Wondering about which Touring/Dualsport to use in Mex/C.A/S.A.

Discussion in 'Latin America' started by Zokambaa, Dec 29, 2009.

  1. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

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    At the moment there are several KLR's and DR650's for sale IN Latin America
    for pretty reasonable prices. Go to HUBB (Horizon's Unlimited) and go to For Sale forum. Fly into Colombia and ride! Central America is a pain with all the borders. Starting in Colombia or Argentina is a good option.

    These bikes are mostly California registered, so can be easily transferred to you, yes, even as a Canadian.
    #61
  2. markharf

    markharf Been here awhile

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    Who in hell would pay $9000 for a five year old bike with miles on it....which only costs $5000 new? You need to think critically about your search parameters.

    The suggestion to look on HU for bikes already in S.A. is a good one. I know the Danish couple selling their KLR's, currently at Mike's in Cali. They're good people and they took pretty good care of the bikes, including trip prep by Eagle Mike.

    Enjoy!

    Mark
    #62
  3. Zokambaa

    Zokambaa .

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    Thus the reason I don't have one... people are charging insane prices used at the moment... but the new prices aren't too good either..

    Best new prices so far have been for the 650 strom... Dls and KLRs are close in price.. maybe a bit cheaper... but the 2010 models are insanely priced... why in hell do bikes cost almost as much as some cars? or in the case of BMWs and KTMs the same as an average car...

    I'm still looking at all options.. I'd be a bit hesitant about taking a plane trip to colombia or peru to get a bike and find out it is crap and end up with nothing.. or worse having to get some crappy 250 or something...

    By the way.. is it just me or are tourtech products extremely overpriced?

    they wanted a kit for a crappy garmin gpsmap 60csx with essentially a ram mount and a 2 gb memory card for over $1000 what the fU($ is that!?!?!?! I got my Garmin GPSMAP for less than $300 a 4gb memory card for about $20 and a ram mount for about $20 or so... how is that even close to a grand? Screw tourtech... they are not really better than anyone else and so over priced... kind of like BMW and KTM... the bikes may be good.. but not much better but 1/3rd to 1/2 more on the price...

    I'd be ok with paying more if something was sooo much superior to everything else out there.. but when that is not the case.. paying for a name is pretty dumb if you ask me

    #63
  4. markharf

    markharf Been here awhile

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    You sound like you're kind've early on the learning curve. With all due respect, quit complaining about Tourtech prices and go buy the bike of your choice....in the USA, which is simple, or South America, which is somewhat more complicated, or straight off the dealer's lot (as I've done twice now, and never looked back).

    FWIW, even if you buy new it's not like your worries are over; there's properly outfitting and upgrading to be done before your first major journey, and this takes time, costs money, and busts knuckles. There are a lot of advantages to buying slightly used, including the fact that someone else has done all this on your behalf. This can easily compensate for the uncertainties involved in flying someplace unfamiliar in search of a bike.

    That aside, there are plenty of used bikes in California and/or Colombia right now. AFAIK, none of them cost 9 grand.

    enjoy,

    Mark
    #64
  5. crashmaster

    crashmaster ow, my balls!

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    Dont get so hung up on what stuff costs. You will have to pay to play no matter what. You simply have to figure out how much you want to pay.

    About the cost of bikes, a KTM Adventure costs significantly less than a BMW 12GS. When I bought a new KTM I could spend 11 grand on the KTM, or almost 7 grand on a new KLR. That was a no brainer. The big KTM's are easily twice the bike in performance, quality and capability that a KLR is.

    The best thing for your budget is to ride a bike that you already have. Selling it and buying another bike for the trip will probably wind up costing you more money.
    #65
  6. JamesOn2Wheels

