Which first aid kit?

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Peanut_Buttery, Jan 27, 2020.

  1. Peanut_Buttery

    Peanut_Buttery Been here awhile

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    Talk to me about first aid kits.

    For road riding, which kit would you recommend? I was thinking of a small kit that fits in a tank bag.

    I’ve got up-to-date first aid certification, but am struggling to balance what would be useful kit vs. what’s small enough to carry conveniently.

    upload_2020-1-27_17-40-20.jpeg
    #1
  2. panfam007

    panfam007 Been here awhile

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  3. Boricua

    Boricua Long timer

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    Advanced first aid kits are totally useless if you don't know how to use what's in it. Even if you get training, if you don't practice training will get stale rather quickly. I rather stick to the basics.
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  4. panfam007

    panfam007 Been here awhile

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    Depends on what you need the kit for?
    Basic kits are a waste of money, just look at what's included. You can make up your own kit with Band-Aids and bandages of better quality.

    If you're looking to save a life after an accident, then an advanced kit is the way to go. This includes a good tourniquet, clot dressing, chest seals, nasal airway. These are all basic and easy to use without particular training.
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  5. engineman

    engineman Been here awhile Supporter

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    This looks like a good kit. There's plenty of info on youtube if you need to get some refresher on how to use some of the items. Nasal airway and tourniquet would be beneficial to have and know. During EMT training, our instructor mentioned that keeping an open airway can be difficult for an unconscious patient wearing a helmet, being able to insert an airway could save a life and you should be able to do it without removing the helmet. I've inserted a few and it's not that difficult if the pt is unconcious
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  6. Peanut_Buttery

    Peanut_Buttery Been here awhile

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  7. rider1150gsadv

    rider1150gsadv Long timer

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  8. Cam

    Cam Been here awhile

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    I avoid kits and keep it pretty simple. Below is what I carry and most of it is pretty simple. I date everything as it is replaced.

    Bandaid tough variety
    Hemostatic gauze such as Celox
    Gauze small roll
    Sterile pad assortment (2-4)
    Israeli bandage
    Steristrips
    Triangular bandage
    KT tape

    Dakin Solution in a brown bottle
    Saline in a squirt bottle
    Alcohol wipes

    Motrin, Aleve, Aspirin, Tylenol, Anti-Diarrhea, Antacid, Claritin medication
    Lidocane wipes or bottle
    Aloe vera wipes
    Hydrocortisone packs or spray
    Amerigel or Petroleum Jelly
    Cold pack

    Nitrile gloves
    Trauma shears
    Tweezers (good ones)
    Safety pins
    Duct tape
    Emergency blanket
    First aid cards
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  9. Bad Wolf

    Bad Wolf High functioning sociopath

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    First step is to figure out what you are using it for (road moto) and then consider the injuries and life support you are most likely to need (and qualified to offer).

    Common injuries you will deal with...debris in eyes, bug bites, burns, small cuts, sprains. More advanced talking bigger burns, road rash, bleeding, broken limbs.

    90% of the bigger stuff you will deal with is dependent on EMS coverage and response times and communications but you aren't as likely to be having to do field surgeries and advanced life support. There is a certain reality to the world out there. My last moto "first aid" response was watching a squid jump a curb and take out a road sign before landing in the median with his helmet popping off. He was gone and the "first aid" was trying to keep his friends and family under control.
    #9
  10. Blackhawk6d

    Blackhawk6d Adventurer

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    Purchased First Aid kits are overpriced and generally filled with "Stuff" that you probably won't need. The first thing you need to do is receive training. Then create a kit based on your level of training, the type of riding you do and who you generally ride with. For example, I generally don't ride with anyone who has severe allergic reactions or anaphylaxis. As a result, I carry Benedryl pills. Otherwise, I would carry Benedryl Liquid. I am not a fan of the "Rats" tourniquet, so I use the C.A.T. I have a SAM splint (easy to apply, lightweight and easy to store), A SWAT-T (compression tourniquet that can be used a couple of different manners), various bandages, Mole Skin, Motrin and Alertec. I also carry Latex gloves, Vaseline and and a HyperVent for a chest wound. My Tourniquet is kept in my jacket (for self application) and in my tank bag for applying to someone else.
    Vstrom First Aid Kit.jpg
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  11. zimm

    zimm KTM Duke 790

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    Buy a nice first aid bag (I like maxpedition pouches) and assemble your own to your skill level. If you google "IFAK" (Individual First Aid Kit) that will get you going. My training is old and expired so I don't bother with stuff like the nasal breathing tube, etc. but quick clot and an Israeli bandage plus lots of gauze, first aid wrap, etc plus the bandaid/boo boo stuff, and I also keep some travel meds like Imodium and Advil which can save a trip. Throw a small knife and flash light in there for good measure.
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  12. hamiamham

    hamiamham Been here awhile

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    I understand and I respect the opinion of those that dump on the pre-made kits. That being said, I think there is some value in the pre-made kits as they give you a good base from which to built on. Personally I like the Adventure Medical kits mainly as they offer what I feel is a great level of organization. Immediately upon unzipping the kit you see pockets organized by type of injury or use. I have added or replaced items with more "brand name" stuff and have put in additional items that are likely to be useful to me like a device to pull ticks.

    As for matching items in a kit with level of training, I respectfully disagree. If I have items in my kit that exceed my own knowledge but could be useful to someone on a more professional level I am happy to carry them.
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  13. 9Realms

    9Realms Drawn in by the complex plot

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    Nothing wrong with carrying some items that may be beyond your skill level, consider that someone else might stop at a accident scene that has the knowledge but isn't toting a kit.

