Which paint to block old odor from wall?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Alexander B, Sep 8, 2019.

  1. Alexander B

    Alexander B Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,129
    Location:
    Sweden
    Garage was earlier used as home for one or more large dogs, and there was lots of grime and greasy dirt on the walls and the floor. The epoxy covered floor cleaned up ok after lots of hot water, strong detergent and elbow grease. Still seems ok after a few weeks.
    The walls, not so much. Drywall (gypsum), and they were painted prior to the dogs moving in. I have scrubbed and cleaned every square inch of the walls and ceiling, as above using hot water, strong detergent and lots of effort.
    Came out well, and remained "odorless" for many days, after which I then painted all walls and ceiling with a "masonry coating" paint. It is for basements, outhouses etc, and will allow "humidity" to transfer from inside the wall, to the room, where it can evaporate. Standard paint and method for Sweden, and normally totally fine.

    However, after some weeks, the smell of dog fur has now permeated the fresh paint (2 layers), and the garage smells like a badly kept kennel again. I can smell the odor coming from within the walls themselves.

    Any recommendations on how to proceed? My only hope is to find an "airtight" paint to keep the odor locked in the drywall.
    Please note that I am in Sweden, so specific brands and labels may not be available to me. However, indications on "acrylic is better than oil based" etc are very welcome. Many thanks in advance!
    #1
  2. branchkin

    branchkin Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2015
    Oddometer:
    153
    Location:
    hills of north Ga.
    Oil based does the best job of sealing an item, but it sounds like it's already got at least one layer of water based paint. If there is much moisture coming through the drywall and the paint, oil based will eventually turn loose.
    #2
    Alexander B likes this.
  3. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2011
    Oddometer:
    3,699
    Replace the drywall.
    #3
  4. mglsite

    mglsite Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2008
    Oddometer:
    787
    Location:
    Covington, La.
  5. Beezer

    Beezer Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2004
    Oddometer:
    9,132
    Location:
    Anchorage, formerly Spenard (hub of the universe)
    kilz is a joke
    #5
    Alexander B likes this.
  6. wheelspin63

    wheelspin63 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2008
    Oddometer:
    125
    Location:
    Newnan, Georgia
    "Flood" the garage with ozone, then use quality oil based primer. Topcoat with oil or latex.
    #6
    Tmaximusv and Alexander B like this.
  7. Alexander B

    Alexander B Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,129
    Location:
    Sweden
    Not an option right now.
    #7
  8. Alexander B

    Alexander B Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,129
    Location:
    Sweden
    Thanks, all!
    #8
  9. Motopsychoman

    Motopsychoman Not a total poseur Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2013
    Oddometer:
    4,049
    Location:
    Oaklandish
    One last suggestion: BIN primer. It's shellac. It sticks to anything dry and seals everything I've ever run across.
    #9
  10. TeneRay

    TeneRay Bitch, I'm fabulous

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,950
    Location:
    MO
    Kilz has its limitations. I renovated a home that had a smoker and cats. Three layers on everything took care of the bulk but on hot, humid days the odor will creep back. It's not intolerable but noticeable in one part of the house.
    #10
  11. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2011
    Oddometer:
    3,699
    Surface sealers, even if 100% effective, don’t seal outlet openings, floor joints, etc. So the odor will be reduced, but it won’t be defeated. Just as you’ve already experienced.

    It’s a garage, the drywall work doesn’t have to be done to the quality level a house wall does. If the drywall was laid horizontally, you likely only need to replace the lowest level.
    #11
    spokester and phreakingeek like this.
  12. Amphib

    Amphib A mind is like a parachute....

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2018
    Oddometer:
    1,938
    Location:
    Wnc
    I have a lot of experience with this. I would use zinsser cover stain. It dries quickly. Use plenty of ventilation! And a respirator.... Not a dust mask.

    Kilz, shellac bin, also work. The paint stores will also have their specific lines that will handle this.
    #12
    ozmoses likes this.
  13. ozmoses

    ozmoses . Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2009
    Oddometer:
    34,231
    Location:
    USA??
    Coverstain- one of the best,multi-purpose, primers I've used in 30+ years of using primers.
    #13
    Amphib likes this.
  14. Amphib

    Amphib A mind is like a parachute....

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2018
    Oddometer:
    1,938
    Location:
    Wnc
    Its my go to. I always have it stocked in the van. It works well for everything. Too many others you'll need to reprime with something else.....whether it's tanin bleed, poor adhesion....plus it sands extremely smooth, sticks to anything, dries extremely fast, and is found in many places.
    #14
  15. Alexander B

    Alexander B Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,129
    Location:
    Sweden
    Thank you for all the help!
    Unfortunately, those branded products are not available here. (Paint and many construction products are almost under oligopoly in Sweden. A handful of manufacturers split the market between themselves.)
    There is one product specifically targeting my problems, but it is approx. $200/gallon, incl vat. I will try some oil based paint first.
    #15
  16. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    6,967
    Location:
    below the sea
    Here in UK I would use a cheap oil based primer or undercoat. Does not need to be an expensive one.
    MY SiL is a pro decorator and advises this for rooms that have had habitual smokers in, or lots of dogs/animals. Same for water leak stains.
    Water soluble stains will be released by water based paints, so they just reappear again and again, undercoat seems to discolour pretty quickly, but it usually has greater obliteration power.
    One of the waterbased acrylic based paints over the top should hold its colour longer because it is the oil binders in oil based paints that cause discolouration over time.
    I would spend some time carefully sealing each and every joint with decorators caulk. Walls, floors and ceiling window and door frames, everywhere. The smelly solids may have got forced into any crack or crevice or seam.
    #16
  17. ydarg

    ydarg Miscreant

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2015
    Oddometer:
    1,810
    Location:
    Above the Equator
    This. I've bought and sold three smoker's houses now, the only way to permanently get the smell out is to gut the drywall (and ductwork but that's a different discussion) and redo all the trim.
    #17
  18. Beezer

    Beezer Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2004
    Oddometer:
    9,132
    Location:
    Anchorage, formerly Spenard (hub of the universe)
    as mentioned, shellac is a good sealer & pretty cheap too. it goes over anything and everything sticks to it on top.
    #18
  19. AviatorTroy

    AviatorTroy Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,282
    Location:
    Castle Rock, CO
    Take it from someone with a lifetime of experience with rental properties... Cat piss, smokers, greasy kitchens, engine blocks left in the basement you name it I’ve seen it. Oil based Kilz is what you want. If odors are still present they are coming from surfaces you can’t paint as mentioned previously.
    #19
    Tmaximusv likes this.
  20. Gruesome

    Gruesome Alter Heizer

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,483
    Location:
    Chicago
    Running an ozone generator for a few days sounds like a good idea. I'm not sure what it will do to wire insulation though, and other plastic parts you can't remove.
    #20