Why do I keep dropping my bike?

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by Aussie Stephen $$, Oct 23, 2020.

  1. Aussie Stephen $$

    Aussie Stephen $$ Adventurer

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    I know I’m getting older, as I just turned 50 , but I had my Harley Fat Boy for 16 years and dropped it once in the driveway when I thought the stand was down. I’ve had my F850GSA for 3 weeks and dropped it 4 times now. Luckily just around the home, moving when cleaning ect. Bloody hell im getting pissed off with doing it though.
    #1
  2. Kwafo

    Kwafo Two wheeler

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    Time for a sub 160 kg bike ;-) or a lower bike.

    All road bikes are high and their point of gravity is also relatively high. So that might be the cause.
    #2
  3. BygDaddee

    BygDaddee Long timer

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    Only you can answer that mate.
    But GSA’s arent light bikes, and top heavy

    you have to get ready when you push it around, and you have to think everytime you do a tight turn, or pull up on uneven or slippery ground. Its the main reason I moved my 1200 on, I’ll most likely have another one later but you have to be ready for them

    Not sure how tall you are, but dont wear road boots with thin soles, where adventure boots, even if they arent solid adv boots at least have thick soles, every centre metre helps
    #3
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  4. Aussie Stephen $$

    Aussie Stephen $$ Adventurer

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    Yeah just need to get used to pushing it around. I had no shoes on today and even though I’m 6’2” with the bar risers it’s very high even for me, just pushing it around.
    Only had it a few weeks, so I just need to hpget used to the night center of gravity.
    Love the bike though.
    #4
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  5. motolover

    motolover rookie

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    Just train walking around bike while in upright position, pushing it from the left and from the right side and such exercises. Let somebody help you with it, to be on a safe side. Get a spotter, like doing bench press :)
    #5
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  6. SnoDrtRider

    SnoDrtRider I've been lost here before...

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    When I move our bikes (and most bikes) it's one hand on the bars (left grip) and the other on the rear rack grab bar. This keeps you on the side of the bike rather than reaching over it to get both hands on the grips. This way you can use your body to counterbalance the weight of the bike.
    #6
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  7. sieg

    sieg Wearing out tires......2 at a time, day after day. Supporter

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    Hmmm I'm 65 and can't remember the last time I dropped a bike moving it around. You're definitely doing something wrong. Keep it centered and balanced. I friend that owns a motorcycle dealership told me to move them from the right side with the kick stand down. Like that you can either catch the weight or the kick stand will.
    #7
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  8. NxtGoRnd

    NxtGoRnd This Time Around, Wearing Out Tires Supporter

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    I too went years without dropping any of my Harleys and back in the day I did not always use best judgement some would say I still don't. I had a drop when I pulled up home and did not deploy the kick stand but had been drinking....I know bad right!

    Harleys tend to be low bikes with low center of gravity and I never gave much thought to pushing them around, heavy but easier to balance than others for me.

    I am 67 and have a R1200GS for almost a year and a R11050GS before that. I am constantly afraid of dropping it when moving it around. I did drop the 1150 at the garage door but picked it up with a boom pole on my farm tractor LOL:lol3

    I had a DR250 pretty tall bike but not overly heavy never worried about dropping it either.

    I think age plays a part but in my 50s it was not much of an issue. When you go to tall bikes with ground clearance then supersize them so they are very heavy with high center of gravity it can be harder to maintain that balance point. The longer the lever the more force it will apply a tall bike gets heavy fast when it starts leaning.

    I stand on left side with my body snug against the bike leaning slightly into me because that I can support but away from me will be no hope of holding it when it starts to go.

    Moving them with stand down from right side has not worked well for me although it may for you. Being right handed I like being on the left with strong hand and arm extended.

    But Balance is the big factor.
    #8
  9. Arbolmano

    Arbolmano Not so Studly

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    You’ll get there. I’m disabled and drop my poor F7 on regular basis. Fine when riding but too scrambled when stopped. My solution: full on crash bars. At least that way nothing gets scratched......and way easier to pick up.
    At least your not falling over at stop signs! Talk about embarrassing......
    #9
  10. shuswap1

    shuswap1 Long timer

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    I'm old and need to move bikes around a lot in the shop and on uneven ground outside. Stand on the right, sidestand down as back-up, right hand on right bar, left hand on rear rack and grit your teeth, no pussy footin' around when moving the beasts. In the event it gets away from me, it's nothing more than a tip onto the side stand. I just pretend that I planned to set it there.
    #10
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  11. dpike

    dpike BeeKeeper Supporter

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    if there's anything to take away from this thread it's getting old sucks.
    #11
  12. Reaver

    Reaver Why am I still here?

