Why is my new bike's seat so bad?!?!

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by lilmonkey, Jul 30, 2010.

  1. lilmonkey

    lilmonkey Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2010
    Oddometer:
    341
    I'm in Chicago.

    After reading....the Tourtechs don't get the best press, but it's definitely an option if I can't locate it.

    Wish I could find more info on the Corbin seats. Coming from years of Hondas, I've been a Corbin guy forever. In know they are hard to break in , but are very comfy...
    #21
  2. lilmonkey

    lilmonkey Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2010
    Oddometer:
    341
    Here is my new custom, heated Corbin. Went with them because of my prior experiences with them...seat is very comfortable (for me). None of the numbing pain I was having with the stock seat.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    #22
  3. ecce

    ecce Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    129
    Location:
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Fun reading about ppl buying new seats after a demo ride... :)

    I get a sore ass when riding bikes period.. Unless you install one of the sofa seats the elders are using. Preferably with some fur on as well... Or the net of small wodden balls. Probably great for road safety and handling!!
    #23
  4. bumblebee14

    bumblebee14 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2010
    Oddometer:
    78
    Location:
    Kentucky
    My dealer recommended going to a local upholsterer and getting the stock seat rebuilt. He said they would be able to do it custom to my arse crack. Haven't checked on a price yet but might be a good option.
    #24
  5. huckleberry

    huckleberry BACK ROAD BOMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,108
    Location:
    N.E. Pa.
    well i'll throw in my 2 cents---I got the tt high and like it, better for the knees,flatter,(which i think is a major part of the stock seats problem) and easy to move around on. It is not a lazyboy but if you do get uncomfy just stand for a few min. and start all over again! pretty good seat i think.
    #25
  6. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Oddometer:
    5,745
    Location:
    Grand Valley, Colorado
    He-he.......Ikke kun amerikanerne........ The thickness.....density...can be argued as personal preference....... But it`s the slope forward....that is really bad. Winter starting to set in in DK yet??????

    :thumb:thumb

    Erling
    #26
  7. TripleDaddy

    TripleDaddy Hoping my skills exceed my horsepower

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,278
    Location:
    Westfield, IN by US 32 and Shady Nook
    Do you think we can get the same people that make Select Comfort beds (the one's with the Sleep Number Setting) to make a seat? This is my first post, and I'm just giving away million dollar ideas :D
    #27
  8. Ceri JC

    Ceri JC UK GSer

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,462
    Location:
    All over, usually Wales or England
    Ditto (okay, not exactly 666, but give or take 10 miles and minus 5 hours). The stock seat on the F800GS is one of the better stock seats in motorcycling IMO, particularly for an offroad-styled bike. Still seats are a hugely personal thing, so no harm in changing them. I wonder how many people have tried serious mileage on the stock one before chopping it in? Some people seem to order a new seat as soon as (or even before) they get a new bike. Needless bling, maybe?

    Reasons why no one can get a stock seat right?

    -Styling. Number one reason. Far too many people buy bikes based on aesthetics, because bikes are, for most people who can afford to buy brand new ones, toys. The Goldwing-style cruiser sofa-looking things look ludicrous on a dirt bike like the F800GS.
    -Every rider's riding style, position, ergonomics, ass shape, weight, etc. are all subtly different. Each one has an influence on what seat works.
    -Riding purpose. What's good for sitting down to give your legs a rest when offroading isn't good for 10 hours of super slabbing. Adv bikes are arguably the broadest requirements in this respect of any style of bike and hence the biggest compromise.
    -Cost. Less of a factor on BMWs, but on 90%+ of the Jap stuff, everything is built to a cost.
    -Showroom comfort. What feels good sat still in a bike showroom is what sells the bike. What allows you to keep riding for 24 hours usually feels less comfortable when you first sit on it.
    -Most riders don't do the mileage ADV riders do. The fewer miles you do, the less the seat matters. Your typical rider who does a 100 mile jaunt on a Sunday could have a plank of wood and be able to complete the ride, no problem.

    So, with all these factors, the answer is usually an aftermarket seat. Benefits are that you can choose one biased towards where you spend most of your time riding, whether you want the seat higher, lower or in the same place. Given most seats need a degree of breaking in (which IMO, is really mainly for you to get 'bike fit' on their adjusted ergonomics rather than the seat altering dramatically in the first 2000 miles), this means a lot of trial and error if you really want a 'perfect' one.

    Personally, I just wanted something slightly taller (I like tall bikes, improved ergos, etc.) slightly better for long days of slabbing, wouldn't cripple a pillion and that didn't look like something off a mobility scooter. For me, that seat was the Touratech touring higher seat.
    #28