Why is the Crosstourer a flop?

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by Mattbastard, Dec 10, 2019.

  1. MidlifePanic

    MidlifePanic Been here awhile

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    what do the things cost in US?
  2. MidlifePanic

    MidlifePanic Been here awhile

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    and what is the top end on it? is it governed?
  3. Cajunhawg

    Cajunhawg Adventurer

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    Don’t know about governed, but motor stars to lose its pull at about 120 mph.
  4. Thumpercrazee

    Thumpercrazee Long timer

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    Cost varies in the US but many dealers are selling brand new 2017 VFRX's with manual transmission for about 10,000.00. But demand is steadily growing and with it comes higher prices. The Honda dealer in Deland, Florida has been selling quite a few and is a great dealer to work with.
  5. Desk_Jockey

    Desk_Jockey Adventurer Supporter

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    Yes, doesn't feel like it hits a limiter, just starts losing pull. I managed 124 with sidecases on. Satisfied my curiousity; I don't need to find the max again.

    That was my experience with them also. Wish they were a little closer to me so I could have them service the bike as well.
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  6. WeegieBored

    WeegieBored Been here awhile

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    Limited to 144/5mph on speedo, 130mph on GPS. Will sit there all day. Rarely used, but still wish it was not there. Apparently it IS there because of the hard panniers.
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  7. showkey

    showkey Long timer

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    The supply in the US of left over 2017 models should be drying up soon.........may have already happens on the DCT.
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  8. Mattbastard

    Mattbastard Lazy ass

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    How was their actual pricing compared to what they show on Cycletrader? I'm sick of clickbait pricing on listings from dealerships.
  9. Desk_Jockey

    Desk_Jockey Adventurer Supporter

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    It's still a new bike from a dealer, so there will be the usual fees and hefty sales tax. They worked up an OTD price and we negotiated from there. My sales sheet shows all those fees intact but the price of the bike at less than advertised.

    They also insist that you use Honda financing to get the sale price. I had a blank check with me from my credit union with a slightly lower rate, but decided not to open another front in the negotiation and went with Honda.

    PM me if you want specifics.
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  10. Thumpercrazee

    Thumpercrazee Long timer

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    They were straight up with me and very good to work with. It was a very professional shop with professional staff. I bought all the extras I wanted and felt they were reasonable.
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  11. showkey

    showkey Long timer

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    This financing game is very common in all vehicle purchases.........dealers get an financing “incentive“ * ( aka $$$) on every contract. All the car manufacturers are playing that game. The other game is service contracts and extended warranty sales at time of sale. Example.....GM offers $1000 “discount“ for using GM financial.

    * They make more or all their money on the sale on the incentives and add ons.
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  12. Motogasoline

    Motogasoline Been here awhile

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    I test rode a 1200x. It was incredibly fast and I loved the windshield. To me it came down to the seat. It just wasnt a seat for me. The bike also seems more street oriented than an s10. Maybe thats why they don't sell as well?
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  13. Coolvirgo54

    Coolvirgo54 Adventurer

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    The CT is by far the best bike I have ever owned. Last bike was an Ultra Classic and before that everything from CBR to Ducatis, KTM, GSXR. Been riding for 50 years. CT is the most amazing tourer and mild dirt road bike. The weight disappears when you open the throttle. Did a 1700km run from Bunbury to Karratha last year non-stop except for fuel. I'm 66 and the seat wasn't a problem. You can always buy an aftermarket seat if your butt is such a tender thing. The CT has a cult following in some parts of the world especially Europe. Honda never promoted this bike. It's kinda one of their best kept secrets. Possibly the most reliable bike ever built - there is a guy in Europe has done over 500,000km without the engine coming apart. regularly posts a photo of his speedo on a CT page on FB.
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  14. kaertner

    kaertner Long timer

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    I moved from a CT to a KTM 1290 SA (2015). The KTM was light years ahead of the CT in nearly every way. The only thing I ended up liking about the CT was the DCT, fantastic piece of engineering. However, the weight, average performance, total lack of factory fitted extras and rubbish suspension were the reasons I sold it. The KTM came from the factory as standard fitment, heated grips, centre stand, TPMS, semi active suspension, 30l tank, cruise control, heated rider & passenger seats and much more power, both torque and HP. Reliability? Exactly the same as the CT, zero issues in 4 years & 25,000kms, brilliant bike. I sold it due to lack of use when I moved to anther country and kept it in it's original country due to logistical reasons. Got 70% of it's new value after 4 years by selling it back to my original dealer! Much better residuals than the CT. DCT is very good though, would love it on one of my future bikes.
  15. Coolvirgo54

    Coolvirgo54 Adventurer

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    25000 km in 4 years. So you havent done any serious long distance touring which is what the CT was designed for. I do that in under a year and approaching 100k since 2016. 25000k in 4 years does not qualify as reliability. 500k, yes 500k(500,000km) not 50k in 6 years without opening the motor qualifies as reliable as per our friend from Poland. Not saying the KTM isn't a great bike, it is but is designed for a very different purpose to the CT. I regularly load the CT to well over 500kg with pillion and luggage and it simply couldnt care less. Not too many bikes can handle that year after year and still have buggerall maintenance costs. I fitted fully integrated aftermarket cruise to mine, but left the suspension alone as its fine for what its designed for.
  16. kaertner

    kaertner Long timer

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    The KTM 1290 SAT is a long distance touring bike, the same as the CT. Value, features and fun - for me were far better with the KTM. Since I've owned both and clearly you haven't then I think I'm more qualified on the subject of comparison with regards these 2 bikes. The title of this thread says it all.
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  17. Coolvirgo54

