Wind noise and bikes. On the verge of giving up riding.

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by Alexander B, Apr 1, 2017.

  1. KingOfFleece

    KingOfFleece SplitWeight(tm) waterproof seat covers Supporter

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    Mack's are silicone putty. They work well. In high temps mine will get soft and a bit sticky-so much so that I don't use them over 85 degrees F.
    Mighty Plugs are beeswax, cotton, and lanolin. Comfortable and do a decent job of blocking noise. With a bit of care they last several weeks. BTW, do not drop the Mack's as most crud will stick to the silicone-ugh.

    Heros and most every other foam plug provide excellent noise reduction. They do not offer a "high fidelity" cut and some find the muffle effect bothersome.
    They do, however, offer the highest NR rating and for some that's critical.
    AZbiker likes this.
  2. Mobiker

    Mobiker Long timer Supporter

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    I've tried Mack's and Mighty's both and for whatever reason they didn't work very well for me. Lots of people like them. I still have some around, maybe I'll try them again.
  3. Beemer Dood

    Beemer Dood Been here awhile

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    I purchased some of the beeswax plugs, specifically "The Mighty Plugs," but I tried them around the house and they're 'too good at excluding all noise' for my taste. I had a feeling of complete isolation from all but the loudest sounds. I'd never want that much suppression of sound on the bike unless there was no other way I could ride.

    I want to hear my engine, the sound of the tires on the road, cars approaching, my music, my Intercom, and anything else that might impact my riding experience. These plugs didn't work for me. But I gave them to a friend who swears by them. He calls them the best plugs he's ever worn.
  4. Nosotros Racing

    Nosotros Racing Long timer Supporter

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    I'm currently running this setup;
    [​IMG]
    I made the lower extension and spoiler wing for the Madstad, making it the same size as it's predecessor. The bottom and top spoiler are actually made from the old screen, a Cal Sci tall which cracked from too much flexure caused by 18-wheelers. Between this and the noise-cancelling earbuds. it's a fairly calm and quiet ride approaching triple digits. This pic has everything at full height. Lots of adjustability in the screen and the spoiler
    KingOfFleece likes this.
  5. Nosotros Racing

    Nosotros Racing Long timer Supporter

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    This is me behind the Cal Sci pre-spoiler.
    [​IMG]
  6. Nosotros Racing

    Nosotros Racing Long timer Supporter

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    The Cal-Sci with spoiler. Basically the same height as the extended Madstad.
    [​IMG]
  7. AllSeasonRider

    AllSeasonRider Wandering, maybe a little lost...

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    I've not ridden every bike, tried every windscreen, wore every helmet, nor tested every earplug, but I have ridden, tried, wore and tested a lot and here's my experience - I'm also very sensitive to noise and already suffer from tinnitus:

    No windscreen is almost the best you're going to get. Clean air, no matter the speed (within reasonable road speeds) is always quieter than any amount of turbulence. A few years back I fitted an aftermarket windscreen to my bike to try to make it more comfortable. By the middle of the second day, I stopped into a truck stop, bought a hacksaw, and cut it in half. 2 weeks in, I borrowed a drill and put a bunch of holes in it to try to quell the turbulence that remained. When I got home, I threw it in the trash and have never been happier.

    In my experience, air does not flow around anything like people seem to suggest - those illustrations that Cal Sci puts out, for example, are pure horsesh*t. The wind might get shifted an inch or two beyond the edge of the screen, but after that it's flowing straight back and full of turbulence. Put another way, I've never experienced any windscreen that was able to flow the wind up and over my helmet if the top of the screen was below the top of my helmet. That means:
    • A) You either need a screen that's low/small enough that the wind blast hits comfortably below your helmet... I've found that anything above mid-chest just makes for a very noisy ride. Or,
    • B) You need something massive - if you're not fully sitting behind it and looking through it, it's not big enough.
    I think the quietest bike I've ever ridden was a GL1800 Goldwing, sitting behind that massive fairing and windscreen. Yeah, it's a LOT of motorcycle, and not necessarily my idea of a good time, but if I absolutely had to have a quiet ride I'd be looking at something like that. Not sure if the new Goldwings or the BMW 1600s would be similar, I've not had a chance to ride either.

    Some people seem to have to have luck with aftermarket screens or those clip-on spoilers, but if I'm being honest, I've never experienced an improvement with any of them. That Goldwing aside, I've never - and I mean that literally - sat behind a windscreen I liked. Some are better than others, but they are all varying degrees of satan's spawn and the world would be better off with them having never existed.
    dedave, MZ5, SilentRay and 4 others like this.
  8. Seth S

    Seth S My avatar is ok. Your screen is broken

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    The most enjoyable riding I've had from a quiet and low wind point of view is when I have tail wind or get in behind a truck in just the right way so that at speed you are in a little 0 pressure zone. it doesn't happen often and its quite surreal to be going 75 mph and it feels like dead air all around.
    dedave and 72 Yamaha RD350 like this.
  9. Matt-J2

    Matt-J2 Been here awhile

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    So I'm on a different bike now, DRZ400SM vs my R3. Some changes I've noticed, especially over my 200mi ride this past weekend:

    Some speeds are better, not sure if it's less turbulence or what but it's better.
    It's much better if I sit further back and more upright.
    However, sitting that upright means my head is straight. My helmet (Shoei RF1200) is quieter if I then tilt my head forward. Seeing through my glasses is harder that way.
    If I open my mouth a little bit, it gets even quieter. Not sure if this just closes a gap around my jaw, shifts the chin curtain, or maybe changes some resonance with my jawbone and makes the fit better, but it worked.

