Which first aid kit?

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Peanut_Buttery, Jan 27, 2020.

  1. Boondox

    Boondox Travels With Barley

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    You mentioned that you’ve had training. Great first step! Now make sure whatever supplies you carry are supplies you are familiar with. Dealing with trauma is not the time to read packaged instructions. As a former FMF Corpsman and Navy PA there are supplies (and procedures) I’m comfortable with that many would not be. I keep those supplies inside my pannier for use on others. General trauma supplies (my Oh Shit Kit) is in plain sight in case others need them for me
    #21
  2. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

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    FA-Kit-1.JPG

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    Pelican 1150 box, waterproof and crush proof and really not all that damn big. Lives on top of the load. Reflective red crosses all sides and grip tape on all edges, my hands might be wet or bloody (and I used it for sea kayaking). It may be raining when you have to deploy your kit, a little zipper thing with cute pouches for everything won't do. Just breaking the kit out can be reassuring to your patient, it looks substantial.

    Inside the box more wet sensitive stuff like gauze is in ziplocks (it's raining).

    In addition to meds mentioned I carry caffeine tabs. Keeps you going when you have to and is a laxative if needed. Also glucose tablets to treat the shakes following a big adrenaline hit. Used those on the guy that fell off the cliff.

    Don't carry a SAM Splint do carry an ensolite sleeping pad that can be cut into a splint and used with the big ace bandage. Same bandage is a compress, sling, etc. The ensolite pad will also keep the victim off the ground and warm. Past that I just put my clothes on them.

    Stuff like skin staples and vet bond can be gotten OTC on amazon for back country travel. Butterflies will get you to a clinic for sutures otherwise. I stopped shaving so I will add a disposable razor. Tape and butterflies stick better if you shave the skin first. I always make sure I have some water for cleaning wounds.

    Little commercial kits are good for packets of anti-biotic ointment and the like. This stuff can also be gotten on Amazon but sometimes you have to buy a box.

    Band Aids matter. I only carry the best flex fabric. Amazon again. The silly things can keep you going when you would otherwise have to turn around. Also larger gel bandages for rash (keeps the wound moist for later cleaning), big self stick Telfa pads, etc.

    I carry moleskin and a scalpel blade (#11). If you have to hoof it and all you have for walking is your boots the sucrets tin with the moleskin should be in your pocket.

    I had a vagina for 8 weeks once and learned all about Lite Days pads. Clean, absorbent and good for dressing a draining wound that is otherwise difficult to dress.

    Worth keeping in mind (when training) every day emergencies that have nothing to do with the sport. Like an abscess or appendicitis. Having strong antibiotics can save your life provided you still get to a hospital in time.
    #22
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  3. AZ Pete

    AZ Pete Been here awhile

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    I would add one or two large "multi trauma" pads as well. Or maybe his feminine hygiene products fill that role.
    #23
  4. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

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    not really that large but the "lite" ones aren't overly shaped and they all have sticky strips on one side. The last time I needed a compress on a seriously bleeding wound, in the back country, I grabbed the big ace bandage, it was on top. Cost me an ace bandage and it would have been nice to have a cheaper absorbent pad. I sat with the thing clamped to my head until the bleeding mostly stopped then pulled my hat down hard over it to hold it in place (stood up in a cave in the wrong place). While I was sitting there chilling and waiting for it to really clot up well I saw everyone running so I slammed the kit closed and followed to find the guy that fell off the cliff. When I got to that scene it was bleeding again so I looked a little rough but there were things to tend to. Fortunately a cute girl was handy to clean us both up. Treating for shock don'tcha know:D
    #24
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  5. Exurban

    Exurban Been here awhile

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    Sanitary napkins? What’s wrong with a real first aid item designed for that purpose? You know, those sterile gauze pad things in the first aid kit. If someone is trying to help me with a staple gun and sanitary napkin, I’ll pass.

    The OP is a road rider in the U.K. where, as in the much of the U.S. most response times are measured in minutes and rarely hours and days. That’s a lot different scenario than remote back country where first aid might rarely turn into medical treatment or self-evacuation. As someone else pointed out, needs will vary with the circumstances and in most situations one will render limited aid for a limited time until professionals arrive, ostensibly without sanitary napkins.
    #25
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  6. AZ Pete

    AZ Pete Been here awhile

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    funny....when I rode an ambulance sanitary napkins were considered great stuff for severe bleeding. We had trauma pads, but a fresh kotex is a good cheap substitute....really they are much better than someones t- shirt or bandana.
    #26
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  7. panfam007

    panfam007 Been here awhile

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    As a professional I will recommend the following:

    A basic first aid kit is what everyone has, or should have at home... bandages, Band-Aids, Motrin, Benadryl....etc.

    These are great, but not what's needed in a true vehicle emergency.
    Chances are if all you need is a bandage or sanitary pad... You will easily survive until help arrives.

    Now, most lethal trauma is not head injury in motorcyclists, but chest injury... Sanitary pad won't help if chest is punctured with pneumo/hemothorax.

    If you sever yourself bad and in risk of bleeding out, a sanitary pad won't help you there either. You need a good tourniquet and a good clotting bandage/agent.

    If one can't breathe, an airway is a must, and minutes matter.

