WUMPA - my DMC R1150GS Adventure rig

Discussion in 'Hacks' started by DRONE, Apr 26, 2011.

  1. jaydmc

    jaydmc Long timer

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    Your sub frame is already powder coated.
    If you want it repowdercoated we send stuff out every Monday and get it back the following monday and would be glad to send it out with our stuff to save you some money.
    Jay G
    DMC sidecars
    866-638-1793
  2. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    Thanks, Jay, but too late!! There's a powdercoater 5 minutes from my house able to strip the subframe, blast it and re-coat it for $62. Dropped it off there on my way back from Fife. I'm changing it to "alu" silver to match my y-pipe and engine. So it'll really look good from underneath for when I'm changing the oil! :rofl
  3. davebig

    davebig Another Angry Hun !

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    Drone
    I like your clutch plate choice anyway and ceramic coated Y pipe, not for appearance but a warm pipe is a better flowing pipe.Where you perhaps a pilot in a previous career ? It never hurts to error on the side of caution.

    I just picked my effort up from Claude on Monday and hauled it 1k miles home. I used an 04 GS adv also for a tug with 70 + k miles everyone put on by me I'll post my show and tell ego thread in a few days.I'm the mini Schnauzer fan who bought an old GL1100/Ural from one of your neighbors in Firecrest after straightening that mess out, I decided I liked sidecars enough to pursue it more,(that and I had a buyer for the Honda/Ural) hence one of Claude's for one of my GS's. they're allot different from the gl/Ural rig.DB
  4. claude

    claude Sidecar Jockey

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    Glad you got home okay davebig. And thanks for tweaking my GS a little the thing does run a lot better!!
  5. KCDakar

    KCDakar What are we waiting for?

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    DRONE, I have a 1150GS with a Dauntless tub, and I love it! I had also put a mile or two on my clutch. Around 117,000 sMiles as a matter of fact. And it still had some life in it! Well, at least you couldn't read the news paper through it yet! :lol3 I have had the tub on it for almost 2 years now. This last winter I had it torn down for some much needed work and put in a Wunderlich sintered clutch and R850R 37:11 FD. The rig now climbs up steep hills like a mountain goat! :evil

    I'm sure you will like the clutch. I can't say enough good things about mine! Some things to keep in mind if this is your first one. It will take a LOT longer to bed the clutch than with a stock clutch. I got mine bedding in at about the 1000 sMile point. And by 1500 I was golden! I have talked to others who said it took almost 2000 or more on theirs. If you try to baby the bedding process you will really hate the clutch. It will chatter and clang like a caged ape! Keep your RPMs up just a bit higher than normal and be real smooth (I'm not talking slow, just smooth, and just as fast as you would with the stock one) when letting out the clutch and you will fall in love when it does finally bed in. I would be the first one to admit I am a bit hard on my bikes. I never was one to take the easy route. That said, I do try to take good care of them, I just don't baby them. :D

    Speed Safe...
  6. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    Yeah, KC, I read your posts and every other one on this topic before deciding on the sintered clutch. Appreciate your info and feedback.

    For all the experts out there-- is there a way to speed up the bedding? I seem to remember a post by MikePa saying that he would gently slip his ceramic clutch over and over again out on the highway at a steady 60 or 70 mph in order to get it bedded fast. My memory might be flawed, but the question remains--is there a way to bed it faster?

    Yeah, I know, just buy it three Long Island Ice Teas and tell it that it has beautiful skin. :D
  7. KCDakar

    KCDakar What are we waiting for?

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    Jm2c, Tough you have a sintered clutch, all the other parts are still Stock. To much heat can still harm those parts.
    May I ask why you would want to speed this process up? Just wondering...:ear
  8. davebig

    davebig Another Angry Hun !

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    The way we used to do it with cars with single disc clutches was to put the car against something solid (phone pole) and slip the clutch a bit.If a disk is fuzzy and grabby slipping it burns the whiskers off of the disc face.DB
  9. Abenteuerfahrer

    Abenteuerfahrer Deaf on Wheels

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    I am sans moto/sidecar now and will slowly become history in all things technical input regarding sidecaring
    :cry. but a little bit of wisdom is still there for me to give..... you some input. Hope ya'll don't mind.

    Your clutch has a full 360 sintered surface, while mine is/was a TT ceramic clutch that had four hockey puck like knobs at 12-3-6-9 o'clock. With this set-up one had to bed the clutch and pressure plate slowly over a span of approximately 2000-4000 miles, because there were only 4 contact poinnts. Mikepa also had a TT ceramic clutch thus the attempt to break it in earlier ?, however on his GS1150 he had remove a shim now and then given so many miles before a final perfet precise matting was evident. This is shim reduction is not done on 1200GS'es.

    Not so with your 360 sintered clutch. Yours will eventually bed itself in no time...drive like you would everyday...no need to speed up the bedding..just go and enjoy. You'll love it:clap.

    Now if you ask what's the difference between ceramic and sintered:

    Ceramic is the hardest, and longest wearing. It is a horrible conductor of heat, so all slipping heat goes onto the plates. It will last the longest. Certainly that if you ever replace it... the plates will need to be replaced also. Generally has the narrowest friction zone. Can be slow to break in....2000-6000 miles depending on your riding habits, terrain, etc! If you seriously intentionally abuse it to the hilt it can "eat" into your pressure plate like candy. It's a lifetime clutch..possibly a heirloom for your kids next bike:rofl.