    Downside is all the above makes it less comfortable and more tiring to ride. So...I think I need a different helmet, maybe more of a touring style or something made to be upright. I knew helmets were listed certain ways but this is the first time I think I've had a noticeable difference.
  10. Hobbomock

    Hobbomock I's wide open

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    Warning:

    This advice will seem to be ridiculous at first and won't work for everyone but has helped me tremendously:

    Tapping Remedy for Tinnitus
    Dr. Jan Strydom of A2Z of Health, Beauty and Fitness.org recommends an unconventional technique for treating tinnitus that involves tapping on the back of the head in a particular manner 1


    This is a verified and trusted source


    A2Z of Health, Beauty and Fintess.org: How to stop ringing in the Ears
    Goto Source
    .
    The afflicted person places the palms of the hands to cover the ears with the fingers resting on the back of his head. The fingers should point to the area at the base of the skull where it meets the neck.

    The next step is to place the index fingers on top of the middle fingers and firmly snap the index finger off the middle finger and onto the back of the head making a drumming sound. The palms of the hands should remain covering the ears. The tapping should be repeated about 50 times, and this should be done several times a day. Based on the severity of the tinnitus, some people have achieved lasting relief using this method.
    Alexander B likes this.
  11. Beemeup

    Beemeup 1978 R100/7

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    If your tinitus is from blocked ears from wax buildup that might work but usually it's from damage to the cell receptors in the cochlea. No tapping will help that. Numerous things can cause the damage but it's usually from too much noise for too long.
    dtysdalx2 and Alexander B like this.
  12. timeOday

    timeOday Long timer

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    This is not my experience.

    I agree with you that a mid-sized windscreen is worse than none. I've had the same experience cutting a screen down.

    But you don't need to be looking through the windscreen to get calm air either. Having the windscreen a couple inches below your line of sight works. On my aircooled R1200GS I have the Givi Airflow plus the winglets (which I didn't start out with, but found them necessary) and it is good. In the evenings I often take my wife on a little ride with our half-helmets on if the air is nice we can hear each other loud-talking at 55.
    With fullface helmets and noise-cancelling earbuds (Bose QC20) plugged into Sena communicators we can have comfortable discussions crusing on the freeway. Also for longer rides when the air is calm I really like to leave my faceshield open and the windscreen lets me do that.

    I do agree that if there's much of a sidewind or turbulence from trucks or sometimes just the heat of the day on the freeway, only the huge bubble behind a goldwing-type windscreen will really do the job.
  13. Hobbomock

    Hobbomock I's wide open

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    That's not been my experience. It's a helpful technique but only if you try it.
  14. Beemeup

    Beemeup 1978 R100/7

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    What if I pat my head while spinning and rubbing my belly?
  15. Hobbomock

    Hobbomock I's wide open

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    Then, uhm, you'd look like a child.
  16. Beemeup

    Beemeup 1978 R100/7

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    Instead of sounding like one?
  17. AllSeasonRider

    AllSeasonRider Wandering, maybe a little lost...

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    I tried the head tapping thing, made no difference for mine. I'm a little suspect given I can't find much about it anywhere else, but if it works for someone then I'm glad it provides some relief, even if temporary. Thankfully, mine isn't too bad - a ceiling fan or an open window is enough to mask it.
    Hobbomock likes this.
  18. Lowrider49

    Lowrider49 Adventurer

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    I ran the same spoiler on a V Stream and left side cracked passing a small van and broke completely before I could find a safe spot to stop. I cut a piece the same side out of Macrolon and will bend it to the contour of the shield and bolt it on with 4" about the V Stream and see how that work. I can cut it down if needed. The V Stream does a good job of getting the wind off my chest but it still hits me right in the eyes which is very uncomfortable after a half hour or so.

    Loved my ST 1300 no bad air and I seldom got wet...too bad it weighed so much.
    riddare likes this.
  19. ilmothefinn

    ilmothefinn Last snail in the coffin

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    Now that looks like a Great Screen! Just don't tell me someone assembled forward controls and bull bar (in a SDRGT)!

    Ok, not meant as negative - that shows SDRGT is a bike of many uses!
  20. Gone Troppo

    Gone Troppo Somewhat bemused observer

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    I have a SD GT and have found the standard screen fine...