Why do you still use a stand alone GPS?

Discussion in 'Mapping & Navigation' started by Kyle E, Mar 19, 2019.

  1. terryckdbf

    terryckdbf Bumbling BackRoad Riders™

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    Your comment had to do with the company failing to "bother to mention" the waypoint limits. I pointed out TomTom makes no reference to this either. Of course it has waypoint limits.

    The point being, rather than be constructive by simply asking the waypoint limit, you chose to bash a manufacturer. We all know Garmin is not perfect.

    This thread is "Why do you still use a stand alone GPS". Perhaps you should take your negativity over to the "Why I hate Garmin/TomTom and all stand alone gps units" thread.

    Terry
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  2. sierrastone

    sierrastone Adventurer

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    Concur. I use Rever on my iphone with downloaded maps and have a second "recycled" iphone 8 with using Gaia and maps downloaded with Google maps as a redundant backup. I've found Rever to be the best with planning and then following tracks.
  3. rexbro

    rexbro Been here awhile

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    I’m very comfortable with the Montana. It has a sturdy powered mount and has so far been unaffected by conditions I ride in. It has been reliable and earned my trust for traveling in areas I’m unfamiliar with. That being said I carry a backup unit on long trips in case something bad happens. :lol2 I also have a phone if it really gets grim. If all else fails I know how to read a genuine paper map too! I used to carry a compass in the old days and occasionally used it.

    My first gps was a Garmin GPS 3+. I mounted it on my plated “99 XR400R. I got used to Mapsouce very early but there were many limitations to the gps in those days due to memory/storage sizes. There were no phone options then either.

    Cold weather sucks if you’re unprepared for it. I’m from NH originally and lived in western NY, near Chicago, Ontario, Canada, and now Southeast PA. Living in those areas you either adapt to the cold or watch a lot of TV.

    Skiing and winter mountain biking taught me how to dress for the cold. With the motorcycle I use heated grips, 3/4 bar muffs, heated insoles, and a heated vest if it’s staying below 35f during my rides.

    :ricky > TV :ilmostro Black ice = :muutt
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  4. Albie

    Albie Kool Aid poisoner

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    But I don't hate Tom Tom. I don't care anything about Tom Tom.
  5. MidlifePanic

    MidlifePanic Been here awhile

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    What basic apps do you use?
  6. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Smoove, Smoove like velvet.

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    There are tons of them

    Tom Tom's android app is popular
    Ride With GPS I have a couple of friends that like it (designed for bicycles)
    OsmAnd is decent, but I don't usually use it due to excessive battery consumption
    Kurviger is solid...and Kurviger curvey routing protocols are integrated with my favorite planning site (www.fukot.com)

    Google Maps/Ways are great for when you have service and are in "get me here now" mode.

    I use Locus Pro for everything else, its not designed with motorcycles in mind, but its a swiss army knife that gets me wherever I needed to go.


    My Gamin-phile friends don't even try to route around me any more, but the time they figure out the re-route I am off and down the road usually with them frantically trying to catch up.
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  7. MidlifePanic

    MidlifePanic Been here awhile

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    Any of those good for rural roads, 4x4 trails and national forest?
  8. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Smoove, Smoove like velvet.

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    Locus is good for anything, it'll do straight topo overlays.

    Kurviger is also pretty good at looking for off-highway type stuff......but its all in the planning, which is why I mentioned Furkot.
  9. petertakov

    petertakov Been here awhile

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    Mostly by how they ruined a perfectly fine app with the 2.x update ... and I say that as a TTGo subscriber :-(
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  10. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Smoove, Smoove like velvet.

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    Oof
  11. flamingm0e

    flamingm0e Long timer

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    Yes. 2.x “update” is an abomination
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  12. nestastubbs

    nestastubbs Green Mountain Toys Super Supporter

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    Got the Nav 6 on my 2019 RT for a few reasons.

    1. Works without cell service
    2. Stays on the bike
    3. Waterproof operation and power
    4. Bike was a present to self for crushing a career defining deadline so I wanted the shiny

    Other than 4, these are the common reasons people give for stand-alone GPS. I've had occasional issues with phone charging in rain, and if you are using it as nav, it usually needs to be charging.

