Why I am ditching my TENT when moto-camping

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by dredman, Nov 3, 2019.

  1. dredman

    dredman Dirty Moto-Tourist

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    I think I want to hear more stories? :lurk
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  2. dredman

    dredman Dirty Moto-Tourist

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    Been riding around, only found a commercial job so far - they don't wrap concrete :)
  3. marvology

    marvology Been here awhile

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    For people thinking about hammock camping, I'd try out sleeping in one first to see if it works for you. I'm a side sleeper and I could never get comfortable in mine and I spent a lot on my setup. But, if you do go that route it's great how compact you can get your complete setup. Lots of friendly people and great resources at hammockforums.net, basically the hammock camping version of this site.
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  4. dredman

    dredman Dirty Moto-Tourist

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    Hard to argue with that advice. It seems like side-sleepers like us are really the problem with hammocks, and that is certainly why I avoided them for years. My hatred for ground camping eventually overcame my fear and doubt, and I dropped the initial $300+ bucks to the begin The Trials - I feel like maybe I got lucky, or maybe my motivation the get off the ground was enough to overcome the obstacles? Out of curiosity, did you try an ASYM? How much time did you spend on configuration, trial and error? Did you consult anyone about your issues? I am always curious about the fails, and how far someone was willing to go to make their hammock "fit" - my guess is always that after 2-3 nights of shitty sleep (or no sleep) that many setups find their way into a bonfire of broken dreams?
  5. Amphib

    Amphib A mind is like a parachute....

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    I've purchased all of my hammock items à la carte, it was not an initial big investment to try out. Worst case scenario was I'd just use it for naps in the yard, or take it on day trips with the family. I can manage some side sleeping in my set up, tho since I'm so much more comfortable, I usually just stay on my back.


    This just came through my feed and I may pull the trigger on it.

    https://newatlas.com/outdoors/aerial-hammock-tent-slackline/


    download.jpeg
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  6. Mumbles24

    Mumbles24 Been here awhile Supporter

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    My Warbonnet Ridgerunner is a bridge hammock. It allows back and side sleeping. I have between 500 and 600 nights in it and rarely a bad nights sleep. I have backpacked all seasons, all conditions and all types of terrain that has trees. Treeless situations may force me to bring my Tensa stand at 10#. That weight penalty for a great night sleeping aloft vs on the ground is the decision to make.

    My hammock, top quilt bottom quilt and small pillow all fit in a 20 liter dry bag with room for a change of clothes or a pair of down booties and down hood. I've camped down to zero and when it is very hot.

    Hammock for me whenever possible.
  7. Dan Alexander

    Dan Alexander still alive and well

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    how does the RR work with the Tensa, lines on the RR seems too long to work well IMO. Amok works well with the stand but getting in and out of the thing are best left to someone from Cirque Du Soleil.

    Lots of room in the Amok XL for side sleeping BTW
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  8. Mumbles24

    Mumbles24 Been here awhile Supporter

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    The RR works in the Tensa, but not as well as the Blackbird gathered end. If I have to bring the stand, I will probably swap to the Blackbird.
  9. Dan Alexander

    Dan Alexander still alive and well

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  10. Mumbles24

    Mumbles24 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Point number 300 for me in favor of my Warbonnet Ridgerunner is that when it is really cold or nasty outside...I can pee out of my hammock without having to go in a bottle or get out of bed.
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  11. Dan Alexander

    Dan Alexander still alive and well

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  12. AustinRT

    AustinRT Been here awhile

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    Ok you know that is hardly any different than laying a stream right there in your tent vestibule right?
  13. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z I'm serious. Supporter

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    I pee out my tent all the time. I have a two-door tent, and I use one as sort of a "back door." And I don't have vestibules. Get up at night, kneel out the back door and take care of business.
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  14. Mumbles24

    Mumbles24 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Pee out the side you are not using for entry and exit. We do know how to not piss into the wind or piss into our own shoes, right? Hate the hammocks if you want. There really is no reason. I don't hate your tents. I don't hate my tents.
  15. Oddfellow

    Oddfellow Beasty Rider Supporter

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    Best of both worlds? New from Kammok, the Sunda 2.0, Converts from 2 man tent to 1 person hammock quickly.
    [​IMG]
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  16. AustinRT

    AustinRT Been here awhile

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    That sounds exciting. I hope one person gets some kind of warning though.
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  17. 805gregg

    805gregg Long timer

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    My experience with hammocks is, I was camping in my tent on Santa Cruz Island, across the way a group set up their camp, one had a hammock, boy did that look comfortable, well we went to sleep, and in my tent I slept like a baby. The next morning when I got up, the hammock guy was sleeping on the picnic table, a good warning about hammocks, plus I sleep on my side, as most back Dr's recommend and in CA. there are many great camping spots with no trees to use, but a tent can be set up anywhere, no trees needed.
  18. Mumbles24

    Mumbles24 Been here awhile Supporter

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    As with anything there is a learning curve. I'm going to suggest picnic table guy was too drunk to find his hammock and could not have found the zipper to get in his tent. Hammocks are great. Tents are great. Hang your own hang, pitch your own pitch and ride your own ride.
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  19. dmason

    dmason goofball

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    A tent provides a semi-secure to place to store riding gear for the night, keeping it dry and away from raccoons.
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  20. dredman

    dredman Dirty Moto-Tourist

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    I hang my gear from the ridgeline if raining. You should keep those tacos & burgers out of your gear and the racoons should leave them alone? :)