Why I am ditching my TENT when moto-camping

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by dredman, Nov 3, 2019.

  1. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator

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    This is my entire sleeping system packed.

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    Warbonnet Blackbird XL in the light green stuff sack (all hardware inside stuff sack)
    Cuben fiber tarp with doors and 6 MSR ground hogs in a cuben fiber stuff sack
    Exped inflatable pillow in red
    The 2 12L Osprey bags hold my Warbonnet 0-degree down quilt and top-quilt (one each).

    All my gear for primitive camping in the R40
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    The same gear in a GL Coyote
    [​IMG]

    https://advrider.com/f/threads/the-art-of-packing-light.1333417/page-5 post number 99 details what I take on most rides.

    Regarding cold spots in a hammock: Thermarest makes a Z-pad that is very light and small. One thing I use them for is to place under my left shoulder while in the hammock as that is the only place I experience a cold spot when using an underquilt.
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  2. jsb223

    jsb223 ADV Rookie

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  3. The Cone of Silence

    The Cone of Silence Been here awhile

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    I had a Hennessy Hammock but sold it because my sciatica would play up in the hammock and I'd miss out on a decent night's sleep. A shame, it was a well-thought out product which I liked a great deal. I'm happy taking my Big Agnes Copper Spur HP2 Bikeback as it packs down very small but if I want to go really ultralight like I did last weekend, I won't take a tent at all.

    In this situation I'll put a small CGear mat down on the ground then a sleeping mat (Exped 9) on that and sleeping bag atop. If the weather looks like it might be moist, I'll put up a very lightweight tarp in whatever configuration suits the area. I used to use a bivvy bag but found that condensation would form on the inside and that could ruin a down sleeping bag. I guess a breathable GoreTex bivvy bag would be the best solution but that wouldn't pack down any smaller than my tent.
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  4. dredman

    dredman Dirty Moto-Tourist

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    Hate to hear your Hammock was not a fit for you, I have heard similar a few times. I have played with a bivvy-type setup but was miserable. Trying to stay off the ground unless there are no other options, and even then it may be a tarp across the bike? Bugs come, and I tie up the netted-hammock underneath, on the ground.
  5. The Cone of Silence

    The Cone of Silence Been here awhile

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    I HATE this forum. I really do. Everytime I see an interesting thread it costs me money thanks to my pathetic lack of willpower. I spent all morning researching bivys on the basis that I'm annoyed at not being able to find a decent one for UL bike trips....so I just pulled the trigger on a new one as it packs down very small and has a clever design...and it's GoreTex.

    You guys are bastards for even making me think about it ;-)

    If I get it by this weekend I'll go and give it a run and will advise performance. Outdoor Research Alpine Bivy. Not sure how it handles bushfires but it certainly seems impressive in the rain. Being on the ground doesn't bother me at all.
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  6. Yinzer Moto

    Yinzer Moto Long timer Supporter

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    For comparison. Here is all of my gear packed for a 2 night camping trip but there is no reason it could not have been a 20 night trip. The gear selection was very similar to what I have packed on longer trips. I have been trying to reduce pack size and weight.

    D57B162A-C16E-41B8-9E15-D008366BF490.jpeg

    341949FA-3ECE-4E7D-A680-9715BB9DF4B4.jpeg

    12 pounds, including the AltRider holsters. This includes changes of clothing. 30 degree sleeping bag. Waterproof bivy. Inflatable Insulated sleeping pad. Inflatable pillow. Battery powered inflator. A tarp for shelter outside of and over the entrance of the bivy. Coffee supplies. Some emergency food.
    nzrian, levain, AZQKR and 2 others like this.
  7. dredman

    dredman Dirty Moto-Tourist

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    I am thinking about adding just a small sheet of Tyvek for ground pad when there are no trees.....anybody used that before?
  8. Amphib

    Amphib A mind is like a parachute....

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    Yes. Works great. Lately I've been using a cut open contractor garbage bag.

    So I've returned from my trip. Saw alot of nasty weather. I did not camp as much as I hoped. But I did see temps into the 20s. Shockingly, my kelty 0° sleeping bag kept me warm with no under quilt. Now that I know this, I'll just be using my eno hammock/fly and that bag in the winter. In the summer I have a lightweight down bag. I'm happy to not have to purchase anything else!
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  9. Yinzer Moto

    Yinzer Moto Long timer Supporter

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    It is loud and does not pack as well as a real ground cloth. It is also brightly colored. A traditional ground cloth is inexpensive and packs up smaller. I tried all the tricks with the Tyvek to quiet it down but it never completely broke in and I thought it might loose some waterproofing if I continued to try and soften it. If you lived nearby, I’d give you my sheet of Tyvek, including nice tie off points.
    Maggot12, Amphib and dredman like this.
  10. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    There are posts around here somewhere, where a bathtub type floor was used. I think the sides came up a couple inches. Different sizes can be bought.

