Would you use a New in the wrapper Michelin tire made in 2011?

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by wildwestrider, Mar 5, 2020.

  1. ROAD DAMAGE

    ROAD DAMAGE Long timer Supporter

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    My $00.02.

    For me IT DEPENDS on what type of riding and what type of bike I'd be using that tire for.

    Put an older tire on a track bike? NO WAY! :nah
    Put an older tire on a 170 hp sport bike that will be ridden aggressively? NO WAY JOSE! :bandit :nah

    But put an older tire on a dual sport bike that will not get ridden very aggressively? Sure, why not.
    Put an older tire on your CT90? Sure, why not. :dunno :D
    If you'll be wringing that RT's neck for all it's worth .......... NOPE, NEW RUBBER NEEDED.
    But if you'll be riding that RT at a leisurely pace .......... SURE, USE THE OLDER TIRE.

    I've actually taken a sander to an older tire that had a hard look/feel to it. :lol3
    Basically I was curious about it, and decided to "scrub it in" before I mounted it.
    I was surprised at just how sticky/pliable/supple the tire still was once the thin "hard rubber varnish" layer on the surface was gone.

    In several hundreds of thousands of miles on 2 wheels I've only had one tire failure that was "unusual".

    I was in the process of doing a "Fly-n-ride" from SoCal back to CO via the "scenic route" when the rear tire failed after a few thousand miles. I had an experienced m/c tire guy tell me that the tire had been "very hot" at some point and the rubber had "broken down". He theorized that it had been run lots of miles while it was pretty low of air generating a lot of heat. This picture below shows the delamination of the tire over on the left edge. You can see where the rubber is coming off in large thin flakes around the steel belts. The other side of the tire was just beginning to do the same thing. It was on a K1200GT. Weird. The tire went from "a lot of meat" .......... to showing cords in just a few hours of normal road riding. I asked the tire guy "was this due to age"? (The tires were 8-9 years old as I remember, as the bike had been mostly sitting for those 8-9 years). He said "No, tires don't fail like this due to age ......... this was from high heat."
    Again, only my $00.02 from my real world experiences.


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    #21
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  2. Jim Moore

    Jim Moore "You ain't black!"

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    Up until a few months ago I would have said yes, but now no. I had a tire from 2010 sitting in my garage. I had sold the bike so it sat for years. I happened to have a flat on a bike I had just bought. Same size! Yay! I put the old (new) tire on and rode for a few weeks. The handling was REALLY weird at lean and I was spinning up leaving stop lights at normal throttle settings. I thought I had a suspension problem so I messed around with that for awhile. I finally decided to change the tire, and sure enough, that fixed it.
    #22
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  3. Woofhound

    Woofhound Adventurer

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    I'd run it on the rear, I ran the original Metzlers on my 01 half of last summer with no issues..... My thought is if they aren't cracked I run them. 079439524_10221974640101627_3047603618082455552_n.jpg
    #23
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  4. Lansraad

    Lansraad Refugee from the land of over-policed bitumen

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    That credit card sized contact patch is all there is between you and a slide in the corner.

    Why risk it?

    A lot of people happily plug and/or patch tyres and will tell you tales of riding them down to the canvass.

    Fine - if that is what you want to do, then up to you. For me, plugs and patches are self-rescue remedies designed to get you out of a predicament and into a service centre.

    My view is that motorcycling is inherently dangerous and I generally look to minimise the risks where possible. Deciding *not* to use a nine year old tyre seems a very simple and easy way to remove a risk factor.
    #24
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  5. Krons

    Krons Been here awhile

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    Here is my experience. Last December bought a set of used Pirelli Rally Scorpion knobbies. Backstory was the guy had them on a Harley Sportster as a scrambler for a few hundred miles, then went another route. I paid $80 w/ shipping for the set.

