Which tools to get to change a flat?

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by markomarkovich, Feb 13, 2018.

  1. XRman

    XRman Long timer

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    I second the suggestion to practise at home with removing wheels and repairing punctures/ replacing tubes using only the tools you carry.

    My contribution is to suggest that you carry a small bottle of dish washing liquid for lube or a ziplock bag of Lux flakes. Add water and make a paste.

    Some riders report that the Best Rest bead breaker can struggle with E09 Mitas and Motoz Adventure tyres. Tyreplier make a G clamp device that seems to work better.

    One thing that really annoys me is pinching a repaired tube during the final stage of reinstallion. I carry a bajanopinch tool to make this simpler.
    #21
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  2. davidpetersen

    davidpetersen BestRest Adventurer

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    I don't struggle breaking a Moto-Z or Mita, using the BestRest BeadBrakR.

    I wonder where that concept came from. Ain't so.

    Breaking the bead is pretty easy... it's the spooning of those stiff tires oon or off thats sometimes difficult. Lots of lube, proper technique, and keeping the near side of the bead in the drop center is the trick. Moto-Zipp ties will help a lot.
    #22
  3. XRman

    XRman Long timer

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    Great. Perhaps you can You Tube your method David.

    I think it could be certain rim/tyre combinations are harder than others.

    I read it in an instructional article in ADV rider magazine from Oz that they struggled using the Best Rest product. I don't have the article in front of me as I am interstate. Like most tools repetition is the key to success.
    #23
  4. davidpetersen

    davidpetersen BestRest Adventurer

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    Go to YouTube and put BestRest Products in the search bar. Then go to the main video page. We have lots of free videos showing tire changing, including the Moto-Z. There's also a video of a gal showing how to do it.
    #24
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  5. XRman

    XRman Long timer

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    David I owe you an apology
    I found the magazine article and it was the motion pro bead breaker they struggled to remove a Mitas E09 rear 17 inch tyre, not yours. In fact they said your product worked well with good instructions.

    Unfortunately your product costs 4 times the cost of the Tyreplier product in our local market.
    #25
  6. davidpetersen

    davidpetersen BestRest Adventurer

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    No worries. Thanks for the clarification.

    Sorry about the price difference. Can't make ours cheaper because we manufacture them with an exotic metal called "BestRestium"
    #26
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  7. markomarkovich

    markomarkovich Been here awhile

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    Hey guys i have an update.

    I went out and got the BestRest Bead Breaker. I have never owned a bike with spoked rims before nor have i ever changed a flat or a tire on a tubed rim. I pretty much started from scratch and watching youtube videos and getting help from david i believe at Best Rest. David it was I who called you this afternoon, thank you very much for the help and taking time out of your day to talk to me on the phone.

    I ended up taking off a new set of Michelin Anakee 3's to replace them with K60 Scouts. Im taking a 6 plus month trip around europe beginning in july and i wanted K60's as i did 14000 miles in NYC and the new york area without getting one single flat, meanwhile my michelin street tires had about 8 plugs within 3000 miles.

    A few guys on the forum actually got me worried that i won't be able to get the K60's on the rim especially for my first time even at home. I am very happy to say they didn't turn me down and i went for it anyway. It took me about 4 hours total maybe to do both rims, the rear was harder then the front but not nearly impossible at all. I would have no problem doing this on the side of the road in the swiss alps this summer alone. After doing it the first time I'm sure it will be easier the second time. I used a lot of dishwashing soap, well actually not that much. I saved the beadgoop for when I'm actually going to do this in the trails or on the side of the road.

    I order a little blue plastic piece that will save my rim from getting destroyed by the tire irons which will hopefully come in handy and actually protect my rim, i kind of beat it up pretty badly today for my first time. I recommend getting it before you try your first time. Added a link below but i have no idea how to make it a clicky.


    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00CU8ZN34/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    I will be going to the shop tomorrow to get the rims balanced with the new tires on it. Hopefully it will be cheap after i worked all day long to get the tires mounted.



    Attached Files:

    #27
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  8. Rider 101

    Rider 101 Time poor

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    Travel with a mate? Use his bike and side stand to break the bead. At worst use your boot to break the bead. I can do an 18" in about 20 minutes ( a bit slow ) Watched a mate change his rear TYRE on 1200GS in 15 minutes. Do the tyre when it has been ridden flat for a few Ks ( miles ). It warms the carcass and makes it easier. All about practise ( note the spelling :D ). Because I am a lazy shit I let the bike shop do the rear but a 21" is a doddle.
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  9. davidpetersen

    davidpetersen BestRest Adventurer

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    Glad I was helpful in your efforts. Changing your first tire is like learning how to ride: throttle, clutch, shifter, brakes. At first it seems overwhelming. Get one item in front of the other and you fail. But if you're persistent those skills develop and soon you're a pro.
    #29
  10. XRman

