Will a "speed bump" across my driveway using cold-set asphalt repair material survive?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by spin10k, Nov 7, 2019.

  1. spin10k

    spin10k Long timer

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    Will an ~2 inch high speed bump made of the "asphalt repair in a bag" stuff harden and remain stuck to an asphalt driveway? I've thought of using one of those bolt-down plastic speed bumps, but due to the length, that would cost me around $500 + shipping.

    This stuff is made to fill in holes, so I don't know if it will simply "squish" out of the way if I try to build it up into a hump.

    (It's a long story having to do with management of water that comes down my driveway, that I want to intercept before it gets to my house, but I'll spare you the details.)

    TIA


    [​IMG]
    #1
  2. Motopsychoman

    Motopsychoman Not a total poseur Supporter

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    How long does it need to be? There appear to be many sources for speed bumps made out of recycled rubber (tires). Seem to cost from $10 to $20 per foot.

    I'd be concerned with summer heat melting a hump made out of soft patch. Have you considered using Sakrete instead?
    #2
  3. spin10k

    spin10k Long timer

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    Needs to be about 26 feet long.

    Details:

    26' is the approximate width of the area where my driveway meets the street - the idea would be to put it across the driveway, approximately parallel to the street, to prevent water that comes down the street from turning down into my driveway. I used to have a hump there, made by the previous guys who re-did the asphalt on the street, but just yesterday the street was done again, and these guys put so much new asphalt on there that my old hump is now gone. Had I known that they were going to be re-doing the street I would have arranged for them to do it, but it was a surprise, and now they're gone. (It's a private subdivision, and we hire the paving companies to do the work for us.)

    I have thought about Sakrete, but haven't ever used it for anything, and didn't know how much trouble it would be to make and form it. (or if it would stick to asphalt) My quick calculations say that I'd need around 3-5 ft^3, depending on the cross-section of the hump.
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  4. spin10k

    spin10k Long timer

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    At $10 / foot I think I might go for it, depending on shipping cost.

    I couldn't find anything that inexpensive.
    #4
  5. Beezer

    Beezer Long timer Supporter

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    how about splitting some ABS pipe (tablesaw) fill it with goop, let it cure, flip it over and spike it down. or, use the half pipe as a mold for concrete.... probably want some mesh in there too. just a wag...
    #5
  6. PaulTim2000

    PaulTim2000 Been here awhile

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    I was going to suggest splitting some scaffold pole or similar, bolting it down and covering it with asphalt repair to smooth of the transitions from drive to 'hump'
    #6
  7. AlpineRAM

    AlpineRAM PartsChaser

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    For temporary installations we use old fire hose filled with sand.

    For a longer term solution you can fill the hose with fiber concrete, form it and after curing time bolt it down.
    #7
  8. Yinzer Moto

    Yinzer Moto aka: trailer Rails Supporter

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    The cold patch is not going to be waterproof. It will be porous and the water will run through it. It will divert water during large storms.
    I would be looking at cutting the driveway with a saw and installing a drain across it.
    #8
  9. Granitic

    Granitic Backcountry rider

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    Cold patch has gotten sophisticated in recent decades. It is tough but pliable to withstand temperature extremes: "Cold asphalt is not dependent upon warm weather. Highway repair crews like cold asphalt because it retains it pliable properties when the temperature drops, so it can be used in northern climates well into the fall and even early winter months."

    It is certainly not porous because many municipalities use it to fill potholes.

    Sakrete will crack quickly in MO winter conditions.
    #9
  10. Wkendwrench

    Wkendwrench Professional Lurker

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    This!
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  11. stormdog

    stormdog Long timer

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    Cold patch will be fine. Use a propane blow torch from harbor freight hooked to a bbq grill tank to warm up and dry the road bed then apply the bagged stuff.
    #11
  12. Motopsychoman

    Motopsychoman Not a total poseur Supporter

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    Check traffic supply places.
    #12
  13. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    We had the same problem. I dug out a shallow trench - 6" deep at worst, dropped in some geo textile which got covered in cobble. Then wrapped the textile over and tucked it down, finished off with pebbles to match the rest of the drive. The down hill end I buried some storm drainage pipe and led that away to daylight under some trees and bushes.

    We now don't get the massive pooling every time it rains. Only down side is the greenery grows a lot faster now.

    Whole job took less than a morning, using stuff we had around and a length of scrounged 110mm pipe.
    Additional upside is I was forced to repair the big wheel barrow, which has come in very useful this autumn.
    #13
  14. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    A pic to illustrate the after, you can see where the pipe went under the hedge, next to the log.
    upload_2019-11-8_18-53-34.png
    The neighbour has a large hump, which wears away, leaving big puddles
    #14
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  15. Beezer

    Beezer Long timer Supporter

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    "The neighbor has a large hump".... excellent Smithers
    #15