    Hope everyone stays safe... But know what you're carrying and what for.
    #27
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  8. Cam

    Cam Been here awhile

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    Generally speaking the only required items are used to treat a person not breathing or bleeding significantly. Pretty much everything outside of that is "nice-to-have". Essentially you want a way to contact emergency services quickly either via cell or satellite, know CPR, know how to check vitals and have basic equipment to manage a serious bleed. In virtually every other serious circumstance, a typical rider should contact professionals and move the injured as little as necessary.

    The secondary item I suggest carrying is Dakin's Solution or Iodine because infections are a very real issue even with minor scrapes and abrasions. Antibiotic topicals are effectively worthless, peroxide is mostly pointless and alcohol doesn't work on everything... alcohol seems to just piss off the really nasty stuff like vibrio. Iodine is great but messy. Dakins isn't as gentle as Iodine and cannot be exposed to light for long periods of time (hence the brown bottle) or it destabilizes but it is effective and far more gentle than alcohol.

    Pretty much everything else rotates around dulling pain, managing stomach issues and stabilizing minor injuries such as minor cuts, sprains, splinters/stings, eye flushes, etc. No need to overthink it.
    #28
  9. Grreatdog

    Grreatdog Long timer Supporter

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    Same here. When I went to a rural VFD that wasn't county supported and bought their own stuff, we stocked our trauma boxes out of whatever worked and whatever we could buy for cheap locally. That was a staple.

    Once the county took us over, we got all the real stuff we wanted. We also got an EMS unit stationed with us. Which was nice. But before that, we did some shopping in the feminine hygiene aisle.
    #29
  10. dirtmarine

    dirtmarine Been here awhile

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    As a paramedic in a mountain community for many years I would add to panfam007 and say that first establish your goals for the kit based somewhat on your training but knowing there may be more qualified persons available. Do you want a kit for day rides to render aid to another accident victim pending EMS arrival and/or an overnight camping kit? The more you add the more space you need. A lot of kits are laden with a lot of "stuff" some of which is good for scrapes, abrasions and lacerations but not so good for arterial bleeding requiring CAT tourniquets, Quick Clot, battle dressings, chest seals for open chest wounds, nasal tube for unconscious but breathing patient, etc. EMS response is pretty rapid and widespread in most of the U.S. with exceptions in back country or isolated areas with volunteers who respond from home or work. If you are in areas without phone service consider a GPS locator. In the meantime primary concerns with be the ABCs. I have "go bag" at home with these supplies but now putting together a kit for my motorcycle for day trips and mainly for injuries that need immediate attention prior to EMS arrival or items to get me home in comfort from scrapes and bruises, back pain, bug bites, etc.

    I'm looking at one of the smaller Vanquest.com kits (recently discovered them) and individually choose my items beginning with treatment for things that can kill someone in the next 5 minutes and then add the things such as bandaids, sterile wipes, Benadryl anti-itch, anti bacterial cream, dressing for non-arterial bleeds, Tylenol, Advil, personal meds, etc. Consider a first aid course by someone who frequents the outdoors or consider a class by an experienced medic who rides motorcycles to explain their take on essentials for riders.

    While I am generally opposed to buying "kits" here is one I'm considering ordering and then putting into my own bag such as the Vanquest. You really can't buy these items for much less individually and it steers you in right direction for the more advanced essentials. It contains quality items IMO and you can mix and match according to your needs and goals.
    https://www.amazon.com/MediTac-Prem...uPWNsaWNrUmVkaXJlY3QmZG9Ob3RMb2dDbGljaz10cnVl
    #30
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  11. MoikonaBoik

    MoikonaBoik Imagining whirled peas

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    +1 for "get training"
    After taking remote area first aid training I added three things to my basic kit:
    1. SAM splint. Yes you can fashion a splint out of twigs and your girlfriend's hair but, having experienced broken bones in the wilderness twice in my life, the SAM splint looks awfully attractive to me particularly if I have to apply it to myself. Broken bones are a very real risk for dual sporting so this one is worth the extra space.
    2. Medical grade honey, comes in small packets. Replaces iodine and the other stuff that stains your undergarments a nasty shade of brown. Better, get your riding buddy to carry some and then you can snack on it while he/she is asleep.
    3. Benadryl. Again, based on personal experience with an allergic reaction that was easily solved with Benadryl... but not before I ran up a $1200 tab at the local ER.
    One last thing - if you have an inReach or Spot, buy a GEOS search and rescue subscription. Trivial cost, would really dull the pain of a $50,000 helicopter ride.
    #31
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  12. dirtmarine

    dirtmarine Been here awhile

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    Thanks for reminding me MoikonaBoik but I misstated in my post about Benadryl anti- itch cream. What I meant was hydrocortisone cream for itching. As stated oral Benadryl 25-50 mg is useful for some allergic reactions and in cases of severe reactions (anaphylaxis) then an epi-pen should be available for those with a history. Consult your Dr. for various meds if your trip is extended or backcountry. For more severe pain where a prescription pain med is not available there is some belief that an aspirin with tylenol is more effective than either alone. http://www.safemedication.com/safemed/PharmacistsJournal/CanYouDoubleUponPainKillers
    #32