhart). I quit at the half of UT because it was just too hot. That's a great thing about them, you can jump off almost anywhere.

    Doing 2 will certainly test your stamina and mental dedication if you are alone. Enjoy.
    #16
  17. Dualsport Chic

    Dualsport Chic Long timer

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    If you are considering the NEBDR, I would highly suggest a riding buddy due to the size of your steed. Things in New England can get nasty fast with a little bit of precip. Mud on rocks with steep ledges litter the upper part of the route. Engine guards, bash plate and hand guards are a MUST in the upper sections of the route as you will drop the bike. The first three sections (starting in Hancock, NY) are more big bike friendly however.

    Good Luck and enjoy your journey.
    #17
  18. tk1250gsa

    tk1250gsa Been here awhile

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    Thanks reply.
    Yes I’m ok to pick up bike multiple times also those boxer help to mKe it east but on hill, If I fell on down side those boxer turn to open hell gate. Lol
    #18
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