Will this tool work? Flywheel removal

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by Klrhani, Aug 3, 2017.

  1. Klrhani

    Klrhani Been here awhile

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    View attachment 925691 Ok so I've had alittle difficulty to say the least. I ended up stripping the threads on my doner motors 'upgraded flywheel'. That's another story which I'll be using a case splitting tool to get that one off. But for my actually bikes 'old style' flywheel I don't want to mess it up second time around, ha. Will this tool work?

    I noticed the OEM BMW tool has a nib on the end and the one I got from motion pro doesn't.

    So my question to you all is had anyone actually, physically used the one pictured below to remove their f800gs flywheel. The only reason I'm being so specific about this is because I can't afford to mess this up a second time. I notice that there are multiple layers in the center hole. They are different diameters so I believe the end of the motion pro puller might stop against one of them instead of making it all the way down to the crank. (just a speculation)

    Again if anyone has used the non oem one let me know because that'll put an end to all this speculation.

    Thanks!

    FullSizeRender 2.jpg FullSizeRender.jpg IMG_1051.JPG

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  2. Reaver

    Reaver Why am I still here?

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    Everything you see beyond the threads is the crank. That nub on the BMW tool DOES NOT push anything. It's more like a locator. I don't see why the other tool won't work.

    I've removed 6 of these now. I suspect you didn't have enough heat. On my spare loose engine I used 2 torches then quickly removed the flywheel almost effortlessly. More heat is less effort. You need to melt the GLUE holding it on, the Loctite. I held the breaker bar and my (old) friend held the engine. 3 seconds later I was looking for a place to toss the hot potato. Barely a grunt.

    The threads are only for removal so use a lot of heat trying to get the damaged one off. 2 torches min.

    Good luck.
    #2
  3. thleon

    thleon Theo

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    Hello, i have got a new design flywheel from ebay in order to replace it on a 2010 model.
    I 've already bought a bmw puller from motorworks and a tdc lock bolt.

    You mention using two torches in order to break the loctite.
    The manual says to use an electrical blow torch at 100 degrees Celsius and as I understood i will have no luck removing it with that method.

    Is there a danger using too much heat for the crank using an open flame torch?

    Thanks
    #3
  4. NCD

    NCD Dirty Hairy Supporter

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    FWIW I used a regular ol propane torch when I did mine. But give it time! The flywheel is a big ass heat sink that kills your progress. When in doubt do it the way @Reaver says cause he's more smarter.
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  5. Reaver

    Reaver Why am I still here?

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    Hola thleon.

    The danger of too much heat is that you may ruin the crankshaft seal. They are tough but still. 2 torches used together to heat the flywheel quickly to release the loctite and not heat up the whole engine. An electrical heat gun would take a long time. I used what I had handy.
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  6. MCMXCIVRS

    MCMXCIVRS Long timer

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    There is no seal on the crank end, its inside the cover and has no need of a seal. As others have stated, it takes a lot more heat than BMW indicates. I used a propane torch also and the Motion Pro tool in question. I kept tightening in down while applying more heat until it finally popped free. I've done both mine and my wife's bike with no ill effects.
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  7. thleon

    thleon Theo

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    Thanks for your answers. Approximately how much heating time do I need using one propane torch?

    And one more info, how much cure time loctite 648 needs before I start the engine?
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  8. MCMXCIVRS

    MCMXCIVRS Long timer

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    I used a temperature probe on my multimeter measuring the temperature of the rotor until I reached the recommended 100 C. Then I tightened the puller tool in and continued the heating-tightening sequence until it popped loose. It still took a lot of force using a long breaker bar on the puller. You will need to install the lock pin on the crank to keep it from turning.

    As for cure time, not too long. By the time you get it all reassembled and done it should be fine. Just be sure to clean the old Loctite off completely and make sure there is no oil residue at all on the surfaces. I like to use a bit of brake clean to get the oil all off. And don't use too much Loctite as excess could get into the one way clutch for the starter gear.
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  9. thleon

    thleon Theo

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    So I did the flywheel swap yesterday. I heated the old one with an electrical blow torch for about 5 minutes and I used a large socket wrench and the flywheel popped out with a crack noise.
    After I cleaned the old Loctite, I applyed a thin layer of new 648 Loctite on the crank and much more on the bolt threads.
    Finally I used a new gasket for the cover.
    I waited for 24 hours for the locktite to cure and I fired today the engine.

    I am not sure but I think that the engine revs faster on the road. Have you noticed any difference?
    #9
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