    JamesOn2Wheels Banned

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    one example of why prices are high here in Costa Rica, is what amounts to 2 things...the "luxury" or import duties on expensive toys for both Gringos and Latinos - and for example here in CR a lot of that extra "duty" goes to fund the social programs like health care and schools for those that are less culturally advantaged:
    ..and the strangle hold a few families have down here on the import business...
    seems ridiculous sometimes to pay double the price for a BMW or almost double for anything else over 250cc -
    ...according to my friends here and in SA anyone rich enough to buy something that 90% of the people can't even walk near without getting threatening stares, is rich enough to cough up some dough for the pleasure of being able to buy whatever they see anytime they feel like it...
    my apologies to travelling buddies that are on a tight budget....you still have way more than most people down here, and can "fly away" to anywhere when you feel like it

    rant over

    Zig

    sing Ho!...for the life..........:freaky
    #66
  7. ruedaloca

    ruedaloca just me

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    After following these all comments... maybe the best way would be to sell one or two of your bikes, and get at your country a new or used F800GS. You donĀ“t like the big 1200gs, and neither the expensive too KTM 990...KLR just for the trip ...I won't do it, buy the bike for your current planning trip, and keep it for the coming futures trip !!! ...you'll love the bike even more for more roads with you.

    F800GS seems to be the best choice for me :thumb . and for you ? :dunno
    #67
  8. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

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    This is exactly why it makes so much sense to buy in S. America. Most of these bikes are totally set up, ready to ride away on. Some have done a lot of work and spent THOUSANDS on bags, guards, seats and more. Don't let mileage worry you. Talk to the owners and use you gut. Even if you decide NOT to buy, in Cartegena there are always lots of bikes coming and going for sale, rent or buy back. All easy options. Most bikes are going for between $3500 and $4000 USD. Tough to beat that.

    Setting up a bike properly will likely take you 6 months. Lots to learn and experiment with. Why do that? I see EXCELLENT bikes down there with really smart mods done.

    Like Mark says, you're a bit low down on the learning curve. Give yourself some time to learn more, do your research, plan your route and most of all, save your money. Have fun. :freaky
    #68
  9. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

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    This is true. Switching bikes always costs more!
    Loving your ride reports Crash. ?Como anda sus clases en Espanol? ?Te fumes Espanol todavia? :lol3

    If you got a 990 for $11K then you did good. Current MSRP is nearly $15,000 :
    http://www.ktm-parts.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=10990ADV
    Add tax, extras, and that figure quickly jumps up a couple grand. Figure on average, around $17,000 or more?

    2010 MSRP for a BMW R1200GS is also $15,000. Now add extras, tax,
    and these typically end up out the door close to $18,000, according to my BMW salesperson friend.

    On top of that you add up how much is spent specialty Doo Dads to make the thing travel ready. Used KTM 990's can be had for around $10K. Good deal.

    KLR's and DR, near new, can be found EVERYDAY on Craig's list here in California for around $3000 to $4000 USD. I met a guy last week who bought an '09 KLR with UNDER 1000 miles for $3500 USD. I see 2007 to 2009 low mileage DR's everyday in the $3500 range. Even new DR's & KLR's can be bargained for and be had OTD for well under $7000. More like $5000 on the road.

    Also, you can find used KLR's already set up. These are usually a couple years older and have some miles, but many have Thousand in aftermarket crap already on the bike. (Seat, suspension, bags, guards, Doo-Hickey, upgraded wiring/lights, big rotor et al) (I know, your KTM doesn't need any of this stuff, right? Race ready out of the box! ?

    In terms of performance the KTM is stellar. But based on your own experience would you really consider your 990 "reliable"? Remember, I've been reading your Blog! (GREAT!) Seems to me you've had on going, nagging issues almost since Baja.

    I've owned XR's (XL, XR's, XR-L) KLR, and DRZ400, DR650. Close to 100,000 combined miles. Never a failure on any of these bikes. Wait, my '87 XL600 did fry the stator one time in baja. (my fault for running on a dead battery) No, these bikes aren't fast but are cheap and very tough and quite reliable. Tougher than a KTM over tens of thousands of miles, IMHO.
    I've ridden with KTM riders for over 15 years, owned a couple myself.

    They are fun and wonderful bikes. But for getting lost in Latin America, I'd prefer an old nail that is hard to kill, cheap to buy and nobody wants to steal or kill me for. :eek1
    #69
  10. Zokambaa

    Zokambaa .

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    I've thought about doing the buy in Colombia or Peru thing.... do you not run into issues at borders (at least in Central America/Mexico) more so than if you owned the bike in Canada and drove it down, with all your license, registration, insurance all matching to your address/pasport etc...

    I guess if your paperwork is in order you'll be fine, but doesn't it delay things more than normal?