    Unexpected benefits:

    1. The display, which has this partial 3D perspective has been great for discovering new routes thru areas I've been riding for years.
    2. Same display also shows relief well, which tells me alot about rural roads and views from them
    3. My phone stay in my jacket, or with screen off in mount, so way less distraction
    4. The find gas feature when it senses my reserve indicator is sweet
    5. Showing upcoming RD has helped me learn road names.

    I have really enjoyed the discovery of new routes! Mostly it's because I can intuit if the road continutes thru the valley, or if it dead ends,and I can also see it's relationships to the major roads around it. It's caused me to take this RT on smaller, usually dirt, roads and to slow down enjoy the scenery.

    Not having the phone always on for nav also means that I am not tempted to scroll thru podcasts or playlists while riding. I still can use the simple set of commands Siri enabled thru my headset. As a result, I actually listen to less audio while riding. When my selected podcast is over, I'll just ride without until the next stop. That said, on a longer tour this summer, I still had the phone open a a doppler radar display while crossing the midwest. I am not sure I will do that again tho, the temptation to fuck with the phone in radar mode is too much. I did also use the phone to show a turn list for my route, which was WAY less tempting to mess with.

    Disappointments:
    1. I find it doesn't work great with gloves, but better than phone. I seldom do more than click on the gas icon.
    2. Exploring larger areas and using it like a "map" sucks, I just get my phone out, and transfer location.
    3. Basecamp feels like a 2002 leftover, so I don't plan routes with it, but I do import all my tracks.

    The failure of it to be a "map" has led to a new approach to route planning. On a long tour this summer, I started planning the next day using Google Maps on my iPad. I would then compile a turn list and save it as a Note on my iPhone. I would then have that open on the phone while riding. Even tho GMaps does ok at route editing, I found that a turn list was more flexible and no need to use the route finding except when getting initial time frames for traversing a region.

    Makes me think I would love to have some means to convert a "turn list" into a GPX file for the nav. Any suggestions?
  13. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    cellular reception and gps reception are not the same things... ie toy can use the gps antenna in a phone/tablet without cellular service.

    you can create gpx files in the ipad and export them, but you'll have to figure out how to get them to the ancient, non bluetooth/wifi garmin
  14. petertakov

    petertakov Been here awhile

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    I admire your persistence, I really do, but sometimes all it takes is to imagine the person you might be responding to and ask yourself whether it is really worth it. Works for me .. not always but more and more :-))
  15. scootertrog

    scootertrog Jedi Fart Master

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    I guess there are some out there that still believe the world is flat and we never landed on the moon and they've got women completely figured out.
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  16. nestastubbs

    nestastubbs Green Mountain Toys Super Supporter

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    Yes, I understand the difference between GPS signal and cellular signal. The reason I called out cellular service is that route planning is done in the cloud in google and apple maps, and one never seems to have preloaded the right area, and thus need data to get the map tiles.

    I also understand what GPX files are, and how to get them to the garmin -- but was asking about a solution/software/process for turning a "turn list" into a GPX file, without me having to make way points for every turn and every other place that the route planner wants to take me off of the road I selected.

    Something ipad pencil aware, that would let me progressivly draw a route and then reduce it to needed waypoints? That would be kewl. That image overlay feature mentioned earlier in this thread, done on a screenshot maybe...
  17. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    1 you're far ahead of most people !
    2 I don't normally use Google for route plotting, just getting updated phone numbers and business hours... but it will route offline, I do that a lot when just going a to b... yes, just love every other GPS on the planet, you have to have the maps if the area you're plotting.

    normally I plot routes with locus, but there are offline route builders that have much easier learning curves

    3 you're going to laugh, but I bet it would be entertaining to ask siri or Google to create a route fro a list of turns... that would be hilarious, but a failure in pretty sure
    4 the route plotter will go where it had data points, you'll have to shape it
    5 not sure what that means, sorry
    6
  18. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    I don't check very often any more... the info is out there for anyone that uses the search function on adv... which has gotten a lot better in the last few years
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  19. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    I have proof that women can't be figured out, the other two not so much
  20. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Smoove, Smoove like velvet.

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    iStuff is your issue there, I have made 1200 mile tracks by literally pointing and clicking in Locus Pro *tap* this *tap* this road, *tap* this road, and so on. Which got me from Shell Wyoming to the Black Hills and then Denver over the course of two days.


    Scenic is the best iPhone app that I have seen, but I haven't done more than load a track for someone else to follow.
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