    XRman Long timer

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    Spelling? Practice as a noun has a C, as a verb it has a S. In English that is, not American English
    #30
  11. Rider 101

    Rider 101 Time poor

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    Oooo I din't proof read before posting. Should have had that 2nd JD :drink Corrected now. Thanks XRman

    Back to tyre changing, I use a couple of Metzeler tyre levers and a Michelin patten tyre lever. I like to use plenty of baby powder in the carcase as opposed to liquid lube.
    #31
  12. vesteroid

    vesteroid Adventurer

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    I just spent a totally stupid amount of time changing my 800gsa rear with the best rest set up. I very nearly gave up. I have several bloody knuckles and I am sure I will be sore in the am. I completely forgot the lube until I had the tire off.....I hd the fight of my life getting the stock tires off. Stupid, I know. I just spaced it. So I go to put the tire back on and realize all the videos are tubeless so I had to wing it on how to,get the tube in And use the valve stem tool. That went ok, got the first side on then came hell. I have a tracrtionator adventure rear and it has lugs that come up about 30 degrees on the side so that when you put your knees on the tire, it’s right on an edge and it’s pretty darn painful. I let the pain talk me out of using my knees to hold the tire down as I was in determined mode by that point. I got all the way around to about 8 inches left and could not get it over the rim, no matter what. I actually bent the tire irons and put some pretty good scrapes in my rim. Then I watched a few more videos and realized my error of not getting the other side of the tire down in the rim. I found a towel and made it more comfortable and it went right on.

    So bloody knuckles, lots of swearing, and 3 hours later the tire is on and pumped up. Going to check it in the am to see if I pinched the tube. I feel stupid, yet accomplished lol. Live and learn.

    Btw where do you all get tubes for the rear at 150/70-17. I only find street tubes when I search...is there another size off road or dual sport that works?
    #32
  13. XRman

    XRman Long timer

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    You need a bajanopinch tool. Magic for putting the tyre back on the rim.

    Wearing MX knee guards helps or gardening knee pads. Heating the tyre on your car's hood/bonnet to soften the tyre is another good trick.
    #33
  14. davidpetersen

    davidpetersen BestRest Adventurer

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    First-time tire change is always a challenge. Sorta like first-time clutching. You stall a lot, you probably fall down a lot, but eventually you learn the skill and after that it's easy.

    Here's some pointers to make the job easier:

    1. Lube? Make sure the beads are lubed. Most folks think they've done a good job putting on lube, but they really haven't. Put on your thinking cap and visualize the friction point between rubber and rim for EVERY step in the process. Tire coming off the rim, the bead needs to be lubed on the outside of the first bead, the inside of the second bead. Tire going on the rim, the first bead needs to be lubed on the inside, the second bead lubed on the inside. And finally the outside of both beads need to be lubed so they slip into place on the rim when you inflate the tire.

    2. Well? Get the bead into the "well" of the rim (some call it the drop-center). Most folks think they're compressing the bead, making room to work on the opposite side of the tire, but in most cases they're not actually getting the bead down far enough. The bead ends up sitting up on the shoulder, which means you won't have working room on the opposite side of the tire. That makes your job difficult, if not impossible.

    3. MotoZipps? Having problems squishing those beads together so they go into the well? Use MotoZipps or straps to cinch the beads together. On a tubeless tire you can do it before you begin mounting, but that's not my way. I get one side of the tire on the rim, then slip the MotoZipps between tire and rim, then cinch them up tight (you need about a 12" arc cinched together). When they finally touch, you're good. So when you're spooning on the opposite side of the tire you'll have plenty of room between rubber and rim, and that makes things go on pretty easy.

    4. Tubes? Mounting a tubed tire is pretty much the same as a tubeless, but you need to take into account that extra bulk inside the tire. My way is to get the first side mounted, then fit the tube into the tire. At 3:00 I fit the valve stem into the rim. Then I push the tube all the way into the tire, all the way around. Then I MotoZipp the tire at 6:00. And I do my spooning at 12:00. Others may do things differently, like putting the stem at 12:00. Diff'rent strokes.

    5. Pinches? Tube pinches happen because the tire iron was rotated too far, which brings the tip around in an arc, trapping the tube and cutting it with the end of the tire iron against the rim. You can minimize this by adding a few PSI of air to the tube, which causes it to straighten out and slip past the tire iron, but the BEST RULE is to never rotate the tire iron more than about 15 degrees past vertical (based on an imaginary line running vertically, perpendicular from the edge of the rim). Once you reach that point of rotation, use another tire iron a few inches away and pick up your next bit of tire bead, and spoon the tire a bit more. Small bites. Big smiles.