    Coolvirgo54 Adventurer

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    Whoa! Don't be so sensitive. There are many long distance touring bikes. I found the seat height on my last KTM way too high for me. Not an adventure model. I persevered for a bit but sold it in the end. For what they are designed for the current KTM adventure range are top of the heap. They are a true adventure bike with good on road and off road capabilities. The CT is an "adventurised" VFR1200F - same frame, same engine detuned but with much higher torque rise, different forks tupperware and riding position, marginally more suspension travel. The CT wasn't designed to compete with the KTM any more than a KLR or even ST1300 was. Unfortunately they fit into a fairly narrow market sector, but in that sector they have become a cult bike. Sales wise they were a flop but for the purpose I want a bike for now after 50 years of riding, they are the best of the best and here is why.

    1. Maintenance and servicing costs are tiny, really important for serious long distance riders. Mostly they don't need valve clearance adjustment for at least 100,000km. Cost of ownership is incredibly insignificant even with 60,000km/year like our Polish friend.
    2. Shaft drive. Power loss but no drive maintenance at all except for 50k oil change.
    3. Heavy at 275kg. Riding in extreme conditions - 90kph buffeting cross winds, rain, high speed gravel work. The weight and momentum plant the bike on the road and greatly reduce fatigue.
    4. Rider ergonomics. It's the most relaxed ride I have ever had. Gear changing is almost optional as it pulls away smoothly in 6th gear from under 2000rpm. Riding position is perfect for me.
    5. Towing. I occasionally tow a camper trailer grossing 270kg. With pillion and luggage weight tops out at over 800kg. The CT simply doesn't care and is totally stable and predictable. My Ultra Classic struggled.
    6. Fun factor. The CT is not a sports bike but quick enough and nimble enough to have fun in the twisties.
    7. Longevity. Even if you clock huge distances you can keep the bike for many years without any problems.
    8. Price. I bought mine for $10,000 in concourse condition a couple years ago at 18000km. I'll probably keep it for another 10 years. Even if i use it as a garden ornament after that its cost me buggerall.
    9. Simplicity. All it has is ABS and rudimentary traction control. Traction control is essential otherwise it picks up the front wheel every time you take of at the lights. I don't want or need other electronic aids apart from my aftermarket cruise control. My riding style doesn't warrant it.
    10. Dealer on every corner and parts are cheap should the need arise. Many parts common to other Honda models.

    Some of the things I mentioned as pluses for me are serious negatives for probably most riders which is likely why it was a sales flop. Honda marketing was another. I had never heard of the CT before I bought mine.
    30 years ago I would never have entertained a bike like this. Multistrada or KTM if I was that young today probably so long as I could touch the ground. Used to love my Ducatis. Loved my KTM 520 too, what a blast. Geared it to 200kph and fitted a rear sprocket with cush drive built into it to protect the gearbox on the tarmac. On road, off road its amazing what 55hp and 113kg bike weight with great suspension and handling will do.
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  18. ridewv

    ridewv Been here awhile

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    What I liked about my 2017 VFR1200X DCT was the strong V4 motor, good w/o being to much wind protection, shaft drive, DCT, good fit and finish.

    But I recently traded it on a *slightly* used 2019 KTM1090 Adventure R with only 64 miles. The main reasons were weight and suspension, with pretty abrupt throttling as an annoyance. While the CT handles pretty well, a pound is still a pound and it had 630 of them. Pushing it around or backing it out of the garage or parking space was a chore and I was always worried I'd drop it. The 1090 is no lightweight but being lighter by over 100# makes it much easier.
    When I first rode my new VFR1200X I was surprised how poor the suspension was and fiddling with the adjustments offered little improvement. The front was jarring over patched pavement, potholes, dirt/rock roads. The rear was less so but still bad and seemed under sprung for my 180lb. It's not just me many CT owners complain of the suspension. I think Honda should have put better suspension under their premium adventure bike. Marc Parnes even had the suspension reworked on the new CT he purchased but last I read he just gave up and was selling the bike.

    The suspension on the KTM 1090R is quite a contrast. On dirt roads, bad paved roads, rocky roads, it just glides over them and always feels composed. And being considerably lighter it's easier to ride briskly through multiple tight turns.

    Starting with a VFR1200 motor and chassis I don't believe Honda engineers could do much about the weight but had they spec'd top shelf forks and shock, and incorporate spring rates for those sold here to correctly work for the "average American" say 170-220 lb, and included cruise, I think it would have been better received as a nice heavy weight touring bike that wouldn't beat you up on poor roads.

    I imagine maintenance costs should be similar but I have little doubt the CT would be more reliable long term than a KTM, if that was paramount I would have kept the Honda. But lighter weight, compliant suspension, and overall fun to ride factored more in my decision.
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  19. twinrider

    twinrider Pass the catnip

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    Yup, odd they went through all that effort but didn't at least include cruise and ESA or at least high spec fully adjustable suspension. Might not have been a GS beater but would have given the Super Tenere some competition.