    #70
  11. JamesOn2Wheels

    JamesOn2Wheels Banned

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    Xfiltrate (I think) had a comment on HUBB about problems bringing foreign owned but Chile registered bikes into Peru. Seems they wouldn't and maybe still don't allow it at main borders but into Bolivia first and then ??? seemed to be a possibility.
    Some countries can take a few weeks to get you your official plate and title making crossing almsot impossible until you have said items.
    Mexico - 1 day
    Costa Rica 1 month +
    Peru 2-4 weeks I think

    Zig
    #71
  12. bananaman

    bananaman transcontimental

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    I rode from the US to Argentina with a Panama passport and a US registered bike. It's a non-issue. Ok, it's an issue, but only in the minds of paranoid overthinking never-goin-anywhere-noobs.

    I'll take everything back as soon as the OP noob actually goes somewhere.
    #72
  13. BobLoblaw

    BobLoblaw Comfortably Numb

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    So you can buy a bike sight unseen in say Cartegena for $3500 to $4000.

    It probably needs a load of shit if its at the end of someones tour, like maybe a chain or sprockets or tires or service. How much of a pain in the ass would it be to get all that stuff done in SA. Plus maybe the motorcycle isn't exactly as advertised. You know how it goes , ones man's silk purse is another man's sow's ear.

    Or you can buy a brand new KLR in CO for $4400 and put say $1600 in farkles on it, or buy a used whatever in say CA for a bunch less, take it home, get used to your new ride in familiar surroundings, and get it correctly registered in your name.

    You can then proceed on your way with a minimum of worries and hassle.

    Doesn't make any sense to me to buy a bike in SA. :norton
    #73
  14. Zokambaa

    Zokambaa .

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    I'm looking for info not some blowhard's p!ssy little comments...

    I'd rather not have to turn back at the borders because of some minor issues, I know people have been turned back for all sorts of stupid little things.

    You may have had no problems perhaps you got the right border agent at the right time or at the right place... but I have heard from people whom had issues in Central America going through borders when something didn't match up with their vehicle.

    This will be a huge trip, I'm looking to minimize issues so I don't need your egocentric digs all the time.
    #74
  15. BobLoblaw

    BobLoblaw Comfortably Numb

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    Bananaman chatting with the local officials while adoring bystanders observe his charm and charisma:D

    Hey noob, listen to B'man he offers good advice and a unique sense of humour.

    [​IMG]
    #75
  16. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

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    All fair points Bob. Doing this sort of deal is probably not for the feint of heart or newbs. But it can, and has worked for many travelers. As I said, you have to communicate with the Seller and check your gut. Is he being honest? But flying in with a couple tires, chain, Sprocket and whatever, is no big deal. I've done it. But still, you have to feel this out and get help
    checking out the bike.

    Handing off the title has to be done in "no man's land" at a border. Title change requires owner (seller) to mail title to buyer in California (or use a proxy), they go into DMV, transfer to buyer, who is now on new pink slip, or you can ADD the buyers name and leave original owner on too. Totally legal and can help in this situation. Totally legal.

    Hand off is made, Buyer proceeds to new country and enters using his new title (which has his name on it). Now he is good to go anywhere. Is this strickly legal? Of course not. Does it work? You damn betcha! Can it go wrong? Sure, but usually not if you know what you're doing.

    As far as checking out the bike ahead of time ... well that is what friends are for! There are many active members living in Colombia who frequently help out travelers, Turtleshead Al, Kaiser, and several others who run Bars, Hostels, Bike shops. Also other travelers passing through. Is this risky? Of course it is, but so is riding RTW on a MC:lol3 I tend to trust fellow riders most times until I hear something to reverse my confidence. But this is not for everyone.

    Getting a nice used bike in California is also an excellent option but then you've got lots of farkleing to do, a few months of riding and quite a bit of money to get to S. America. Depends on your time schedule, budget and desires.

    Just pointing out options out there.

    (PS : X filtrate on HUBB runs a BUSINESS and paints a very bleak picture of all this in order to "steer" business towards himself. Ask around in the
    Agentine HUBB community to verify. Not a bad guy at all, and he DOES know the Argentine system. But keep in mind, there are nearly ALWAYS ways around it.:lol3 And every country is different and he does not know the rules & regs for ALL of them. As always, recent, first hand info is always best. )

    :freaky
    #76
  17. bananaman

    bananaman transcontimental

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    Thanks for reminding me about those fucking cop-banditos.