    6A. Irons? You don't need humongous tire irons. If you work in a tire shop you might want to use something big because that makes your work easier and faster, but large irons are no substitute for proper technique. A 9" iron is plenty long enough. If you're bending short irons you're doing something wrong. Stand back, evaluate, then you'll see that you probably need more lube or you need to get the bead into the well. I like working with 3 irons, but some get by with 2. If you've got a BestRest TireIron BeadBrakR you'll get 3 in the kit.

    6B. When you've almost got the 2nd bead spooned on the rim, you'll notice that it's difficult to get a tire iron between the rubber and trim to get that last 6" of bead over the edge. BEFORE you get to that spot, put the straight end of one spoon in the center of that section. Then when you've got all the rest of the bead over the rim, that iron is staged and ready to rotate. Remember, no more than 15 degrees past vertical.

    7. Baja Tool? Finally, while I appreciate the concept behind the Baja No Pinch tool, it's not something most riders are willing to carry on the bike (all the time). And if you don't carry it all the time, that means it's sitting in your garage. That's fine if you always change tires in the garage, but if you're on top of a mountain you're screwed. And tubed tire repair is basically the same thing as a full tire change, minus the last step of pulling the tire entirely off the rim. The Baja is a single-purpose tool designed to overcome poor spooning and tire mounting technique. The tool has so much leverage that you can pretty much ignore getting the beads down into the well, but that comes at the cost of stretching or damaging the tire bead. Seen it happen. The user thought he was saving effort by not getting the bead in the well, instead he destroyed his tire.
    #34
  15. XRman

    XRman Long timer

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    Great tips Dave, but I have to disagree with point 7. I carry the relevant bits of the BNP tool in a sock to suit my Tiger inside my pannier bag. It doesn't weigh much. It also make dealing with Motoz Adventure tyres and Mitas E09 a lot easier. I carry a bottle of dish washing liquid soap as lube and so far never have destroyed a tyre using the BNP tool. One needs to know when to stop using brute strength. If it won't go on it pays to back track and lube so more.
    #35
  16. davidpetersen

    davidpetersen BestRest Adventurer

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    We all make decisions about what gear is important to carry, based on size, weight, and whether it will be needed on the trail.

    For you the BNP is something you're willing to carry, and that's cool. For me, it's not. A single-purpose tool that performs a task I can easily do with the tire irons I already carry isn't my cup of tea, but for others it's a must-have item.

    Sometimes our decisions aren't good ones. I carried a can of green beans in my saddlebags for about 10,000 miles. "Emergency Rations" or so I thought, something to keep me alive until S&R found me huddled under a pine bough shelter. (The beans were probably something The Wife liked and insisted I carry on one of our trips.) Then one day I realized I didn't like canned green beans. So I replaced that can o'beans with something more important - a plastic bottle of blended whiskey. Now I don't worry about S&R finding me.

    PS. Kudos for carrying the BNP in a sock. I assume you also carry the 2nd sock somewhere on the bike, that way you'll always have a fresh pair. :rofl
    #36
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  17. XRman

    XRman Long timer

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    Whisky can also act as a disinfectant after you skin your knuckles. I like your thinking.

    What are green beans?

    The problem as I look at it is that most of us don't change tyres trail side all that often. I ride solo a lot of the time and when you have a new 17 inch rear stiff sidewall tyre fitted, any tool that can avoid pinching the tube ( meaning I have to redo the procedure) is worth carrying. I don't bother when on my DRZ as I can manage those tryes with my irons no problem. I run them flat a little to heat them up ( rims lock fitted) and the 18 inch tyres are a bit more flexible.
    #37
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  18. davidpetersen

    davidpetersen BestRest Adventurer

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    Yer right. Most of us don't change tires by the trail side... but... but... a tubed tire repair by the trail side is basically the same thing as a "tire change", with the exception of not having to remove the entire tire from the rim. Ya gotta break those beads, spoon off the first side of the tire, pull out the tube (fully if you're replacing it, or partially if you're just patching one spot), then spoon the tire back onto the rim. Where the BNP comes in handy is that last little part of the process - spooning that last 12" of bead which is the hardest part of the equation.

    Kudos to the BNP (wish I'd invented it but I was busy perfecting a time travel device which should hit the market in the fall). Yahoo if the BNP is something you've decided to carry. But pinched tubes are the result of one thing and one thing only: over-rotating the tire iron. Limit tire iron rotation to no more than 15 degrees past vertical and you've eliminated the problem. Just sayin' :-)
    #38
  19. Redback-gj

    Redback-gj Been here awhile

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    Don't you mean last fall?
    #39
  20. davidpetersen

    davidpetersen BestRest Adventurer

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    I wrote that message 2 years ago. It just showed up today. All systems seem to be working.
    #40