    I've never used anything.

    Googling found this... FFS :fpalm

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  11. borderlinebob

    borderlinebob Been here awhile

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    I used a piece for awhile but found the texture of it ( like Frogg Togg rainwear ) really attracted and dirt/mud and it didn’t just flick off easily so to me not worth it.
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  12. david61

    david61 Queue, a word with 4 silent letters....

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    Soft Tyvek [ 1443r and it's quiet ] is the go, I have a piece about 8 x 4 foot, it goes under the tarp when I camping as a "floor", a place to do tyre changes on or bike fixes, quick bit of shade or rain shelter, lots of uses really. Just fold and roll it up, hangs off the drybag on my bike, weighs stuff all, lasts for ages, cheap....
    dredman likes this.
  13. dredman

    dredman Dirty Moto-Tourist

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    What I have read so far makes me wonder if this is tough enough for the bush? What are your thoughts?
  14. AZQKR

    AZQKR Long timer

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    Tyvek® is made of 100% high density polyethylene fibers randomly laid and compressed to form a remarkably tough printing substrate that is ideal for applications where durability & tear resistance is of prime importance. Tyvek® can resist repeated folding and flexing without tearing.
  15. Oilhed

    Oilhed MarkF Supporter

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    The blue (green) woven plastic tarps don’t unravel when cut with sharp scissors. I’ve custom cut them for all my tents.
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  16. dredman

    dredman Dirty Moto-Tourist

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    Yes.

    But @david61 recommended Tyvek Fabric 1443r - which looks like it is made for kites more than construction? I believe that may also be the fabric used in Frogg Toggs?
  17. AZQKR

    AZQKR Long timer

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    https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php/525-The-Definitive-Tyvek-Article-Part-1

    Tyvek Soft Structure Type 1443R
    1.25 oz/yd2 ( Kite Tyvek)
    Type 14 styles offer excellent wet and dry protection against particulate matter and provide an excellent barrier. Type 14 has high opacity and good surface stability.
    Key Features:
    • Incredibly strong graphics
    • Unique balance of strength and softness
    • Stitch ability
    • Light weight and durable
    ________________________________________________________

    https://www.froggtoggs.com/product-tech
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  18. dredman

    dredman Dirty Moto-Tourist

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    Still looks like I am gonna spend $30 on a small patch of it - seems a little steep for construction material?
    AZQKR likes this.
  19. david61

    david61 Queue, a word with 4 silent letters....

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    ^ Find a construction site, few beers for a few yards?
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  20. wetwider

    wetwider Adventurer

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    Yet another solution: I've used a high-zoot camping hammock you get into through a slit in the bottom that Velcros itself shut when your weight's in the head-end of the hammock. 'Found it a PIA and cold in the Sawtooths. 'Have tent-camped a bunch off the bike and still do, but the best night sleeping in the woods ever was before fancy tents, pads, fleece and the synthetics of today.

    It was a dark & stormy night south of Monterey, CA, pouring rain in late fall. I was hitch-hiking north on Hwy. 1 from a boat-delivery job, without camping gear. 'Got let out of a ride in the middle of nowhere around 10 p.m., walked into the woods, dug out of my seabag a wool sweater, pulled sweat pants on over my jeans, wool watch-cap on my head, put on my foul weather gear - top with hood up, and the bottoms - then sea-boots and insulated rubber gloves I kept for night-watches. I lay down on wet leaves and sprawled, dry all night, cold rain dripping on my foulies ~ but inside was warm, comfy. I was able to move freely any which way, and I slept like a baby.

    Modern materials, fleece, a decent rain suit and most riding boots these days work about as well, and all but the boots & some fleece pack down to the volume of a basketball, but you'll be wearing the boots and maybe the fleece on the bike. A waterproof cover on the bike to stash your lose stuff under and... . Maybe a camping pad for where there are no leaves, no moss or ferns.

    `Can work well stealth camping; sometimes not so great in crowded campgrounds where privacy's or peeing dogs factor, or for reading when it rains but whaddya want?
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