    I wouldn't be chiming in if the OP wasn't spouting such damn ignorance.

    I'm not a blowhard. I'm a wannabe.
    #77
  18. Zokambaa

    Zokambaa .

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    Asking questions is a way of getting info... I've heard from people who had various issues, geting other's experiences and asking questions of people who have experienced various things and there by confirming or disputing comments in a civil fashion is what a forum is about. I can then take all the info with research on my own and form an opinion or course of action.


    You say it is fine to do something because you experienced things one way.. others who've done the same thing have experienced things another... if I can get multiple views I can get a better idea of what to expect and the chances of something happening.

    You don't have to be so confrontational about everything... your way is not the only way... your preferences are not everyone's preferences... your experiences are not always the same as everyone else...

    If I mention I've heard something, be it a 1 time thing or from several sources and you have experienced something else.. all you have to do is cite your experience and why you disagree... you don't have to be insulting



    #78
  19. markharf

    markharf Been here awhile

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    Got some competing agendas in this thread. A few simple observations:

    Anyone who thinks that changing out chain and sprockets is a big deal is probably not going to get very far on their bike. Chains and sprockets, like tires and miscellaneous other stuff, need changing---in South America, in North America, in anyplace you can think of. I'm changing out tires every month or so; chain every four months, sprockets almost as often. No big deal--just part of how things work.

    Anyone who wants to be sure that everything will go smoothly at Central American border crossings should probably stay home. Sometimes it's just not going to be as smooth as you would prefer. People determined to render their motorcycles and their journeys totally predictable......well, I haven't found the magic formula yet, and probably neither will you. Anyone wishing to minimize chances of things getting awkward but not willing to stay home should probably buy a brand new bike at home, outfit it properly, perform all maintenance, carry multiple copies of all paperwork.....and assume that on a trip of any reasonable length the shit will hit the fan at some point, but that like most people they'll find the inner resources to deal with it appropriately and spend the rest of their days bragging about it, elaborating as necessary.

    Buying that new bike is going to be expensive, outfitting it more expensive still. That's life, right? If it's worth it to you, do it; if not, buy used. Don't fret: in the end you'll spend more on parts, service, gas, insurance and other necessary stuff than you ever did on any two or three bikes. In the end, in other words, the purchase price might hardly matter.

    Learning styles differ. Some people like to try to anticipate all possible uncertainties long in advance, often by asking interminable strings of questions on internet forums. Others take the opposite approach, setting off without any apparent clue and learning as they go. And, strange as it may seem, some of the first group conveniently forget this about themselves in retrospect, and spend the rest of their lives ragging on the interminable-askers-of-questions on the very same internet forums. Ain't life grand?

    Just stating the obvious here: no value judgments (this time), no particular agenda. Must be the eternal (almost) daylight here in Ushuaia, where I'm carefully monitoring the surprisingly rapid wear on my three-week-old rear tire, wondering whether it'll last to B.A.

    Mark
    #79
  20. bananaman

    bananaman transcontimental

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    Fresh tires in in Cordoba were bald when I got to BA. Not really bald... flat on the bottom. The rear was flat all the way around, but knobby on the sides. I kept thinking that riding sideways should wear the side-knobs.

    I'm in your second group. I didn't even have a motorcycle license when I bought my R1100RS and rode it around Lake Superior. I'd had a motorcycle license for about a week before I took off for Mexico.

    I had never heard about advrider until I was looking for a GS, and found a link to the flea market. I joined at the end of June, and less than two weeks later I rode to Alaska.

    Fucking up is the best part of an adventure.

    It's funny that you brought up expenses. Pinching pennies only works for guys like Jamie. There's no good way to justify the expense. It's expensive.

    I tell people to plan on spending $15,000 to get to Ushuaia and fly home with the bike, plus or minus a few thousand dollars. At least $30,000 to ride there and back. (Sure, you don't have to pay to ship the bike back, but you're going to have an awful lot more maintenance. Chains and sprokets are cheap compared to re-building motors and frames.)

    I wonder if the OP has read any of the current and archived Ride Reports?
    #80