    Sintered is composite mostly metallic substance, consisting of steel, carbon, copper (not so much now) and other metal and non-metallic (even some ceramics) powders pressed together under high heat and pressure. Here the disk and plates will both get hot, so a bit different thermal capacity. Also wears the plates but not as bad as organic, breaks in much faster, much improved friction zone. Both will get you home if your main seal leaks and the clutch housing pools oil!

    So Dronie :D...let it spin...give it time to marry...then a great long relationship into the golden years.:freaky.

    cheers...
  10. mightymatt43

    mightymatt43 URALiNEED

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    I'm gonna miss these lessons. I have seriously considered going to a ceramic clutch and now feel a bit more educated. Thank you, sir!
  11. Melrone

    Melrone Long timer

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    i see this sight is still going.Alot to talk about,I see.That great tire that came with my wheel kit finnally fried this summer on way to the MOA Nationals barely had 7k on that tire..I'v got almost 40k on my rig and the clutch feels good.I do bleed it every winter and the steel braided line makes a different(was on there when I bought it..) Keep it guys always a learning experince...:clap
  12. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    Matt--Welcome back to North America! It never occured to me before but now I gotta ask--does BigBoi have an OEM clutch? If it does, then, DANG! Were there times during your trip when you were cursing at the organic clutch, or was it dependable? I kinda remember you having trouble getting to a tree house?

    I've noticed that the Winterbiker people use sintered clutches in their world-traveler rigs. Would you agree that for serious travel it makes sense to switch out the OEM clutch, or does it work just fine (even though of course we all know it will wear out faster than on a solo bike) and should only be upgraded once the original clutch is done?

    BTW, great pic--

    [​IMG]

    Anybody who hasn't read Matt's ride report, set aside 2 or 3 days then click here.
  13. davebig

    davebig Another Angry Hun !

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    Drone
    Originally you asked if issues ever end with sidecar rigs, probably not and there are so many of them.Perhaps if your bikes not apart yet you should consider changing the final drive ratio and see how that goes before spending the money to change clutches. Final drives are allot easier cost less and play a major role. When I decided to attache a chair to my GSadv I added a 32/11 (11** RT ) I had laying around these are cheap and plentiful on ebay. 65 mph is 4K rpm in 6th on the Adv trans. Beemer gear sets are 11/33, 11/34, 11/37 I've also played with an 11/34 in my hot rod gs the trade off is they spin the tire allot easier in slippery stuff.
    I live in MN I ride Mississippi river valley possibly the NE US, I'm not taking an 8-9 hundred pound behemoth places it doesn't the stock clutch will last along time if your not slipping it, to get out of situations.DB
  14. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    Well certainly changing your crown gears will reduce the wear and tear on your clutch and give your rig more low end grunt. But remember -- I don't actually have anything wrong with my clutch. I'm replacing mine proactively because my slave cylinder went south. I'm saving about $300 in labor costs by getting them both done at the same time. Now I simply won't have to worry about it anymore.

    I have the 31/11 crown gears and I find that my outfit has enough power and enough suspension to run most backcountry roads around here in 2nd or 3rd even when loaded up for camping. When the road turns nasty I can usually power through in 1st at 2500 or 3000 rpm without using the clutch. Pretty seldom when I actually have to rev the motor and slip the clutch at the same time to finesse my way through a steep boulder field or deep ruts or something like that. And to tell you the truth, I hit 85 (90 indicated) more often than is probably wise. So, for me, the 31/11 seems to be working OK. But for the guys who use their rigs more aggressively off-pavement changing out the crown gears will protect the clutch.
  15. DaFoole

    DaFoole Well Marbled... Super Supporter

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    MAN that is a SWEET rig!!!! Thanks for sharing your info!!!! :clap
  16. BeeMaa

    BeeMaa Hack Pilot

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    DRONE,

    Remember you were asking about how to prevent your Happy Trails right side pannier from hitting your car?
    I believe you put a limiting strap on the inside to remedy this. (Claude's idea)
    I have come up with a different solution.

    I called Jesse Luggage and spoke with Al.
    He is making me a set of Safari bags with hinges on the front for me...at no additional charge.
    I will post a few pics when they show up.
    Should be about a week or so.
    The one down side is that there will only be one handle to lift the bags off, but I don't see that as too much of a hassle.

    Cheers.
  17. Melrone

    Melrone Long timer

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    Thats what the original own did to my Happy trails.He moved the hinge to the front on the right sude bag only. It works great...Lifts up doesn't hit the tub...
  18. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    Yeah I did do the limiting strap idea and that's working well for me especially because I use that pannier for the stuff that I only need to get at the end of the day. Ya know, things like the whiskey bottle and the dog food.

    The front hinge would require some modification to the lids to grind off the existing hinge flanges but should work just fine.
  19. dholaday

    dholaday Been here awhile Supporter

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    To continue the pannier lid hijack: Has anyone done a top lid hinge on a Micatech?
    Elmer was going to do it, but didn't have time. I need to do it and would like to show my local machine shop guy an example when I get home.
    TIA
  20. Abenteuerfahrer

    Abenteuerfahrer Deaf on Wheels

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    I did contact the guy/gal at Micatech to see whether they could do a top lid mod with hinge facing forward; kinda expensive I was told...as I would be the first one to have such a modification done...low volume...the whole side door will have to be welded shut, etc...! although they could do it. Thought of doing it myself...using a lot of fiberglass trimming, rivetting and epoxying the side door shut, etc...but since my aluminum welding is not up to par, ditched the idea and lived with it.

    I think you'd be better off in designing of how you want it to perform: open; lift; hinge; lid; sidedoor...lock... water resistant grooves, etc then take it to you local aluminum fabricator!

    cheers...