Wondering about which Touring/Dualsport to use in Mex/C.A/S.A.

Discussion in 'Latin America' started by Zokambaa, Dec 29, 2009.

  1. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

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    Type two would include Dan Walsh, among others. Dan really understands flying fast and staying loose. Then you've got super-anals like Helge Pederson (nice guy, BTW, just very "Nordic").

    How's the weather in Ushuaia? What sort of tires are wearing out so quickly? and a chain/sprockets that lasts four months? Whoa! Gimme Shelter!

    Great comments! Ride safe!:freaky
    #81
  2. Lee C

    Lee C Long timer

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    #82
  3. Zokambaa

    Zokambaa .

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    Thanks,

    Yeah I've been checking their site off and on more recently... I'll be testing out a few bikes through them as soon as winter eases and they start to allow test rides again... The DR650 and the KLR are pretty close in price.. and within range... they used to be selling for mid to high $6000 range



    #83
  4. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

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    This is so typical. The Zen book definitely in order!

    Took me years to lose the Gringo "hurry up and wait" attitude and finally mellow a bit. I'm basically an uptight asshole, but after enough time down south, I become much more tolerable (so I'm told :D) ... and after a few Beers, my Spanish even improves!

    What's the skinny on a Gringo (US/Canada) buying a local bike in Mexico now? I've seen a couple interesting 250's and 400 Honda's down there and a Yamaha or do that looked good.

    Anything else interesting or worth looking at being sold now in Mexico? Prices? Any idea? IVO for non-Mexicans?
    #84
  5. Gustavo

    Gustavo Motociclista Errante

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    Yeah, new bikes are more expensive due to taxation and lack of competition (no bargaining on new bikes typically, list price is what you pay unless they offer a discount). Same is true for most parts, it's expensive to import to Mexico and the relatively small market prevents even the importers from taking chances on keeping large quantities of anything in stock.

    Used bikes are expensive (again, typically, you do run into deals once in a while) because the demand for bikes (especially larger displacement ones) is by far larger than the supply. Used bikes pay lower licensing fees and taxes, so for those on a tight budget, even if they could manage to save enough money to afford a new bike, paying for annual fees (reg, insurance, taxes) is prohibitive, so they prefer to buy used. Bikes like the Tornado and Falcon that are more common may be found at times at good prices used, but having looked for one, I can tell you that often that is not the case. I was ready to buy a new one due to the high asking prices in the region I was looking.


    Gustavo
    #85
  6. loudnlow7484

    loudnlow7484 Adventurer

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    I suppose I'm the odd duck here....... if I were going to buy a bike right now for a trip around SA, I'd grab a Suzuki GS500. I prefer no fairing, but if you got a GS500F, you'd have a pretty protective fairing to make your miles more pleasant.

    I know that GS500's were sold in Brazil, Argentina, and Colombia, but I don't know about anywhere else. At least in those countries, parts should be available locally. The engines are also dead reliable, and you should be able to hunt down crash bars for them since they have been a popular trackday bike. Good MPG, holds 4.5 gal of gas, enough power to get out of your own way (or into trouble). I know I've seen luggage racks for them as well.

    As a bonus, it won't stick out so much down south. They are generic looking enough to blend in with the sea of Yammie Fazers, and Honda Twisters, and the like.

    My $.02, based on nothing but theories. :lol3
    #86
  7. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

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    That's a great bike. I would think it would need suspension work to carry a load and not sure how tough the wheels are. Vstrom wheels are tough, but no idea about the 500. Ground clearance is limited but you could mostly ride around that if careful. Would need a seat and possible reinforced sub frame.

    But certain could work and we see bargain priced used ones around here, very cheap. Totally bullet proof motor/electrics.

    But will it take a beating? Probably!

    Who's gonna be the Beta tester?
    #87
  8. crashmaster

    crashmaster ow, my balls!

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    Holy crap:yikes The dealers in San Diego are blowing the 08 CRF450's out of the shop for close to 5 grand. My buddy just bought two. :rofl
    #88
  9. loudnlow7484

    loudnlow7484 Adventurer

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    GS500 wheels are similar (the front is the same, the rear I'm not sure) to the old GSX-F wheels, and early Bandit 600 wheels. Would definitely need some suspension work, but a lot of the GS500 guys swap GSX-F rear shocks on to stiffen up the back end. I don't know about the front end. Could get by with some decent springs/oil, or a front end swap (there are a few that are a simple swap).

