Why is the bike so TALL? (F800GS)

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by Migs, Jan 13, 2010.

  1. The Griz

    The Griz Long timer Supporter

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    Just as a helper, the "clack" noise you're hearing from the front end originates from the floating front brake rotors and only the floating front brake rotors. I've proven this time and time again in many threads. Here is an example:

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=9656428&postcount=17

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=605898&highlight=noise

    Take your hand, grab the silver part of one of the front rotors, and pull and push back and forth. Lots of play right? Exactly. Makes a clack noise right? Exactly. Now, ride over some bumps while applying slight front brake: SILENCE.


    The noise from the rear of the bike is not the center stand or side stand, since they are bumpered with soft rubber, but rather the chain slapping the plastic parts on the swing arm. This bike has a VERY long chain and swing arm. Just step back from the side and take a look at it. This long chain slaps the swing arm a lot on bumpy terrain. Makes it sound like a "sherman tank" as DesertDave put it in another thread!
    #61
  2. Migs

    Migs Sometimes we cry with everything except tears.

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    #62
  3. LavaFrog

    LavaFrog Adventurer

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    as a fellow shorty 31'inseam- the bead rider(60$) helped with dabs & 1foot stops if you didnt go with the low options(as you did.) The beads are not too slippery once they get a little dirty.
    Congrats on the BMW - it was F8 Migs!! time to go get dirty :clap
    #63
  4. Migs

    Migs Sometimes we cry with everything except tears.

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    Thanks! - I'm practicing a lot on pavement now to get a better feel for the bike. It feels a bit top heavy. I'm a little more scared of leaning it over than I am on other bikes. I sure don't want to drop it! I also turned the handlebars a little more towards me and adjusted the controls so I'm not leaning forward as much (minor adjustment).

    -Migs
    #64
  5. AlanI

    AlanI Adventurer

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    CONFIDENCE and POSITIVE THINKING are the keywords here Migs. My last road bike was the BMW R1150R which I owned and rode for the best part of 3 years. I hated the darn thing - in hindsight it was far too heavy for me and as for those extra strong brakes (now discontinued by BMW) I lost all confidence in the blessed thing. Due to this 'scared' to ride it feeling I found that I was always tense which greatly affected my riding ability/style and in all honesty I felt and looked like a complete novice. This was also commented upon by fellow riders following on behind.

    After a few hundred kilometeres of riding the 800GS this lack of confidence slowly began ebbing away - I felt far more relaxed which in turn gave me far more feeling for the bike. Now, several thousand kilometres later, I find myself riding this bike as though it were a bicycle and more in keeping with the experienced rider that I am. A fact now also commented upon by fellow riders.

    So in short - forget about it being top heavy - it's not - and dismiss from your mind any thoughts about falling over. Think positive, relax and ride within the boundaries of your experience and before you know it you'll be getting out of your bike everything that it is capable of. Have fun and enjoy. :D
    #65
  6. Migs

    Migs Sometimes we cry with everything except tears.

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    Talking about heavy bikes: I also have a Harley Davidson Police Special, which is the heaviest Harley's get. It is SOOOO easy to ride and turn it is amazing! The input from hundreds of cops really makes that bike a dream. I can lean it until the crash guard scrapes the floor, and I always feel in control. I want to get that good on the F800GS.
    -Migs
    #66
  7. Kaw4Life

    Kaw4Life Long timer

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    I don't know, maybe it is because 99.975% of all the others are designed for short people.

    Yes I am well over 6' and yes most all other bikes don't fit.
    #67
  8. IQm3

    IQm3 Adventurer

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    Last week I saw at the dealership a lower suspension option for the F800GS. Let me see what’s up with that and I’ll get back to you. :deal
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>Hope it helps :D</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    #68
  9. Migs

    Migs Sometimes we cry with everything except tears.

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    This should be interesting. Please let us know what they did. I can think the front forks could be lowered (by moving the clamping position) but the rear, unless you replace the spring might be a little more difficult.

    I must say that I have a 31 inch inseam and I reach the floor with the balls of both feet. But - and this is a big but - the bike feels very top heavy!

    Migs
    #69
  10. mario33

    mario33 Howling around...

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    I cant repeat that more often - I would never, EVER, NEVER make suspension any lower in my F800GS. I'm as 'small' as 170 cms (dunno how much its in your feet or something :rofl , however judging by my jeans I have 29' inseam I think). I exchanged my seat for lowered one and found that surprisingly comfortable. I can touch the ground with toes of both my feet, quite firmly. I got used to use one leg occassionally if terrain requires. But I will never let my suspension travel to be any lower. Its the other way round - I need more of the suspension control (Bitubo probably).

    To sum up: loosing suspension travel on f800gs is like shortening the wolf's teeth and surely not worth it, even for more comfort. Especially If you ever go off-pavement...
    #70
  11. Migs

    Migs Sometimes we cry with everything except tears.

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    Mario:

    Can you give me a good technical reason why you would not modify the suspension? I'm not contemplating doing it, but most people that say not to only give and emotive reason, not a sound technical one.
    This is an exercise: If say the front fork was clamped a little lower, the bike belly might be a few centimeters closer to the ground (thus more comfortable for the rider). Since it is a dual sport, it might not make so much difference. Would this change make it more dangerous to ride? What do you loose except suspension travel? For me, I never bottom the suspension out so I doubt it would make much difference.

    What do you think?

    Migs
    #71
  12. EnderTheX

    EnderTheX Dirt Rider

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    Hi Migs and Mario, I will venture to answer that question.

    Just like ya'll, I am vertically challenged... I can barely get two toes firmly on the ground with the low seat but I ride my F800GS with the progress Hyperpro springs and heavy fork oil which actually raise the suspension just a tad.

    Now I may look silly at a stop light and I get more comments about how big the bike is but I am glad to have the clearance when I am traveling passes such as Imogene Pass in my latest Colorado ride report. It was a miracle I didn't smash the bike to pieces on the ledges going down the pass on the north side. I have already (several times) crashed my bash plate into the ledges on off road trails here local in Texas with predictable results (bash plate is bent but bike is OK).

    (Yes I have dropped my bike several times because I was not tall enough to hold it upright properly but mostly it was because I lacked the skill or courage to proceed aggressively).

    I would definitely agree that clearance is only useful if you are on difficult trails or performing shenanigans (I can't wheelie well) but I am with Mario... I wouldn't lower my suspension a single mm. :freaky
    #72
  13. tex99999

    tex99999 Sailor

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    This is the F800/650 GS forum?

    Jon
    #73
  14. tex99999

    tex99999 Sailor

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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=btRvVLA0KzM

    Jon
    ps it's an "F" 800, G is single cyl
    #74
  15. Migs

    Migs Sometimes we cry with everything except tears.

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    To clarify: All references are to the F800GS. When this thread started the model reference got screwed up.
    #75