    They show up looking good but with 2012 date codes. We trade some messages, my thought he should have disclosed that, and he offers me a credit for 1/2 of price. My dealer gives them a look, no cracks, rubber seems sticky so we mount them. Today at 1600 miles on them (gravel and pavement) I am finding more noise from the front and see the center knobs wearing strange. Most concerning, some knobs are worn more than others. In this picture you can see the back of top center knob at 3mm, while the back of the lower center knob is at 1mm.
    20200523_064505.jpg

    I doubt I'll ever buy used tires again, and even when "new" ones are cheap, I ask for date codes. I would mount 5 year old tires if they look good, but nothing older. New set of Mitas E07+ are on the way.
    #25
  6. wildwestrider

    wildwestrider Pack-Mule Hooligan

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    Thanks for the input guys,.....I tossed the tire after reading the first few replies.
    #26
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  7. Hikertrash

    Hikertrash Wasted Rock Ranger

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    I bought a 2005 RT with fairly low mileage Michelin Pilots on it (500mi) from a guy who always kept it in the garage. The tires were made in 2010, but were in mint condition and I put another 1000mi on them. I wasn't really concerned about them falling apart, but I was concerned about slipping when riding in the rain and the mountain twistys. I did get them replaced with new tires recently because I didn't want to gamble on an upcoming Iron Butt ride. JVB is right. The tires were very, very hard and the difference was night and day as far as ride comfort goes. When I road away from the dealer after the new tire install, I thought I was riding a new bike. Would I install a new old tire on my bike? Not after knowing how they ride. I was always skiddish about leaning into corners too much and the rear tire had slipped a couple times in the rain which I think was due to them being so hard and not having the grip that a newer tire would've had.
    #27
  8. phuzzygnu

    phuzzygnu Been here awhile

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    . e99ab871ddb463032a39e5e8e1201d1c.jpg
    #28
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  9. brianpc

    brianpc Long timer Supporter

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    Thank you for posting that, @phuzzygnu - and he wasn't even driving. :/ Post-crash analysis reveals the tires were OEM and probably 10-12 yrs old?

    Surprised by some of the responses here.
    #29
  10. LAFS

    LAFS Long timer

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    Yes I am surprised by answers here also. I just replaced all 4 Michelin's on my Accord because they are old and started cracking. They had over half the tread life left on them. They were 7 year old OEM tires. I trust my inspection guy. He said Lee they may be ok but they are old and are a hard tire to begin with as that is how you get the mileage, however they just get harder over time.Ohh and he does not really sell tires so not a sales tactic just a friend warning me.

    Point is no matter how much tread on the tire the rubber needs to be pliable to grip.

    As to the failure question how would you know? If a tire blows out and the tread looks ok what service station is going to look at the date stamp? Further why would they care they are putting a new tire on and making money.

    Again everyone assumes their own level of risk. I go everywhere fast, car or bike, so I need good rubber and good brakes and I never scrimp or stress over replacing tires on any vehicle. And NOTHING beats new rubber on a bike or car.
    #30
  11. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Smoove, Smoove like velvet.

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    #31
  12. KingOfFleece

    KingOfFleece SplitWeight(tm) waterproof seat covers Supporter

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    Ever study factors in accident reconstruction? That tire would be a factor.
    #32
  13. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    No. To save what...$150? NO.
    #33
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  14. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    Some of you would have run these:
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    #34
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  15. Krons

    Krons Been here awhile

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    Your crack should never be showing.
    #35
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  16. AviatorTroy

    AviatorTroy Following my front fender

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    That is completely normal for knobbies that are ridden hard on the street and has absolutely positively nothing to do with the age of the tires
    #36
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  17. RonKZ650

    RonKZ650 Been here awhile

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    Use it and don't even think of age. This tire age thing has been so beaten to death. Back in the 70s and 80s and before, nobody even knew or cared what age the tires were, we just ran tires based on tread depth, and of course if you had huge gaping cracks use common sense and get a new tire. Yes if the tire is made in 1972, get a new one, 2011 just use it.
    #37
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  18. texas123

    texas123 Been here awhile

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    I can’t tell if you’re serious or mocking me.
    This thread reminds me of my mother in law who’s smoked her entire life, and she implies that cigarettes don’t kill. I then agree with her, and encourage her to carry on since the smoke is probably keeping her alive by killing the bacteria in her lungs. Rinse, repeat with father in law and his bacon sandwiches.
    #38
  19. brianpc

    brianpc Long timer Supporter

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    The sad part is, 95% of "bargain minded" folks like this will never have an issue. So yeah, sure it'll be fine.

    It'll probably also be fine to not wear a helmet or gear while you ride, too.

    Smart motorcycle riding is all about minimizing risk and doing what you can to limit exposure to danger factors - and running old / bad tires seems like something you'd REALLY want to address before strapping yourself to a moto.

    Nobody I ride with has this "it's old it's fine" mentality and I'm very glad of it.
    #39
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  20. brianpc

    brianpc Long timer Supporter

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    #40
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