    I'd be happy to be the guinea pig, if I can come up with the scratch for one without getting rid of my bike.
    #89
  10. estebansos

    estebansos Been here awhile

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    Hi,

    I am from Colombia and have owned a Suzuki Freewind, DL-650 and now I ride a DL-1000. The DL-650 is for me, the perfect combination of comfort and dual sport riding. There are tons of them down here, but you should take into account that our roads are far worse than most roads in north america and that should affect your judgment when buying a used bike.

    The KLR is a less common bike, but is strongly getting a place on the local market. In Ecuador its the official cops ride. But I just cant sit on that KLR seat for more than 2 hours, on the other side, 18 hours on the strom feel much better. It would also depend on what kind of riding you want to do, off road, paved roads, occasional side trips to the sand? First thing to do when getting a DL650 is change the tires!

    As a side note, in Ecuador, I had to fix something on the bike and they were very helpful and could fix it rapidly. They know those bikes. In argentina there is also suzuki although less common, still its a reliable bike. You should have no problem with that.

    In case you wanna check the local prices on used bikes check out this site:
    http://listado.tumoto.com.co/motos/suzuki/
    on the left hand side, you will find all brands...
    check it out and feel free to PM me if you want me to go see any bike for you that is in Bogota.

    Best of luck.
    #90
  11. 83GSer

    83GSer n00b

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    Well planning on leaving in October on my frame-up rebuild of an 86 R80 G/S. I too agonized over what would be the best bike. I have a 32 inch inseam and was concerned about weight. For me and my riding skills the R80 won. I've been addressing its deficits one by one. Front fork, electronics, sub-frame and realize nothing is perfect all the while getting comfortable with the bike and loving it. Whatever you choose just give yourself the time to really know it and what could go wrong via past experiences. I feel i can address what could happen on mine even though I have done my best to prepare for a hassle free bike but will deal with it if it happens. Can't plan for everything. Good luck hope to see you on the road. Don't let these guys get to you they mean well and from what i've read, will be there when you need them. Its our role to add to the list of the experienced once we've learned something.
    #91
  12. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    i'd say a dr650 w/ an aftermarket seat, 5 gal ims tank, small windcreen and a good skid plate.
    #92
  13. JDowns

    JDowns Sounds good, let's go!

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    I am currently chilling in Costa Rica on my way back from Panama heading back where I started in Arizona riding a Kawasaki Super Sherpa. Don't overlook the smaller thumpers for Latin American travel. They are a HOOT! The little 250 with an XR650L 4 gallon Clarke gas tank and some throwover soft panniers is the BOMB down here. I have ridden BMWs previously, so this is quite a change for me. But the little Sherpa is easy to wheel into a motel room, gets great gas mileage, cruises
    at a reasonable speed for down here, doesn't attract unnecessary attention, always got waved through the military checkpoints until I got to the two mandatory police checkpoints near Yaviza,Panama, is like riding a little mountain bike on the gnarly backroads, was easy to find knobbies for at the first place I looked in Panama since it uses the same sizes as the little bikes down here, has a bullet proof motor that has required nothing but 2 oil changes since I left the states 6,000 miles ago. I am now sold on riding little thumpers down here. They are so much cheaper to buy and travel on that even poor folks like me can afford to take off on an adventure.

    Just my 2 cents.
    Reporting from Uvita, Costa Rica,
    John Downs
    #93
  14. crashmaster

    crashmaster ow, my balls!

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    Yeah, probably the perfect bike for C.A./S.A. riding. If I could start all over again, I'd be on a two fiddy.
    #94
  15. Baldone1

    Baldone1 I like It Dirty

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    This is absolutely the funniest shit I've ever read!! I think you're right crash, it must be the crack! Where are you now, anyway?
    B'man, you usually irritate the hell out of me but I must be getting used to you because some of your posts on this thread had me laughing my ass off!
    Zokambaa, listen to the wisdom and stop analyzing this to death. Jump on one of your bikes and head south. If it's not the perfect bike for the trip you'll find out but at least you'll be having an adventure!
    Oh, and crash, whoever the guy is in that video you posted should be banned from riding anything with more than one wheel FOREVER!!.......trust me!
    #95
  16. Apocalipsis FZR

    Apocalipsis FZR I´m too old for this....

