Would you buy again?

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by Brokebrute, Nov 7, 2014.

  1. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Oddometer:
    5,745
    Location:
    Grand Valley, Colorado
    The 8GS.... No. But that is not really the bikes fault. The 8GS is a fine ride, that have good market share, and different riders have different goals and style. Generally speaking, I think there are too many things that have to be tweaked for optimum performance, in comparison to the price you pay. If those things were adjustable out of the box, then that would have been ok. But they are not, and it ends up costing you an arm and a leg.I think the biggest one is the fact that the front forks have no rebound, and compression control. Idiots.... ( BMW). That really is the best word that comes to mind. Spring rate... I get that. We are all different weight, but no compression/rebound. That is a major blunder. I had mine since 2009 so I have seen the early ugly'nes. Generally speaking on a fleet wide basis, I think reliability is good, with some misses, like gas tank cracking... etc...etc... That took too long to fix. Personally I think that 30000+ miles on a stator is acceptable, but I do take issue with a company that know a defective is in their bike and NOT offering a free replacement or other means of help.
    That being said, I loved riding my 8GS, as it always made me grin. But I sank in a ton of $$ in it, and have not gotten to the forks. I did not plan on replacing it. Then I rode a different bike, and what really sold me on that was the simple fact that everything felt great out of the box. ( with perhaps exception of the handle bar heights, as they could go up 1/2-3/4 inch for perfection) everything was adjustable and ergos was fantastic. Geometry was awesome. That is where I think BMW missed the boat on the 8GS. To summarize...:
    To many things/items NOT adjustable without sinking in lots of mullah, which makes the 8GS a very expensive bike.
    #81
  2. lorraine78

    lorraine78 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2014
    Oddometer:
    28
    just wondering guys why bmw has gone for those alloy moulded spoke wheels for offraod use on some of their bikes not a good move,wont they crack on the dirt?
    I also had a look at another bmw 800 offroad machine the one with the plastic petrol tanks at the back,also not another good move I would think as a stick would just poke right on through that plastic,that bike would have to be the worst attempt at an dual purpose motorcycle I have seen,the older type bmw 800 was a great machine and most are still running,two reasons I would not go for a higher priced bike these days for dual purpose machine is that extra money for a bmw or the triumph tiger is not a bike you would want to take out in the rough,would be scared to break something,and a drive shaft with a mono shock offroad don't seem like a good idea to me either
    #82
  3. Brokebrute

    Brokebrute Been here awhile

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    Nov 6, 2014
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    Tracy, Ia.
    Thanks for all the replies. My buddy just bought a new 2014 800 GSA. I am looking forward to riding it and the Triumph back to back. I already have tires and top box in the garage for the winner.
    #83
  4. AK650

    AK650 Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2013
    Oddometer:
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    Alaska
    You're probably trolling, but WTH, I'll bite. If not, you should really do a little research first.

    The OP was regarding the F800GS.

    It doesn't have cast wheels, it has laced wheels.

    Yes it has a plastic petrol tank, under the seat. If a stick were to pierce it, there's a good chance that it pieced you as well. In which case, the petrol tank is the least of your worries!

    The F800 doesn't have a drive shaft, it uses a traditional chain/sprocket drive.

    Jeff
    #84
  5. Brokebrute

    Brokebrute Been here awhile

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    Nov 6, 2014
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    Tracy, Ia.
    Well I've made my decision. Level B roads are as far as I get off road most of the time, lots of gravel travel. I will be purchasing the Tiger 800. With the upgrades on the 2015 it edged out the GS for my type of riding. Thanks for all the input.
    #85
  6. Gaspare

    Gaspare Almost dirt rider

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2011
    Oddometer:
    75
    Location:
    Piacenza (IT)
    I can understand the opening of the season, but my suggestion regards patience.

    Honda True Adventure is coming finally... down here in Italy [reliable]voices are talking about june.

    Seen the Honda targets for this bike, could be the best buy; moreover my guess is about a better overall evolution since the very first model, compared to aged competitors.

    Let's investigate :brow
    #86
  7. KDXfile

    KDXfile Been here awhile

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    Feb 10, 2009
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    Hoover, AL.
    Excellent choice :clap I love my Tiger. Neither one are really that good in dirt and both do gravel fine. You'll love that Tiger motor and the XCX has way better suspension stock.
    #87
  8. NDTransplant

    NDTransplant Been here awhile

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    Jan 24, 2010
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    485
    Location:
    Dodgeville, WI
    I came very close to buying an 800 XCX as well. Triumph's triple is a really nice motor. The better suspension, factory cruise control....good stuff!

    Best wishes with that new Tiger.
    #88
  9. Vampir

    Vampir Aimless Wanderer

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2013
    Oddometer:
    393
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    Oregon
    That is exactly my story with even the same model years. I have no plans of selling my second one and plan to drive it until it is dust.

    It is perplexing to me all griping about unreliable BMWs. Maybe I'm just stupid lucky but I've had almost no problems at all with the three BMWs that I've owned other than needing to tighten a bolt every now and then and do my own routine maintenance.

    I'll put a small asterisk on that: The F800GS OEM seat isn't very good for longer rides. Both my daughter and I do like the BMW comfort seats. On the Sertao, the throttle position sensor is finicky and oil changes are more complex than necessary.
    #89