    And don't rely on 911. Might not be cell service or you might be in a remote area they cannot immediately drive a service vehicle into.
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  14. solitary1

    solitary1 Been here awhile

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    ive used spservices.co.uk for a few years to build my own basic first aid kits,you can buy what you need or feel comfortable using,from plasters to surgical equipment.
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  15. firemanonabike

    firemanonabike Been here awhile

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    REI and other places have waterproof notepads and pens. That way you can keep track of the patient responses, meds, time of event, and comments as needed. I have a zip-lock bag for all that first aid stuff, I carry that in the right saddle bag.
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  16. PeterW

    PeterW Long timer

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    Something you know how to use.

    Mine has very little and it's just a small pre-made kit with some additions, largest item is a triangular bandage which has never been used. Band-aids, painkillers, antihistamine, tweezers, mild antibiotic cream, wipes and a tube of combo sun screen insect repellent which lives outside the kit all have been used. What's been used most (given away) are the mylar sleeping bags. So often now that I buy them in packs of ten. Mostly damaged cyclists waiting for ambulances and one girl found unconscious at the side of the road. Those have made a huge difference - shock is a real problem even in the heat we have here and just wrapping the mylar around someone will stop the shivering - which is a real bastard with broken bones in the equation.
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  17. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    I bought an empty fisrt aid case on aliexpress and filled it with stuff I felt is reasonable. I have a larger kit at home and borrow items from it on some trips. Put it back when I get home.
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  18. Exurban

    Exurban Been here awhile

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    As I’m now shopping for tourniquets, Israeli bandages, hemostatic gauze, etc. my thoughts...

    I hate these threads, damn you. I start out thinking, this is nuts carrying all this stuff I’ve never heard of. I’m not an EMT. Like I learned fifty years ago, I just need my Boy Scout kerchief and a stick, and I’m good to go. Then I start reading, researching, learning and rethinking with the end result that it makes me a better person. Thank you OP and others.

    If you make up your own kit, make sure the bag is orange, red or yellow preferably with a cross so a helper digging through your gear can easily find it. Put a Red Cross sticker or patch on the bag that contains the kit. Similarly, if you repackage any stuff in it make sure it’s conspicuously labeled.

    To avoid cluttering your kit, I’d leave OTC drugs, tweezers, maybe even bandaids, etc in my toiletries kit, not first aid. I look at first aid as immediate attention to avoid death or further severe bodily injury. You likely won’t be handing out aspirin at an accident scene. But that’s how my brain sorts things.

    Should probably use nitrile gloves, not latex.

    Your kit should include some basic instructions for CPR even if you’re up on your training. Someone else might need it.

    A possible reason people avoid learning first aid, aside from the scary circumstances when it is needed, is that it all seems so complicated. Not meaning to oversimplify and because of some of you, I’ve been reading about tourniquets, chest seals, hemostatic gauze, Israeli bandages and using them isn’t really that complicated. Instructions are all over the internet and the packages have them as well. You “just” have to recognize which method is best for a given injury and there’s only so many ways that happens.

    Sorry for the babbling. I’m in the middle of signing up for a first aid course.
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  19. sparkingdogg

    sparkingdogg Prisoner In Disguise

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    I keep my kit pretty basic.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
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  20. Blackhawk6d

    Blackhawk6d Adventurer

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    Yeah, they are nitrile gloves. I removed my older latex ones a while back and just still refer to them as latex. To be honest, in 20 years as an Firefighter/EMT for an Urban Fire Department I have run into like 3 people with Latex Allergies. And we still treated all 3 wearing latex gloves (before nitrile was as popular). Besides, if I am gloving up to treat someone, the latex allergy kinds takes second place to whatever I am treating.

    Carry as much as you like. Carry stuff that you are not trained to use if you like. The biggest thing you can do is get training. Many fire departments will give you CPR training for free, but your focus should be on First Aid & CPR. Preferably a Wilderness type of First Aid, but whatever you do, just get some skills.

    Kit color isn't high on my list, primarily because my gloves are kept in my kit and unless it's a kid, I am getting gloves on before my hands get bloody. However, it is a good idea for people that aren't used to getting a kit and taking it to treat someone. But then again in that moment, giving someone the keys to unlock your pannier and telling them to get your kit (the one marked appropriately) while you tend to someone having a real emergency... well adrenaline is a helluva thing. You gotta go back to your training. Get into the habit of taking your own kit with you. Set up a drill with your kids, wife(s) friends whatever where as soon as you ride home, they hand you a pre-printed out emergency and you have to react. Your first 2 steps should always be to obtain your kit while dialing 911. Then actually do it (simulate the 911 call though please). Go to your patient then treat the scenario. We do this quarterly for our ongoing training. If it works for us, it will work for you. Again, everything goes back to training.

    I like the CPR instructions idea, but again, I am getting my kit and if I have people willing to do things I generally step back and coordinate.

    If I go down you ask? Well you sure as hell shouldn't be digging through my gear looking for my first aid kit. You should be reacting based on your training.

    First Aid courses shouldn't be scary, but I can (kind of) understand what you are saying. Using a Hemo Gauze, Israeli bandage, RATS or CAT, a Hypervent, or even doing CPR can be a daunting thought. However, getting training should take some of those thoughts away. Then it's on you to keep your skills up. Volunteer for a Mass casualty drill, contact your local community college and ask if they have an EMS program and whether or not they need real life actors (you may or may not get a crappy box lunch out of it), contact your fire department and ask if they need actors for their ongoing training for their EMS program. Many departments actually have EMS only volunteers. Having someone perform EMS on you will help you learn just as much as taking a course.

    Again, what goes into your kit and where you put it and how you mark it, is up to you and what you think works for your bike and your comfort level. But PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE get some training.

    #20
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