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    Yes, yes.... keep on dreaming on traveling in Vstroms or KTMs.....and if something breaks, your are going to be in deep sh.....

    Just grab a PRE 96 DR 650 (from 89 to 95) , make a complete engine re build (and THAT IS prety cheap, new distribution chain, rings, oil seals, valves and oil pump, that's it).
    1993 models have a 24 liters fuel tank, no need for engine cases, o rear racks (those came standard) and you have 46 HP in a standard engine.
    Pre 96 DR650 can burn your own piss, and in the north of Chile and in Bolivia THAT is exactly what they offer in the Fuel station....try feeding your catalitic Euro3 Vstrom with that mixture of water, fuel oil, and sand....

    With a Keihing remote or extended fuel mixture screw you can go from the Pacific ocean to the atalntic ocean with no Height problems.....
    Pre 96 Dr come with washable foam filter....wich can be replaced with a piece of used matchress...(Ive done that in Uyuni, Bolivia).

    If you have a couple of extra bucks, Install a used 18 inch rear rim instead of the 17 OEM one .

    And you are ready to go.

    In SA there are few post 96 DR650 (with the exception of Colombia, where the Police use them), but is FULL of rideable PRE 96 DR650, so its full of spare parts (both from Japan and locally made ).

    The 18inches rear wheel will give you a HUGE variety of tires to chose and availability of them (now a days, ALL 125 to 650 chinesse motorcycles come with 18 rear whell, as well almost all Brasilean Honda bikes), so you can buy a 18 knobby tire in almost every big town (TOWNs, you dont need to go to a city).

    The old school Suzy Thumper can go every where and will never broke if she has plenty of oil.....and you can use any Mineral 20W50 motor oil you can find....

    Also you can use a nice BLACK Paint can in order to make your ride less shinny.....so your mate on his Orange KTM will be asked evry time how much the bike cost....:evil
    #96
  17. PlasticSun

    PlasticSun Long Live The Supertanker

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    I'm looking into the same question right now, only I'm planning on riding 2 up. My original plan was an XT225/KL250 but now my gf is coming along and she does not have any riding experience aside from being on the back.

    I've currently got an F650GS Dakar with heaps of TT parts all over it that I've successfully put about 35K on and dumped it plenty. I've hauled it over nasty mountain passes in CO but there's not too much sand down here to practice on here, (every time I'm at Powell and in northern baja I've spent plenty of time horizontally). I like the dakar since it'll do 90 without complaint, and the big front wheel still goes over rocks pretty easily. It is heavy though (with extra side tanks, luggage, etc) and for a solo trip I wanted a bike that would be light which was why I was planning on selling it and going for the small and light XT/KL.

    Now with the plan being 2up I'm looking at heavy bikes again because at least I'll have an extra set of hands around to watch me pick up the bike. :) We've toured together for 4-5K miles on an R1150R, and while I love that bike I'm not too interested in taking it's boxer siblings along, weight is one issue, and while I like the shaft drive on the pavement I don't like it on the dirt. I'm also worried about putting too much weight on it and having trouble with the bearings.

    Right now I'm looking at the DL650 Wee-Strom but I haven't spent any time on one. On paper it seems just about right, 60hp, comfortable seat and space to keep both occupants happy, etc. One thing I'm not sure about is how the bike stacks up to the F650 in terms of dirt riding capability. I'm sure it'll be just fine for a graded road, pot holes, gravel etc, seems like it wouldn't be the bike to haul up to Mike's Sky Ranch two up though, it's heavy, has alloy wheels, needs the oil cooler relocated, and needs the most farkle to suit our needs (luggage, seat, pegs, bars, skid plate, heated grips, 12v socket, crash bars, and geared down.)

    I could purchase a 92 transalp, in very good condition for the trip. I love the ergonomics of that bike, but it's older, and I'd expect parts to be more of a hassle than the Suzuki. Additional downsides are the fact that it's carb'd vs fuel injected which just seems like a hassle when traveling in the andes, and that it's beautiful, so my heart would break every time I damaged it, where I find the Vstrom kinda ugly, so marring up the paint on it would only make it charming to me.

    I've got the F650 which is a big plus for it and it's got all the fancy touring bits as well, TT bags, ohlins shock, extra fuel tanks, nice seat etc. My concerns with it is that it's really cramped two up. On the 1150 she could move around a bit where on the F650 she's nearly on top of me and we're both thin people (170/110). There's also the issue of parts, I've had trouble before getting sprockets in the right size outside of a dealer or the internet, and the bike already has 53K on the frame and 15K on the current motor. I'm also a bit tired of paying the roundel tax every time it needs something.