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    <---- Had her 10 years and now I'm 10 yrs older too. My avatar is the latest yet only my 4th drop. Premeditation is key.
    #12
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  13. ChopperCharles

    ChopperCharles Long timer

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    I'm constantly afraid of my SCR950 tipping over. The "point of no return" for the SCR is very, very close to completely upright. No other bike I've ever ridden has had such a narrow point of no return. It's a combination of top-heavy and overall weight. My 84 V65 Magna weighs a few pounds more, but that compact V4 and under-seat fuel tank keeps the weight down low. Even my full-dress GL500 Interstate has a far wider point of no return, even though it was panned in the past as being top heavy. I find it completely manageable in general, and hella-manageable compared to the SCR950.

    And I'll be honest, the reason I'm buying a CSC RX4 next year is because I found the height, weight, and top-heaviness of the big adventure bikes to be too much for me. I don't enjoy riding something that I always feel like I'm a hairsbreadth away from dropping. I like to feel confident in my ability to keep my bike upright, especially if I'm paddle-footing it through some gnarly rocks. But also even if I pull up to a stoplight and my jeans catch on the footpeg or there's oil in the road, I want to feel sure that there is no chance of me going down.

    Charles.
    #13
  14. FranknStein7

    FranknStein7 Been here awhile

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    The 850 GSA is a very heavy and fairly top heavy bike. Part of what got me interested in the 1250 GS is that Missenden Flyer said the 850 GSA was more difficult to maneuver around the garage than the 1250 GS/A. That's probably because the boxer engine on the 1250 lowers the center of gravity. It kind of amazes me that the 850 GSA and the 1250 GS (non-adventure) are about the same wet weight. Honestly I wish there was some standardized way for bike manufacturers to advertise how high the center of gravity is.

    When I test road the 1250 GS, I spent a lot of time just rolling the bike back and forth on the pavement like I was practicing getting it in and out of the garage. I'm sure the salesman was giving me a funny look. I ended up ordering a lowered 1250 GS because I found it increased my comfort level even more (plus I have a short inseam). I also park my bike in a cramped garage right next to an expensive kit car. So if I drop it I'm going to damage a lot more than just the bike.

    I would definitely advise having some sort of standardized exercise program to strengthen your core/chest/shoulders if you're going to be man handling a top heavy 550 lbs bike. Unfortunately most of us aren't in our 20s anymore or built like The Mountain.
    #14
  15. TommyTuenz

    TommyTuenz Adventurer

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    My first moto was a 2015 F700GS, and I had no prior experience with motorcycles so no benefit of understanding balance point or tipovers. One day I roll the bike into the center of the garage to see what standing on the pegs would feel like. After standing on the pegs for a bit, I dismount and put the stand up to roll the bike back to its park spot. Bike starts going over on the right side and at that point I learned several valuable lessons. Oh yeah, at the time I had a lovely, pristine 2010 Boxster...

    1) Don't screw around on your moto with other vehicles in the garage.
    2) Spend some time understanding the balance point of your bike(s).
    3) Move the bike from the right side with the sidestand down.
    4) Paintless dent repair is witchcraft worth every penny.
    #15
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  16. Tigershark48

    Tigershark48 My other BMW is a Roadster.

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    I'm 71 and it doesn't get any easier. Never dropped my F700, but it's up for sale. I'm driving my truck 2 1/2 hours away on Wednesday to pick up a used Suzuki DR650. The main reason is a 100 drop in weight. Did some test rides and it's so much easier to move around. Also as an enduro, it has a 21" front wheel and 10" suspension, so it provides an excellent ride. 360 lbs wet is a huge plus for me. Looking forward to the change.
    #16
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  17. BygDaddee

    BygDaddee Long timer

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    I'll bet your going to miss that 700, unless you spend a lot of money on the DR, even then there will be times youll miss it

    but if offroad and lighter is main objection, then I can understand.

    I've owned both

    #17
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  18. ubermick

    ubermick Long timer Supporter

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    Reeeeeeally??

    (Edit... never mind, saw where you were located and had a look on Craigslist, and see you want a local sale...)
    #18
  19. shuswap1

    shuswap1 Long timer

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    If you must change, the DR is a very good choice. Hard to find a bad bike design these days, so many decent mounts out there. That said, the DR/DRZ series stands out as user friendly in ways that matter.
    #19
  20. ChopperCharles

    ChopperCharles Long timer

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    I’ve always kinda had a soft spot for the drz SM. If I lived in the mountains or I trailered everywhere, I’d have one. That supermoto looks like an absolute blast.

    Charles.
    #20