    By selling the F650, I'd have enough budget to purchase a DL650 or the transalp and put an extra grand or two into getting it setup for us. OR I could put a grand into the F650 (upgrade the wheels, lower the suspension for additional traction against tip overs when two up, and purchase some spares).

    What does ADVrider think I should do?

    EDIT: Oh right what kind of riding do we plan to do? I like to camp on the beach, Ruta 40 is very appealing to me and so are most of the tracks in Bolivia, I'd like to spend a week camping in the Atacama, visiting places like the Salar de Uyuni, Largo Verde, calle del muerte, etc. I'm less interested in tropical jungle and wrestling the bike through mud/clay seems like a bad time on just about anything less than a dirt bike. I plan to cover most of the distance between points A and B on pavement but I also plan to take many side trips on dirt roads and use dirt roads to reach more out of the way towns. The judgement I've used in the past is that if it's the main road that the locals use I'll go for it. Anything rougher/steeper than the road to Batopilas I don't think we'd be too interested in.
    #97
  18. JamesOn2Wheels

    JamesOn2Wheels Banned

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    dammit..back in the states
    I still like the little Qingqi/Euromot dr200 copy
    2000 bucks in Chile, 3000 in Colombia, 2500 in Costa Rica
    heading out of Santiago this week on one

    Zig
    #98
  19. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

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    The DL650 is just about the perfect mid size choice. Once your F650 is fully loaded up with gear and going two up, it will not have that much advantage over the DL650 off road. It does have more ground clearance but with a bash plate and better suspension the Wee will do remarkably well off road. It's not a moto crosser but very capable, even two up. Check the Ride Reports.

    The only problem getting up to Mike's Sky Rance would be the sometimes deep sand on the first few miles of the straight road once you leave main highway. Deep sand can be tricky on the Strom, but a lot of this depends of the rider. TKC80 knobbies would help a lot too. The rest of the way to Mike's is easily Vstrom doable I did it on my DL1000. Just take the rough areas a bit slowly. No problema.

    But in so many other ways the DL650 will be better than your F650. Mostly because you've got more room for two on the bike. Better seat. Better cruising, Japanese electrics, and no stupid BMW F.I., bearing failures, leaking water pumps, dead battery problems so common on the F650's. Also, the Wee strom cast wheels are Hella tough. Do not worry about them. They can take a shot you would not believe. Also, the rear subframe is way way stronger than the F650 BMW. The Wee Strom is bullet proof and basically will be truly maintenance free.

    Put on bark busters and bash plate, up grade suspension, add luggage and go. Start with new chain/sprockets, new tires (carry spare rear) new battery. Bring money, have fun!
    #99
  20. bananaman

    bananaman transcontimental

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    If you think I can irritate the hell out of you online, you should meet me in real life. I'm even worse.

    My first ride into Mexico was on my BMW R1100RS. I had a new clutch and decent Wilburs shocks, but it felt like I was going to break the entire bike. It was awesome on the toll roads where you can easily go 100 mph, but everywhere else, it sucked. For me, anyway. So I tried the "ride what ya got" theory, and I didn't like it.

    If I was going two-up... my original plan was to ride two-up. We were twice as anal as the OP, and our choice was the 96 R1100GS that I'm still riding.

    Colomtnbkr is right- I've never owned a KLR. Which means I don't have anything against them.

    I promise that I don't drink BMW coolaid. I actually ride my old pig. A few weeks ago I was ready to ride to Panama again. I prepped my bike- basically, valve job, brake fluid flush, throttle cable, oil change, and fresh tires. And then, instead of Panama, I rode California and back. On my last day, after I was just sick of killing myself against wind, rain, and snow, I managed to push that pig 970 miles in 13.5 hours.

    970 miles in 13.5 hours.

    With a TKC80 front tire and a Metzler Tourance rear tire.

    On a 15 year old bike (1996 model built in 1995) with about 75,000 or 100,000 miles on it (I don't know the mileage because the speedo broke years ago and I'm too fucking lazy to fix it).

    Maybe you won't want to, or need to, ride a thousand miles in a day, but I like having a bike that will let me.